Family Tree of Timothy J. Barron

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  • ID: I3055
  • Name: Emma Elkins 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
  • Sex: F
  • Birth: 6 MAR 1865 in Wolfe County, Kentucky, USA
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  • LATI: N37.741684
  • LONG: W83.490433 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
  • Residence: 1870 US Census 5 AUG 1870 Wolfe County, Kentucky, USA
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  • LATI: N37.741684
  • LONG: W83.490433 1
  • Death: 31 DEC 1933 in Lexington, Fayette County, Kentucky, USA
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  • LATI: N37.988689
  • LONG: W84.477699 3 4 9
  • Residence: 1880 US Census 4 JUN 1880 Wolfe County, Kentucky, USA
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  • LATI: N37.741684
  • LONG: W83.490433 2
  • Name:
  • Name:
  • Birth: 10
  • Name:
  • Residence: 1910 US Census 27 APR 1910 Winchester, Clark County, Kentucky, USA
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  • LATI: N37.990082
  • LONG: W84.179649 6
  • Residence: 1930 US Census 10 APR 1930 Lexington, Fayette County, Kentucky, USA
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  • LATI: N37.988689
  • LONG: W84.477699 5
  • Residence: 1900 US Census 6 JUN 1900 Campton, Wolfe County, Kentucky, USA
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  • LATI: N37.734249
  • LONG: W83.547386 8
  • Residence: 1920 US Census 2 JAN 1920 Lexington, Fayette County, Kentucky, USA
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  • LATI: N37.988689
  • LONG: W84.477699 7
  • Name:
  • Birth: 10



    Father: Jeremiah E. Elkins b: 16 JUL 1816 in Virginia, USA
    Mother: Esther Richmond b: ABT 1818 in Virginia, USA

    Marriage 1 Anderson Floyd Byrd b: 22 JAN 1864 in Wolfe County, Kentucky, USA
    • Married: 3 MAR 1887 in Kentucky, USA 8 8
    • Note:

      RESEARCH STANDARD APPLIED
      Researched by Timothy J. Barron, updated February 7, 2015

      The initial information was found in Clay Hollon's 1958 book "Hollon and Related Families." Emma is listed as a daughter of Jeremiah and Esther on page 51, and that she married A. Floyd Byrd. The marriage of Emma and A. Floyd Byrd is listed on page 61, along with the names and birth dates of their six children. The information has been subsequently supported via the records and documentation listed below.

      1870 CENSUS OF ANDERSON FLOYD BYRD
      Researched by Timothy J. Barron, updated February 7, 2015

      The U.S. Census enumerated on July 14, 1870 shows him living with his parents in Wolfe County, Kentucky: Anderson F. Byrd, age 6, male, white, born in Kentucky.

      1870 CENSUS OF EMMA ELKINS
      Researched by Timothy J. Barron, updated February 7, 2015

      The U.S. Census enumerated on August 5, 1870 shows her living with her parents in Wolfe County, Kentucky: Emily Elkins, age 6, female, white, born in Kentucky.

      1880 CENSUS OF EMMA ELKINS
      Researched by Timothy J. Barron, updated February 7, 2015

      The U.S. Census enumerated on June 4, 1880 shows her living with her brother in Wolfe County, Kentucky: Emily Elkins, white, female, age 15, sister, single, attended school, born in Kentucky, father born in Virginia, mother born in Virginia.

      1880 CENSUS OF ANDERSON FLOYD BYRD
      Researched by Timothy J. Barron, updated February 7, 2015

      The U.S. Census enumerated on June 12, 1880 shows him living with his parents in Wolfe County, Kentucky: Anderson F. Byrd, white, male, age 16, son, single, occupation: works on farm, attending school, born in Kentucky, father born in Tennessee, mother born in Kentucky.

      1900 CENSUS OF THE ANDERSON FLOYD BYRD FAMILY
      Researched by Timothy J. Barron, updated February 7, 2015

      The U.S. Census enumerated on June 6, 1900 shows the family living in Campton, Wolfe County, Kentucky: Andrew F. Byrd, head of household, white, male, born January 1865, age 35, married 13 years, born in Kentucky, father born in Tennessee, mother born in Kentucky, occupation: farmer, can read, can write; Emma Byrd, wife, white, female, born March 1865, age 35, married 13 years, 5 [hard to read] children born, 4 children living, born in Kentucky, father born in Virginia, mother born in Virginia, can read, can write; Bessie Byrd, daughter, white, female, born March 1889, age 11, single, born in Kentucky, father born in Kentucky, mother born in Kentucky, at school, can read, can write; Carl Byrd, son, white, male, born August 1892, age 7, single, born in Kentucky, father born in Kentucky, mother born in Kentucky; Burnie Byrd, son, white, male, born January 1895, age 5, single, born in Kentucky, father born in Kentucky, mother born in Kentucky; Herbert Byrd, son, white, male, born October 1897, age 2, single, born in Kentucky, father born in Kentucky, mother born in Kentucky; Mollie Salley, boarder, white, female, born July 1872, age 26, single, born in Kentucky, father born in West Virginia, mother born in Kentucky, occupation: [hard to read], can read, can write; Letcher Byrd, boarder, white, male, born May 1881, age 19, single, born in Kentucky, father born in Kentucky, mother born in Kentucky, at school, can read, can write; Henry C. Hollon, boarder, white, male, born February 1880, age 20, single, born in Kentucky, father born in Kentucky, mother born in Kentucky, at school, can read, can write.

      1903 NEWSPAPER ARTICLE ON EMMA BYRD
      Researched by Timothy J. Barron, updated February 7, 2015

      The following appears in the Hazel Green Herald newspaper from Hazel Green, Wolfe County, Kentucky on June 11, 1903 on page 4: "Mrs. Emma Byrd, wife of A.F. Byrd, is visiting her husband at Jackson this week during Circuit Court. Their son, Carl, is also visiting the same place."

      1903 NEWSPAPER ARTICLE ON ANDERSON FLOYD BYRD
      Researched by Timothy J. Barron, updated February 7, 2015

      The following appeared in the Big Sandy News newspaper from Kentucky, on June 26, 1903, on page 2:

      "From a vigorous editorial in the Courier-Journal we take the following: To the eleven men who stood out for the death of Jett the State of Kentucky is greatly obligated. They did nothing more than their duty, it is true, but they did it at a time and under conditions when to do such a duty demanded mend of heroic mold. They could not have served their country better than by their courageous votes to hang Jett, despite the formidable influence they faced. The record they have made will always be an honor for themselves and their children, and this honor Kentucky will ever be glad to recognize."

      "But the man to whom, more than all others, Kentucky's gratitude is awarded in this page of her dark history is Anderson Floyd Byrd, the Commonwealth's Attorney, who, almost alone and unaided, has fought this case to the very shadow of the gallows. His conduct of it has been vigilant, vigorous and able. That it has been brand to an unsurpassed degree is patent to everyone at all familiar with the obstacles and influences which he so fearlessly defied. More than once since the beginning of this trial he has been compared to Folk, of St. Louis, but Folk, as splendid as has been work, confronted no such obstructions and required no such courage as Byrd. Folk assailed corruption in city politics, and risked only the enmity of those who at worst could make political warfare on him; Byrd at every step took his life in his hands. His professional career, his very existence were bound up in the limited locality dominated by anarchists who ruled by assassination and the menace of assassination which they had been sure to make good. When he determined to do his duty in this case, notwithstanding this menace, he had every reason for assuming that he was ending both his professional and personal existence.'"

      1903 NEWSPAPER ARTICLE ON ANDERSON FLOYD BYRD
      Researched by Timothy J. Barron, updated February 7, 2015

      The following appeared in the New York Times newspaper in New York, New York, on November 9, 1903, on page 10:

      "Prosecutor Fears Feudists: A. Floyd Byrd, Who Prosecuted Kentucky Mountaineers, Will Remain Away from Breathitt County. Lexington, Ky. Nov. 8: A. Floyd Byrd, Commonwealth Attorney of Breathitt County, who gained a reputation in the prosecution of Curtis Jett and Thomas White for the Marcum murder, in a long distance telephone communication tonight confirmed the rumor that he has decided to remain away from Breathitt County during the term of court that begins at Jackson tomorrow. His action is taken upon the insistent solicitations of friends and relatives, who declare that judging from the past history of the county, his life would be in constant peril there. He has not received warning of a definite plot to take his life. T.P. Cole of Jackson has been temporarily appointed Prosecuting Attorney. There will be no indictments at the coming term of the court, Mr. Byrd says, in connection with the numerous assassination cases and further investigation will be postpone for the present. Mr. Byrd's term of office will expire Jan. 1. He will then move to Winchester, Ky., to reside permanently, but does not expect to server himself entirely from the mountains, in which he has been instrumental in bringing about a reign of law and order. Only minor cases are on the docket of the Breathitt Circuit Court, and the trials which begin this week will be in marked contrast to the last term when Jett and White were tried, when the Court House was surrounded by soldiers and citizens stored their weapons in an improvised 'armory' before entering the Court House."

      1903 MAGAZINE ARTICLE ON ANDERSON FLOYD BYRD
      Researched by Timothy J. Barron, updated February 7, 2015

      The following appeared in "Everybody's Magazine - Volume 9" in an article titled "Heroes of the Hour" by Frederick North, from 1903, on pages 474 to 475:

      "A hero of a different opportunity is Anderson Floyd Byrd, attorney for the Commonwealth of Breathitt County, who has thrust himself into the centre of a Kentucky feud, and made a brave stand for law and order in a community where murder has long gone unpunished and unrecorded. In this case the feud was not the series of romantic and chivalrous duels fiction would lead us to expect, but a matter of promiscuous shooting in the back by hired assassins. And the price was not exorbitant. A popular witticism of Breathitt County typified the system: "Here is $5, go kill my man and bring back the change.""

      "The famous Hargis-Cockrell feud, that gave Byrd his chance, had remote sources back in the sixties, and has cost some forty lives, coming to a climax in the murder of Judge James B. Marcum, last May."

      "The Jett-White trial that followed betrayed the state of the community; no one wanted to bear witness, to open his lips on the subject, even the newspapers showing plainly that they were intimidated. Marcum would have been put away with a perfunctory show of justice and no consequences if Prosecuting Attorney Byrd had not taken up the crime with so vehement a grip. That his life was in hourly danger he knew beyond question, but he took few precautions and went single-heartedly about his business of restoring the honor of his county. The supreme test of his character came when he stood up to arraign the prisoners at the bar, knowing that every vigorous word against them and their possible backers was a future bullet in wait for his own life; and he met it with a courage the whole country has risen to applaud. These were bold words to fling at powerful citizens: 'I want to give warning to you and all of your followers that your bloodthirsty duels must stop in Breathitt County. . . . God knows the day has got to come when the arch assassins, the men who are the controlling powers behind the Jetts and Whites, will be exposed to the world; and either sent to the prison or to the noose.'"

      "In his address to the jury, Byrd was tense with emotion, the righteous anger of a crusader against injustice: 'Gentlemen, you are on trial as well as Jett and White, and you must answer to the bar of public opinion as well as to the bar of the Breathitt Criminal Court. You have got to do your duty or be pilloried by public opinion... I am not afraid of any threats, because I believe the men are guilty, and at any time I am ready to face my Maker with these words on my lips, 'Curt Jett, Tom White, you are guilty of murdering James Marcum.'"

      "One obstinate juror kept Jett from the rope. So far Byrd has failed to hang these two men. But, whatever their fate may yet be, daylight, the first element of reform, has been let into Breathitt County. Byrd may yet meet the penalty of his fine courage; but the day of hired assassins is over when they pay at the gallows for their work."

      "Byrd is not yet forty, the son of a farmer, who, with small opportunities, made himself school-teacher and then lawyer. Keen-eyed, blunt, eloquent in his sincerity, he is marked by nature "leading citizen," and has proved his title, to the lasting welfare of Kentucky."

      1908 NEWSPAPER ARTICLE ON ANDERSON FLOYD BYRD
      Researched by Timothy J. Barron, updated February 7, 2015

      The following appeared in the Breathitt County News newspaper from Jackson, Breathitt County, Kentucky, on June 5, 1908, on page 2: "For Congress: We are authorized to announce A.F. Byrd as a candidate for Congress for the Tenth Kentucky District, subject to the action of the Democratic part."

      1910 CENSUS OF THE ANDERSON FLOYD BYRD FAMILY
      Researched by Timothy J. Barron, updated February 7, 2015

      The U.S. Census enumerated on April 27, 1910 shows the family living in Winchester, Clark County, Kentucky: Anderson F. Byrd, head of household, male, white, age 45, married (first) 22 years, born in Kentucky, father born in Tennessee, mother born in Kentucky, occupation: lawyer, can read, can write; Emma Byrd, wife, female, white, age 44, married (first) 22 years, 6 children born, 5 children living, born in Kentucky, father born in Virginia, mother born in Virginia, can read, can write; Bessie Byrd, daughter, female, white, age 22, single, born in Kentucky, father born in Kentucky, mother born in Kentucky, can read, can write, attending school; Carl Byrd, son, male, white, age 17, single, born in Kentucky, father born in Kentucky, mother born in Kentucky, can read, can write, attending school; Burnie Byrd, son, male, white, age 15, single, born in Kentucky, father born in Kentucky, mother born in Kentucky, can read, can write, attending school; Herbert Byrd, son, male, white, age 12, single, born in Kentucky, father born in Kentucky, mother born in Kentucky, can read, can write, attending school; Daisy Byrd, daughter, female, white, age 8, single, born in Kentucky, father born in Kentucky, mother born in Kentucky, can read, can write, attending school.

      1912 BIOGRAPHY OF ANDERSON FLOYD BYRD
      Researched by Timothy J. Barron, updated February 7, 2015

      The following biography appeared in the book "History of Kentucky and Kentuckians: The Leaders and Representative Men in Commerce, Industry and Modern Activities, Volume 3" by E. Polk Johnson, published in 1912, on page 1373:

      "Anderson Floyd Byrd - The biography of the subject is that of a man who in the prime of life has won most honorable distinction for himself, is interested in many important projects and has a large law practice, all of which he has gained by his own exertions."

      "Anderson Floyd Byrd, an attorney of Winchester, Kentucky, was born in Wolfe county, Kentucky, January 22, 1864, the son of Anderson C. and Lucinda (Stamper) Byrd, the father of a native of Hancock county, Tennessee, born in June, 1841, and the mother a native of Harland county, Kentucky, born in October, 1840, and both still living on a farm in Clark county, Kentucky. They are the parents of eight children, six of whom are still living: Matilda A., wife of G. W. Halsey, a resident of Montgomery county, Kentucky; Lou Ellen, wife of Joseph Chambers, a resident of Wolfe county, Kentucky; Sarah, wife of Ben Sewell, an ex-state senator of the thirty-fourth district, Wolfe county, Kentucky; John G., of Montana; William Letcher, of Clark county, Kentucky; and the subject, who is the eldest of the family. The father of our subject came to Kentucky in 1845 and located in what was then Morgan county. He was a son of John Byrd, a native of Virginia, who removed early to Tennessee, and thence to Kentucky in 1845. Our subject's father received a good education in public and private schools and spent years of his life teaching school. In 1872 he was county superintendent of schools of Wolfe county, serving one term. He removed to Clark county a number of years ago, where he now resides."

      "Anderson Floyd Byrd was reared on a farm in Wolfe county, attended the public and high schools of Campton, Kentucky, and began teaching when he was fourteen years of age, following that pursuit for eight years. He then entered mercantile business in Morgan county, Kentucky, married and removed to Campton, Kentucky, where he engaged in business for a time, during which he read law and began practicing in July, 1887. In 1890 Mr. Byrd attended the University at Louisville, Kentucky, and graduated in 1891 in law and from that time on he has made steady advancement in business. In 1893 he was elected superintendent of schools of Wolfe county and held this position until January, 1898. In November, 1897, he was elected commonwealth attorney of the twenty-third judicial district, comprising the counties of Wolfe, Lee, Estill, Breathitt and Magoffin which position he held for one term of six years. In October, 1893, Mr. Byrd removed to Winchester and formed a law partnership with E. S. Jouett, later became a member of the law firm of Jouett, Byrd and Jouett, but after two years the firm became Byrd and S. T. Davis, and in January, 1910, was changed to Byrd and Jefferies."

      "In August, 1910, Mr. Byrd received the Democratic nomination for congress from the tenth district. He is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and he and his family are communicants at the Methodist Episcopal church, South. In politics he has always been a Democrat. Mr. Byrd is interested in various other concerns besides his attention to his profession. He owns and operates two hundred and forty acres of farm land in Clarke county, is interested in Virginia coal land, is attorney for the Hartford Coal and Mining Company and for a time was interested in developing oil and gas fields of Wolfe county."

      "Mr. Byrd, on March 3, 1887, married Emma Elkins, born in March, 1865, in Wolfe county, Kentucky, a daughter of Jeremiah and Esther (Richmond) Elkins, both natives of Lee county, Virginia. To Mr. and Mrs. Byrd have been born six children: Bessie, Carl, Burnie, Herbert and Daisy J., all of whom are at home and one child, Clifford, who died in infancy. Mr. Byrd is to be congratulated upon his fine family and splendid prospects."

      1920 CENSUS OF THE ANDERSON FLOYD BYRD FAMILY
      Researched by Timothy J. Barron, updated February 7, 2015

      The U.S. Census enumerated on January 2, 1920 shows the family living at 123 Forest Avenue in Lexington, Fayette County, Kentucky: A.F. Byrd, head of household, male, white, age 53, married, can read, can write, born in Kentucky, father born in Kentucky, mother born in Kentucky, occupation: lawyer; Emma Byrd, wife, female, white, age 54, married, can read, can write, born in Kentucky, father born in Kentucky, mother born in Kentucky; Daisy Byrd, daughter, female, white, age 18, single, attending school, can read, can write, born in Kentucky, father born in Kentucky, mother born in Kentucky.

      1922 BIOGRAPHY OF ANDERSON FLOYD BYRD
      Researched by Timothy J. Barron, updated February 7, 2015

      The following appeared the book "Kentucky" by the American Historical Society, published in 1922, pages 53 to 56:

      "Standing out distinctly as one of the central figures in the legal circles of Kentucky is the name of Anderson Floyd Byrd, of Lexington. Prominent is his profession and equally so in public matters beyond the confines of his own jurisdiction, with a reputation in one of the most exacting of professions that has for him a name for distinguished service second to none of his contemporaries, there is today no more prominent or influential man in the state which he has long honored by his citizenship. Achieving enviable success in the courts of his state and bringing to every case with which he has been connected a clearness of perception and ready power of analysis characteristics of the learned lawyer, his name and work for years have been allied with the legal institutions, public enterprises and political interests of the state in such a way as to earn his recognition as one of the distinguished citizens in a locality noted for the high order of its talent."

      "Anderson Floyd Byrd was born in Wolf County, Kentucky, on the 22d day of January, 1864, and is the son of Anderson C. and Lucinda (Stamper) Byrd, both of whom are still living. He was educated in the common schools of Wolf County and in a select school at Campton and afterward attended the law department of the University of Louisville and graduated in 1892. In July, 1887, he had obtained a license to practice law, and was thus engaged in Wolf and adjoining counties. After his graduation he located at Campton, and practiced there until moving to Winchester. Prior to this he was elected commonwealth attorney of the Twenty-third Judicial District, composed of Breathitt, Estell, Lee, McGuffin and Wolf counties, and held that office one term of six years before moving to Winchester. Up to the time he began he practice of law he taught in the public and select schools of Wolf County, and in 1892 was elected county superintendent of schools of Wolf County and served as such for one term."

      "In 1903 Mr. Byrd located in Winchester, where he successfully engaged in the practice of his profession until August, 1911, when he came to Lexington and has since resided here, and has been closely identified with much of the most important litigation in the local courts. He maintains well equipped offices in the Trust Building in this city, and also has offices in Jackson. His field of practice is extensive, covering some thirty-six counties in Eastern and Central Kentucky. He devotes himself to general practice, specializing in real estate and criminal law, in both branches of which he has been long recognized as preeminent, having been retained in some of the most celebrated cases in the recent court history of this state, among them the Callahan and Hargis murder cases. After the Callahan murder he was retained by the Callahan family to prosecute those charged with the murder, and he secured the conviction of four of the accused men. He was also employed by the brother of James Hargis to prosecute Beach Hargis, a son of the murdered man, and who was accused of the murder of his father, the result of the trial being his conviction and life sentence. By a straightforward and honorable course Mfr. Byrd has built up a large and lucrative legal business, with commensurate financial results. Years of conscientious work have brought with them not only increase of practice and reputation, but also that growth in legal knowledge and that wide and accurate judgment the possession of which constitutes marked excellence in the profession. In discussions of the principles of law lie is noted for clearness of statement and candor; he seeks faithfully for firm ground and having once found it nothing can drive him from his position. In the trial of cases he is uniformly courteous to court and opposing counsel, caring little for display, never losing a point for the purpose of creating an impression, but seeking to impress the jury rather by weight of facts in his favor and by clear, logical argument than by appeal to passion or prejudice."

      "Mr. Byrd was married to Emma Elkins, who has borne him six children, one of whom, Clifford, died in infancy. Those living are Bessie M., Carl Beacher, Burnie Beck, Herbert Elkins and Daisy Jewell. Bessie is the wife of C. T. Roszell, and they are the parents of a daughter, Kathryn Byrd. Carl B. was a lieutenant in the Philippine constabulary from September, 1915, up to May, 1917, when he entered the First Officers' Training Camp at Fort Benjamin Harrison, Indianapolis, Indiana, where he received a commission as second lieutenant in the United States army. He was then assigned to the historic old Seventh Cavalry at Fort Bliss, Texas. This regiment was listed for overseas duty, but on account of the trouble with Mexico they were retained on the Mexican border. Finally he was released from that regiment and was sent to a special officers' training school at Columbus, Georgia, and while there was detailed for duty at Archangel, Russia, as assistant attache to the intelligence division of the army. On his arrival at Washington, District of Columbia, on account of conditions at Archangel he was sent to Bucharest, Romania, on, the same service, sailing from the United States on April, 1920, and is now with the Twelfth Cavalry at Del Rio, Texas. Burnie B., who married Ethel Barnes, is now living in Lexington, Kentucky, where he is connected with the McCormick Lumber Company. Herbert E., who married Lola Campbell, is now connected with the Lexington Herald. During the World war he was a member of Base Hospital No. 40, known as Borows Hospital Unit. Daisy J. married R. M. Guthrie, of Elizabethtown, Kentucky."

      "Politically Mr. Byrd is an ardent supporter of the democratic party and takes an active interest in public affairs. His religious faith is that of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, of which he is a member and a teacher of the Bible class in the Sunday school. He is a member of the Kentucky Bar Association. As a citizen he is public spirited and enterprising to an unwonted degree; as a friend and neighbor he combines the qualities of head and heart that win confidence and command respect; while as an attorney he has brought honor and dignity to his profession."

      "Before closing this review it would be of undoubted interest to give specific reference to the ancestral history of Mr. Byrd's family. On the paternal side he traces his descent from Col. William Byrd, who came from England to America in the seventeenth century, locating at Westover, near Richmond, Virginia. The plantation of Westover finds place in the annals of Colonial history as early as 1622. The original grant was made to Sir John Paulet. Theodorick Bland was the next owner. An Englishman by birth, he was a Spanish merchant before he emigrated to Virginia. He established himself at Westover, where he gave ten acres of land, a courthouse and a prison to Charles City County, and built a church for the parish which occupies a portion of the graveyard on his plantation. He was buried in the chancel, a sunken, horizontal slab bearing his name now marking the site of the sacred edifice."

      "This estate came into prominence under the regime of the Byrds. Henning, in his 'Statutes at Large,' spells the name 'Bird.' Family tradition claims descent from Le Bird who entered England in the time of William the Conqueror, and it transmits an ancient ballad, beginning 'My father from the Norman shire With Royal William come.'"

      "The first American representative of the family, William Byrd, was born in London in 1653 and settled in Virginia as a merchant and planter as early as 1674. He bought Westover from the Blands, and died there in 1704. He held the office of Receiver-General of the Royal Revenue at the time of his death. His son, William Evelyn Byrd, succeeded to the proprietorship when thirty years of age, having been born on March 28, 1674. Two years later he married a daughter of Daniel Parke. She died of smallpox in England in 1716, leaving two daughters, Evelyn, who never married, and Wilhelmina, who became the wife of William Chamberlayne, of Virginia."

      "Colonel Byrd's second wife was Maria Taylor, an English heiress, and with her he returned to his native land after a sojourn of some years abroad - His father had built a house at Westover in 1690. The son proceeded now to build a greater one, choosing the finest natural location on the James River. The dwelling, which was constructed of English brick, consisted of one large central house, connected by corridors with small wings, and was underrun by cellars that are models of solidity and spaciousness."

      "The sloping town was defended against the wash of the current by a river wall of massive masonry, while at regular intervals buttresses capped with stone, supported statues of life size. Gardens, fences, outhouses and conservatories were evidences of the owner's tastes and means. His estate was said to have been a 'principality,' and was augmented by his second wife's large fortune, which included valuable landed property in the neighborhood of London. Within his palatial abode were collected the treasures brought from England and the continent, and among the pictures were portraits now preserved at Lower and Upper Brandon, being removed to those houses when Westover passed out of the Byrd family. A portrait list taken from a Westover manuscript is herewith given."

      "Portrait of Sir Wilfred Lawson, by Sir Godfrey Kneller, One of a progenitor of the Byrd family, by Vandyke. Duke of Argyle (Jennie Dean's friend), Lord Orrery and Sir Charles Wager, an English admiral. Miss Blount, celebrated by Pope. Mary, Duchess of Montagne, daughter of the Earl of Marlboro and wife of John, fourth Duke of Montagne. Governor Daniel Parke, Mrs. Lucy Parke Byrd and her daughter Evelyn. Colonel Byrd and his second wife, Miss Taylor. The daughter of the second Colonel Byrd, William Evelyn, second of the 'Byrd of Westover' name and title and the most eminent of the life. One historian says of him: 'A vast fortune enabled him to live in a style of hospitable splendor before unknown in Virginia. His extensive training was improved by keen observation, and refined by an acquaintance and correspondence with the wits and noblemen of his day in England. His writings are among the most valuable that have descended from his era.' Another: 'He was one of the brightest stars of the social skies of Colonial Virginia. All desirable traits seem to combine in him; personal beauty, elegant manners, literary culture and the greatest gayety of disposition. Never was there a livelier companion, and his wit and humor seemed to flow in an unfailing stream. It is a species of jovial grand seignor and easy master of all the graces we see in the person of this author-planter on the banks of James river.'"

      "The author of the Westover manuscript still further says: 'We may fancy the worthy planter in ruffles and powder, leaning back in his arm-chair at Westover, and dictating, with a smile on his lips, the gay pages to his secretary. The smile may be seen today on the face of his portraits-a face of remarkable personal beauty, framed in the curls of a flowing peruke of the time of Queen Anne.'"

      "'His path through life was a path of roses. He had wealth, culture, the best private library in America, social consideration, and hosts of friends, and when he went to sleep under his monument in the garden at Westover he left behind not only a reputation of a good citizen, but that of a great Virginia wit and author of the century.'"

      "The testimony of the monument is exhaustive, fore-stalling, one might suppose the necessity of any other post-mortem memorial: 'Here lieth the honorable William Byrd, Esq. Being born to one of the amplest fortunes in this country, he was sent early to England for his education, where, under the care of Sir Robert Southwell, and ever favored with his particular instructions, he made a proficiency of polite and various learning. By the means of the same noble friend he was introduced to the acquaintance of many of the first persons of that age for knowledge, wit, virtue, birth or high station, and particularly contracted a most intimate and bosom friendship with the learned and illustrious Charles Boyle, Earl of Orrery. He was called to Loche bar in the Middle Temple; studied for some time in the low countries; visited the Court of France, and was chosen Fellow of the Royal Society. Thus eminently fitted for the service and ornament of his country, he was made Receiver-General of His Majesty's Revenues here; was thrice appointed public agent to the Court and Ministry of England; and, being thirty-seven years a member, at last became president of the Convert of this colony. To all this were added a great eloquence of taste and life, the well-bred gentleman and polite companion, the splendid economist, and prudent father of a family; withal, the constant enemy of all exorbitant power, and hearty friend to the liberties of his country.'"

      "A catalogue of his books is in the Franklin Library, Philadelphia. He also advertised in the Virginia Gazette of April, 1737: 'That on the North Side of James River, near the upper landing and a little below the Falls, is lately laid off by Major Mayo a town called Richmond, with streets sixty feet wide, in a pleasant situation and well supplied with springs of good water. It lieth near the public warehouse at Shoccoe's,' etc."

      "In his Journal of I733 he says: 'We laid the foundation of two large cities, one at Shoccoes to be called Richmond, and the other at the point of Appomattox, to be called Petersburg.'"

      "Truly the good this man did was not interred with his bones. The portrait of his daughter, known in family tradition as 'The Fair Evelyn,' hangs next to that of her superb parent. The painter represents Evelyn Byrd as a beautiful young woman, with exquisite complexion and hands, the latter busied on binding wild flowers about a shepherdess hat. The fashion of her satin gown is simple and becoming to a slender figure; a rose is set among the dark curls on the left temple ; a scarlet bird is perched in the shrubbery at her right. The features are regular, the forehead broad, the hair arching prettily above it; the nose is straight; the lips are rosy, ripe and lightly closed. The round of cheek and chin is exquisite. The great brown eyes are sweet and serious. It is a lovely face-gentle, smooth and winning, but not strong except in capacity for suffering."

      "William Byrd took his children abroad to be educated, accompanying them on their voyage and paying them several visits during their pupilage. In due time Evelyn was presented at Court. One of the Brandon relics is the fan used by her on that momentous occasion, the sticks of which are of carved ivory, creamy with age. On kid, once white, now yellow, is painted a pastoral scene-shepherdess and swain, pet spaniel, white sheep, green bank and nodding cowslips under a rose pink sky. They delighted in these violent contrasts with the gilded artificiality of court life in Queen Anne's day. We hold the fragile toy with reverent fingers; one can almost discern faint, lingering thrills along the delicately wrought ivory of the joyous tumult of pulses beating high with love and ambition."

      "One of the many traditions that lead the imagination easily on to the reconstruction of the romantic biography of William the Great of Westover is that when he presented his wife, Lucy Parke, at the Court of His Hanoverian Majesty, George I, her charms so melted the Dutch phlegm of the monarch that he asked the proud husband if "there were many other as beautiful birds in the forests of America.' Another version of the anecdote puts the speech into the mouth of George II and makes the occasion that of the fair Evelyn's presentation. All family annalists agree in saying that the daughter's London sojourn in the year starred by her appearance at court was also made memorable by her meeting Charles Mordaunt, the grandson of Lord Peterborough. This young man fell in love with her, and was loved in return as absolutely and as passionately as if the fan pastoral were a sketch from nature, and they the fair Chloe and Strephon. Lord Peterborough, the grandfather, was a shining figure in the diplomatic, military and social world of his day, which was a long one. He outlived his son, and was succeeded in his title and estates by his grandson in 1733. Those of William Evelyn Byrd's biographers who have discredited the love story on the ground of disparity of age between Swift, Pope, Arbuthnot and Gay and the lovely America?s debutante have been led into the doubt by overlooking the genealogical facts I have given. The hapless pair might have known better, if lovers ever know anything, than to follow blindly whither love leads."

      "Whatever the cynical Earl of Peterborough thought of the pretty entanglement the potentate of Westover had reasons, weighty, if not many, for taking part in the drama. The Peterboroughs were leading Roman Catholics. The jovial grand seignor and easy master of all graces was the stanchest of Protestant Churchmen. The polished courtier smiling at us from the drawing room wall of Brandoin wore quite another aspect when he entered Cymbeline to the plighted twain, and 'Like the tyrannous breathing of the North, Shook all their buds from blowing.;"

      "The fair Evelyn was brought back to Westover, with her secret buried so deep in her heart that it ate it out. This may have had something to do with the low, nervous state into which she fell. Unconsciously she may have pined for London gayeties in the uneventful routine of plantation life. The story asserts that the brown, deep eyes grew wistful with thoughts of her lover they were never more to see, her soul sick unto death to be with him. 'Refusing all offers to be with other gentlemen, she died of a broken heart,' is the simple record. We learn, furthermore, that the author-planter bore himself remorselessly while the decline went on. If he did not bid her-to quote again from the play that must be among his catalogued books 'Languish a drop of blood a day, and being aged, Die of his folly,' he stuck fast to his purpose not to let her wed the popish nobleman. He gave no other reason for his tyranny than this to the public, whatever his young daughter and the young peer who, some say, followed her to America, may know of other and yet weightier objections to the alliance. There are rumors, that can be neither verified nor denied, of early feuds between the Mordaunts and the haughty first gentleman of Virginia, whose stout adherence to principle or prejudice cost his favorite child her life."

      "In this connection occurs another family anecdote. It was the habit of the Berkley Harrisons and the Westover Byrds often to take tea together in the summer weather in a grove on the dividing line between the two plantations. Butlers and footmen carried equipage and provisions to the trysting place, set them in order, and waited on the party. One afternoon before Evelyn's death as she and her dearest friend and confidante, Sweet Anne Harrison, the wife of the then owner of Berkley, were slowly climbing the slight ascent to the rendezvous, the girl promised to meet her companion sometimes on the way, after she had passed out of the other's sight. Accordingly, on a certain lovely evening in the following spring, as Mrs. Harrison walked slowly and sadly down the hill, she saw her late friend, dressed in white and dazzling in ethereal loveliness, standing beside her own tombstone. She fluttered forward a few steps, kissed her hand to the beholder, smiling joyously, and tenderly vanished. The inscription on this simple tombstone is assuredly not the composition of the Westover manuscript, but it is here given verbatim:"

      "Here in the sleep of peace,
      Reposes the body
      Of Miss Evelyn Byrd: Daughter
      Of the Honorable Byrd, Eq.:
      The various and excellent Endowments
      Of nature; improved and Perfected,
      By an accomplished education;
      Formed her for the happiness of her Friends For an Ornament of her Country.
      Alas, Reader!
      We can detain nothing However valued
      From unrelentless Death:
      Beauty, Fortune, or exalted Honour,
      See here a proof.
      And be reminded by this Awful Tomb:
      That every worldly comfort Fleets away: Excepting only what arises,
      From imitating the virtues of our friends;
      And the contemplation of their Happiness.
      To which God was pleased to call this lady On the 13th, day of November, 1737
      In the 29th, year of her Age."

      "On the right of Evelyn Byrd's tomb is one of like size and shape, which guards the remains of her grand mother. An oddly arranged inscription, running sometimes around the flat top, sometimes across it, records that she was "Mary Byrd, late wife of William Byrd, Eisq." (They never left the "Esq." off, however cramped for room.) "Daughter of Warehouseman, Esq., who died on the 9th, day of November 1699, in the 47th, year of her age." Her husband lies beside her, a Latin epitaph registering the provincial offices held from the Crown, and his demise: '4th, die Decem- bris, 1704 post quam vicisset 52 annos.'"

      1930 CENSUS OF THE ANDERSON FLOYD BYRD FAMILY
      Researched by Timothy J. Barron, updated February 7, 2015

      The U.S. Census enumerated on April 10, 1930 shows the couple living at 231 McDowell Road in Lexington, Fayette County, Kentucky: A. Floyd Byrd, head of household, male, white, age 66, married at age 23, can read and write, born in Kentucky, father born in Tennessee, mother born in Tennessee, occupation: attorney; Emma Byrd, wife, female, white, age 65, married at age 22, can read and write, born in Kentucky, father born in Virginia, mother born in Virginia, occupation: none.

      1933 DEATH OF EMMA BYRD
      Researched by Timothy J. Barron, updated February 7, 2015

      The Kentucky Death Index, 1911-2000 lists the following record: "Name: Emma Byrd, Death Date: 31 Dec 1933, Death Place: Fayette, Age: 68, Volume: 57, Certificate: 28412."

      The Kentucky, Death Records, 1852-1953 lists the following record: "Name: Mrs Emma Elkins Byrd, Death Date: 31 Dec 1933, Death Location: Fayette, Kentucky, USA, Age: 68, Gender: Female, Race: White, Birth Date: 6 Mar 1865, Birth Location: Wolf Wolfe, Kentucky, Spouse's Name: A Floyd Byrd, Father's name: Jeremia Elkins, Father's Birth Location: Virginia, Mother's name: Esther Elkins, Mother's Birth Location: Virginia."

      The following information was transcribed from the actual document: "Place of Death: Good Samaritan Hospital, Lexington, Fayette County, Kentucky; Name: Mrs. Emma Elkins Byrd, 231 McDowell Road; Sex: Female; Race: White; Marital: Married; Spouse: A. Floyd Byrd; Born: March 6, 1865 in Wolf [sic - Wolfe] County, Kentucky; Age: 68; Occupation: At Home; Father: Jeremia [sic - Jeremiah] Elkins, born in Virginia; Mother Maiden: Esther Elkins, born in Virginia; Informant: A. Floyd Byrd, 231 McDowell Road; Burial: Lexington Cemetery, January 2, 1933; Date of Death: December 31, 1933; Cause of Death: Coronary Thrombosis, Acute Nephritis."

      The Find A Grave Index lists the following record: "Name: Emma Byrd, Birth Date: 6 Mar 1865, Death Date: 1 Jan 1934, Cemetery: Lexington Cemetery, Burial or Cremation Place: Lexington, Fayette County, Kentucky, USA, Spouse: Anderson Floyd Byrd, Children: Claude Clifford Byrd." She is buried in the Lexington Cemetery in Lexington, Fayette County, Kentucky, Plot: Section 6; Lot 2. The headstone reads as follows: "Emma Elkins; Wife of A. Floyd Byrd; Mar. 6, 1865 - Jan. 1, 1934."

      1933 DEATH OF ANDERSON FLOYD BYRD
      Researched by Timothy J. Barron, updated February 7, 2015

      The Kentucky Death Index, 1911-2000 lists the following record: "Name: Anderson F Byrd, Death Date: 6 Sep 1939, Death Place: Fayette, Age: 76, Volume: 45, Certificate: 22154."

      The Kentucky, Death Records, 1852-1953 lists the following record: "Name: Anderson Floyd Byrd, Death Date: 6 Sep 1939, Death Location: Fayette, Kentucky, USA, Age: 75, Gender: Male, Race: White, Birth Date: 22 Jan 1864, Birth Location: Wolfe, Kentucky, Spouse's Name: Mrs Minerva Fetham Byrd, Father's name: Anderson C Byrd, Father's Birth Location: Kentucky, Mother's name: Lucinda Stamper, Mother's Birth Location: Kentucky."

      The following information was transcribed from the actual document: "Place of Death: Lexington, Fayette County, Kentucky; Name: Anderson Floyd Byrd; Residence; 231 McDowell Road; Sex: Male; Race: White; Marital: Married; Spouse: Mrs. Minerva Fetham Byrd; Born: January 22, 1864 in Wolfe County, Kentucky; Age: 76; Occupation: Lawyer; Father: Anderson O. Byrd, born in Kentucky; Mother Maiden: Lucinda Stamper, born in Kentucky; Informant: Bernie B. Byrd, 218 South Limestone Street; Burial: Lexington Cemetery, September 9, 1939; Date of Death: September 6, 1939; Cause of Death: Hypertension Heart Disease, Coronary Occlusion."

      The Find A Grave Index lists the following record: "Name: Anderson Floyd Byrd, Birth Date: 22 Jan 1864, Death Date: 6 Sep 1939, Cemetery: Lexington Cemetery, Burial or Cremation Place: Lexington, Fayette County, Kentucky, USA, Spouse: Emma Byrd, Children: Claude Clifford Byrd." He is buried in the Lexington Cemetery in Lexington, Fayette County, Kentucky, Plot: Section 6; Lot 2. The headstone reads as follows: "Anderson Floyd Byrd, Jan. 22, 1864, Sept. 6, 1939."
    Children
    1. Has No Children Claude Clifford Byrd b: 4 DEC 1887 in Wolfe County, Kentucky, USA
    2. Has Children Besse Myrtle Byrd b: 29 MAR 1889 in Wolfe County, Kentucky, USA
    3. Has Children Carl Beecher Byrd b: 6 AUG 1892 in Wolfe County, Kentucky, USA
    4. Has No Children Burnie Beck Byrd b: 17 JUN 1895 in Campton, Wolfe County, Kentucky, USA
    5. Has No Children Herbert Elkin Byrd b: 7 OCT 1897 in Kentucky, USA
    6. Has Children Daisy Jewell Byrd b: 20 JUL 1901 in Kentucky

    Sources:
    1. Author: Ancestry.com
      Title: 1870 United States Federal Census
      Publication: Name: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc.; Location: Provo, UT, USA; Date: 2009;
      Repository:
        Name: Ancestry.com

      Page: Year: 1870; Census Place: Precinct 3, Wolfe, Kentucky; Roll: M593_504; Page: 435B; Image: 294; Family History Library Film: 552003
    2. Author: Ancestry.com and The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
      Title: 1880 United States Federal Census
      Publication: Name: Ancestry.com Operations Inc; Location: Provo, UT, USA; Date: 2010;
      Repository:
        Name: Ancestry.com

      Page: Year: 1880; Census Place: Precinct 5, Wolfe, Kentucky; Roll: 446; Family History Film: 1254446; Page: 304B; Enumeration District: 117; Image: 0597
    3. Author: Ancestry.com
      Title: Kentucky, Death Records, 1852-1963
      Publication: Name: Ancestry.com Operations Inc; Location: Provo, UT, USA; Date: 2007;
      Repository:
        Name: Ancestry.com

      Note:
      <ul><li>Kentucky. <i>Kentucky Birth, Marriage and Death Records ? Microfilm (1852-1910)</i>. Microfilm rolls #994027-994058. Kentucky Department for Libraries and Archives, Frankfort, Kentucky.</li><li>Kentucky. <i>Birth and Death Records: Covington, Lexington, Louisville, and Newport ? Microfilm (before 1911)</i>. Microfilm rolls #7007125-7007131, 7011804-7011813, 7012974-7013570, 7015456-7015462. Kentucky Department for Libraries and Archives, Frankfort, Kentucky.</li><li>Kentucky. <i>Vital Statistics Original Death Certificates ? Microfilm (1911-1955)</i>. Microfilm rolls #7016130-7041803. Kentucky Department for Libraries and Archives, Frankfort, Kentucky.</li></ul>
    4. Author: Ancestry.com
      Title: U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current
      Publication: Name: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc.; Location: Provo, UT, USA; Date: 2012;
      Repository:
        Name: Ancestry.com
    5. Author: Ancestry.com
      Title: 1930 United States Federal Census
      Publication: Name: Ancestry.com Operations Inc; Location: Provo, UT, USA; Date: 2002;
      Repository:
        Name: Ancestry.com

      Page: Year: 1930; Census Place: Lexington, Fayette, Kentucky; Roll: 743; Page: 7B; Enumeration District: 0018; Image: 781.0; FHL microfilm: 2340478
    6. Author: Ancestry.com
      Title: 1910 United States Federal Census
      Publication: Name: Ancestry.com Operations Inc; Location: Provo, UT, USA; Date: 2006;
      Repository:
        Name: Ancestry.com

      Page: Year: 1910; Census Place: Winchester Ward 5, Clark, Kentucky; Roll: T624_468; Page: 11A; Enumeration District: 0033; FHL microfilm: 1374481
    7. Author: Ancestry.com
      Title: 1920 United States Federal Census
      Publication: Name: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc.; Location: Provo, UT, USA; Date: 2010;
      Repository:
        Name: Ancestry.com

      Note:
      Fourteenth Census of the United States, 1920. (NARA microfilm publication T625, 2076 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C. For details on the contents of the film numbers, visit the following NARA web page: <a href="http://www.archives.gov/publications/microfilm-catalogs/census/1920/part-07.html" target="_blank">NARA</a>. Note: Enumeration Districts 819-839 are on roll 323 (Chicago City).
      Page: Year: 1920; Census Place: Lexington Ward 4, Fayette, Kentucky; Roll: T625_569; Page: 3A; Enumeration District: 66; Image: 240
    8. Author: Ancestry.com
      Title: 1900 United States Federal Census
      Publication: Name: Ancestry.com Operations Inc; Location: Provo, UT, USA; Date: 2004;
      Repository:
        Name: Ancestry.com

      Page: Year: 1900; Census Place: Campton, Wolfe, Kentucky; Roll: 555; Page: 3B; Enumeration District: 0094; FHL microfilm: 1240555
    9. Author: Ancestry.com
      Title: Kentucky Death Index, 1911-2000
      Publication: Name: Ancestry.com Operations Inc; Location: Provo, UT, USA; Date: 2000;
      Repository:
        Name: Ancestry.com
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