Hinchliffe_Docksey_Schoffel_Harris_Plos_Beinat_Dolan_Guy FAMILIES

Entries: 16182    Updated: 2014-07-26 03:39:03 UTC (Sat)    Contact: T Hinchliffe

Compiled by T Hinchliffe 2013

Index | Descendancy | Register | Download GEDCOM | Public Profile | Add Post-em

  • ID: I2015
  • Name: Joseph Hinchcliff
  • Given Name: Joseph
  • Surname: Hinchcliff
  • Name: Hinchcliffe
  • Given Name:
  • Surname: Hinchcliffe
  • Sex: M
  • Birth: Abt 1767 in Yorkshire, England, UK. 1
  • Death: Abt 1820-1841 in West Riding, Yorkshire, England, UK. of Injuries resulting from cart accident. 2 2
  • _UID: 4E1130C06C6A4FBDA1A3A11ADEA13FB2A0E8
  • Change Date: 27 May 2014 at 10:05
  • Note:
    West Yorkshire, England, Baptisms, Marriages and Burials, 1512-1812
    Name: Joseph Hinchcliff
    Marriage Date: 6 Jun 1803
    Parish: Kirkburton, All Hallows
    Spouse's Name: Mary Mitchel
    Witness: John Mitchell, Joseph Mitchell
    Minister: John Mattinson

    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    No clear information existed on Joseph's Parents or death.

    Joseph's occupation listed on Joshua's 1st marriage cert. was a Carter.

    Joseph is said to own and ran a woolen mill at Holmfirth, West Riding, Yorkshire, England, UK.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    One author determined his birth as Cir 1767. (AFN:J3T2-0L)

    Reference:
    FamilySearch website (http://www.familysearch.org/ )
    Submitter(s):
    PATRICIA ALLEN
    1474 SO PIERSON ST #64
    LAKEWOOD CO
    USA 80232
    Microfilm: NONE
    Submission: AF91-100713

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    "Grandfather (Joseph Hinchliffe) was a manufacturer of woolen cloth. He had people working for him and must have owned some kind of a mill in which to produce his goods. It was always stated with pride that Grandfather's cloth was always on sale in the Huddersfield market for a period of 40 (forty) years, It was all Manufactured by hand looms and hand machinery. When the Spinning Jinney and power looms were invented it was ruination to all hand production and I understand that our Grandfather became poor then being unable to compete with machine work. His death came by accident through being thrown from the top of loaded wagon - as best I can remember".

    THE HINCHLIFFE FAMILY
    RELATIONS OF JOSEPH HINCHLIFFE OF ELKLON, MARYLAND, U.S.A.
    By Joseph Hinchliffe Perkins. August 30th, 1949.

    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Marriage reference: REF/AFN/500060627245: 6 June 1803 Joseph Hinchcliff and Mary Mitchell at Kirkburton Yorkshire England.

    1) Batch #: 7009321, Sheet #: 67, Source Call #: 0538418, Printout Call #: NONE, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, International Genealogical Index (R), Copyright (c) 1980, 2002, data as of August 22, 2003

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    http://www.hinchliffehome.net/name.php (David Hinchliffe)

    References which point to this place-name 'certainly pre-date the first surname evidence, e.g.
    1307 John, son of Hugh, gives 2 shillings for 2 1/4 acres at Welesbothem, and 3 roods at Heyncheclyf.

    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    From: History of the name HINCHLIFFE Compiled by Jon Hinchliffe
    Origin and Meaning

    Even at the present day the main home of this prolific family name is the southern half of the West Riding and many scores of families still live in and around those Holme Valley hamlets where the surname was first recorded 650 years ago. Although the surname is now so well known this was not always the case and all the evidence points to a single family origin in the West Riding. Even as late as 1545 the only three families recorded in the subsidy roll for the Clothing Area lived in or near Holmfirth. This is all the more remarkable if we consider that included in this area were Bradford, Leeds, Halifax, Huddersfield, Wakefield and Dewsbury, not to mention a score of minor towns. In all these places variants of Hinchliffe can now be found, often in good numbers, but the surname's expansion there is relatively recent.
    This should not be taken to mean that the Holme Valley was the only place where Hinchliffe could be found in 1545. The area in which the family had its origin and early history lies close to the watershed of the River Dearne and at a very early date migration took place over the watershed and as far south as Sheffield. Consequently much of the name's ramification over the centuries has been in the villages of Staincross Wapentake and in towns such as Penistone and Barnsley. Sheffield has, throughout most of its history, been an important centre of its distribution.

    Hinchliffe is geographical in origin and two minor place-names should be considered when we try to locate the source. There is, for example, a Hingcliff Scar in Bradfield in the South Yorkshire Pennines. Unfortunately there are very few references to this place and none at all before 1440. It might conceivably be the source of the family name but a much stronger case can be made out for the locality now known as Hinchliffe Mill. References which point to this place-name 'certainly pre-date the first surname evidence, e.g.
    1307 John, son of Hugh, gives 2 shillings for 2 1/4 acres at Welesbothem, and 3 roods at Heyncheclyf.
    As this was recorded in the court rolls for the village of Holme it would certainly seem to refer to what is now called Hinchliffe Mill. In one sense, however, indecision about which place-name gave rise to the surname is not very important, for both have the same meaning. The words 'henge-clif' in Old English signified a steep slope or cliff, a description which in fact fits both the localities we have discussed.

    Variant Forms

    Some place-names and family names vary very little throughout the centuries but this is not so with Hinchliffe. In Kirkburton Parish Registers, which cover the area where the family ramified, there are nearly 20 versions of the name ranging from Hinslife to Hynschonclyf. The group of 5 consonants resulting from Hinch + cliffe always tended to be simplified in colloquial speech, and spellings in the Registers such as Hynchyffe and Hyncleff bear testimony to this. A change of vowel produced Henchlif and an unusual metathesis in the final syllable gave rise to the unlikely Hynchylff - perhaps influenced by the nearby hamlet of Hunshelf. This does not exhaust the list of Holme Valley variants. The local pronunciation of Hinchliffe Mill was Hinchley and there is abundant evidence locally to show that the surname was treated in the same way. In Emley Parish Register, for example, we find
    1663-1667 John and Dorothy Hinchcliffe or Hinchley
    Whilst the tendency to omit the initial 'H' produced numerous variants, e.g.
    1679 Matthew Insliffe (York)
    1769 Richard Inchliffe (Huddersfield).
    Most of these varying forms were attempts by clerks to render in writing what they heard, what they thought they heard or what they thought the "correct" form was. In the Protestation Returns for 1641 the name in the Holme Valley was always Hinchliffe; a generation later in the Hearth Tax Hinscliffe prevailed, although there was one Hinchliffe and one Hincliffe. Over in the next valley there were Hinchcliffes at Longwood and Quarmby.
    This tendency to corruption, linguistic corruption I should add, endured until comparatively recent times, but in the last 100 years there have been stabilising influences and the acceptance locally of standard spellings. The prevailing spelling in the Holme Valley is now, therefore, Hinchliffe with small numbers of Hinchcliffes and Hinchliffs. However, this family had already established branches outside the West Riding as early as the l7th century and inevitably this helped to preserve some of the many variants we have mentioned. In this account I shall use the form Hinchliffe for convenience unless referring to specific documentary evidence; it should however be remembered that all the following surviving variants share the same origin:
    Hinchcliffe, Hinchcliff, Hinchecliffe, Inchcliffe,
    Hinchliffe, Hinchliff,
    Hinchsliffe, Hinchsliff, Hinsliffe, Hinsliff,
    Hincliffe, Hincklieff,
    Hinchley, Inchley,
    Henchcliffe, Henchcliff, Henchley.
    It is quite likely that an even more exhaustive search of surname lists, both in this country and overseas, will widen the range of variants and also produce hybrids where Hinchliffe has developed alongside similar names such as Hinckley.

    Early History

    The first reference to the place-name, as we have seen, occurred in 1307 when a certain John, son of Hugh rented land there. The first reference to the surname, which occurs some 17 years later in the court rolls, may also identify who this tenant was:
    1324 Thomas, son of John de Hengeclif sues John son of Hugh de Alstanley (Austonley) for trespass.
    In the next few years the name of this man appears in the manor rolls for Holme on a number of occasions, e.g.
    1325 Thomas de Hyengeclif surrenders 8 acres in Holme, committed to William de Hyengeclif - 2 shillings.
    1331 Thomas de Hiengecliff stood surety for Thomas Undirlangley who was accused of chasing Robert Chobard's cattle with his dogs.
    The only other member of the family mentioned at this period is a woman, who may well have been the widow of the John referred to. There is, however, nothing to show the exact relationship.
    1324-27 Agnes de Hyengeclif / Hengeklif / Hingecliff or Hyngecliff fined for various minor offences, i.e. for allowing her beasts to escape (3 pence) and for helping herself to wood from the Earl's forest (21 pence).
    Inevitably many family names of this type disappeared in the Middle Ages and one of the main causes was undoubtedly the disastrous plague of 1349-50, known as the Black Death. The Hinchliffes not only survived this calamity but as the Poll Tax of 1379 shows, had actually ramified in the meantime.
    1379 Holmfirth
    John de Hyncheclyff and wife. 4 pence tax.
    William de Hynchecliff and wife. 4 pence tax.
    Richard de Hynchecliff and wife. 4 pence tax.
    Cumberworth
    Adam de Hyncheclyf, a single man. 4 pence tax.
    The standard rate of tax was 4 pence and only tradesmen or gentry paid more. It seems unlikely, therefore, that the Hinchliffes of this period had any special status in the enclosed world of the Holme Valley. What is of interest is the fact that several widespread hamlets were listed under the general heading of Holmfirth and there is no way of knowing exactly where the three Hinchliffes lived. The bridge at Holme actually divided the two great parishes of Almondbury and Kirkburton, although the tendency for at least 300 years was to move south and east rather than north and west.

    Ramification and Distribution 1379-1720

    The Holme Valley
    In the period 1379-1545 the population did not increase greatly and it is not very surprising, therefore, that the surname Hinchliffe was no more numerous in the 16th century subsidy rolls than in the great Poll Tax of 1379. The period between these great nationally levied taxes was one of political confusion and civil strife, and ironically the documentary evidence for yeoman families is often much less detailed than in previous centuries. Enough survives, however, to show us that the Hinchliffe's continued to live, generation after generation, in the same area, e.g.
    1437 William Hynchclyffe of Scholes quitclaimed certain lands to Adam de Stokkes (probably living in Thurstonland).
    l490 Thomas Hynchclyff, a churchwarden for Kirkburton Parish, signed a fascinating document which records a dispute between local families respecting their rights to occupation of certain places in the church. The subsidy roll of 1524, taxing only a percentage of the population, provides us with the first hint of where the family lived:
    1524 Thomas Hynchlyff of the Crosse, taxed 12 pence on lands valued at 20 shillings.
    Robert Hynchclyffe, taxed 12 pence on goods valued at 40 shillings.
    Both these men were again listed under 'Holmfirth' but we know from a will proved in 1526 that John Hynchclif lived at Cartworth and from a second in 1541 that another John Hyncheclif lived at Holme. In the second subsidy roll four years later there were still only three members of the family in the Clothing Area, all in Holmfirth.
    1545 Thomas Hynsclyff, Holmfirth )
    William Hynchclyff, Holmfirth ) All paid 2 pence tax
    Robert Hynchclyff, Holmfirth )
    An interesting record of this period which survives, provides further illustration of how the surname varied. In the Star Chamber proceedings for 1536 John Ynchlyf or Hynclyf of Wooldale was accused of having '7 acres overmeasure and testimony was offered by Thomas Hynchclyf. A century later, extracts from the West Riding Sessions Rolls provide some insight into the different occupations in which Hinchliffes were engaged:
    l636 James Waterhouse of Holmfirth, a clothier, stole one lamb, value 2s.6d, from James Hinchcliffe.
    1658 Ambrose Hinchclyffe of Holmfirth, a carpenter, stole two ewes value 10 shillings from Francis Haighe of Penistone.
    The area of the Holme Valley in which the Hinchliffes lived was remote from the two mother churches of Kirkburton and Almondbury and a move was made in 1650 by the inhabitants of Holmfirth to have their chapel given the status of a church. They hoped thereby to escape the fines which were levied if they did not walk or ride the six or seven miles on a Sunday. The petition signed by the Holmfirth residents contained the names of six Hinchliffes - including Joseph Hinchcliffe of the Cross, Wooldale. and this hints at the expansion of numbers which had taken place in the 100 years since the subsidy roll of 1545. Actually there are two documents, the Protestation Returns of 1641 and the Hearth Tax Rolls of the l660s and 1670s, which allow more accurate estimates of the ramification to be made. The details of the first of these provide staggering evidence of the family's growth. In the whole of the Huddersfield area, 52 male Hinchliffes were recorded. The major concentrations were at
    Austonley (11), Cartworth (9), Holme (7), Hepworth (5) and Wooldale (3). All these men lived within a mile or two of their ancestors of the 1320s and many other families had not moved far afield, e.g. Fulstone (3), Meltham (3), Upperthong (2). Isolated Hinchliffes lived in Kirkburton, Thurstonland, Lepton, Longwood and Marsden.
    There is actually a surviving rental of Wakefield manor for the year 1709 which identifies in detail the land holdings of many of these Holme Valley Hinchliffes. It would be tedious to list them all but as an example we can cite James Hincliffe (sic) who paid 1 shilling for 'Good Greave' and 7 shillings and sixpence for land at 'Arunden'. He, or a namesake also held tenancies at 'Maukin House, Dunsley, Austonley, Doxon Shaw and Knowle'. Actually at this time James was not a commonly used name in the Hinchliffe family and the main ones were John, Thomas, Abraham, Richard and Henry. Others in frequent use were Joseph, Edmond, Francis, Ralph and George.

    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    HINCHLIFFE AND VARIANTS
    THE ORIGIN OF THE NAME
    By Trevor Hinchliffe

    (I should state that I'm no expert, so this is one persons observations)

    The origin of the Hinchliffe name

    The Hinchliffe name originally evolved in the Holme Valley area in West Yorkshire, with the epicenter around Holmfirth, in particular Hinchliffe Mill (Dr George Redmonds <mailto:GRedmonds@aol.com>). Prior to the construction of the Mill in 1832 the name of the area now known as Hinchliffe Mill was known as Hinchliffe or Hinchcliffe. In the 1300's the area was known as various versions Hengeclif to Hynchecliff. However the first manifestation of the name was 'Heyncheclyf' in 1307. The origin of the place name is difficult to determine, It doesn't appear to be English in origin however, because a similar word or place name doesn't occur in the current or Celtic languages.
    Other authors have indicated at the names origins prior to 1066 are most likely from the Normandy area of France and north to southern Belgium originally Flanders.
    They look at the first occurrence of the name in West Yorkshire in 1324 with John de Hengeclif. They say the 'de' (Meaning 'of' in French (During the Norman ocupation)) as strong evidence that the origin of the name is most likely from the time of the Norman invasion in 1066, They were most likely part of the Norman invasion forces. Though 'de Hengeclif' doesn't appear on the Battell Abbey Rolls. Which most likely means Hinchliffe's or de Hengeclif's were either: Standard bearers, Men at Arms, Yeomen, Freemen and other ranks not listed on the Battell Abbey Rolls, which numbers 12000 or so.
    The argument is difficult to prove. Hengeclif has been used as the primary origin of the Name Hinchliffe however this variant only occurs 4-5 time in historical documents relating to 2 or 3 people, from1324 to 1331. Hengeclif was most likely a Norman bureaucrats attempt at translating the name to a French phonetic base. After the fall of the Normans in 1362 this spelling disappears. Incidentally there is no French equivalent.
    Hynchecliff or similar is much more common and continuous through out time, it still exists in a similar form today (e.g. Hinchecliffe). Also as we have stated 'Heyncheclyf' predate Hengeclif by 17 year at least. This fact makes the utilisation of Hengeclif as the origin as tentative at the very least.
    It does appear that the place name 'Heyncheclyf' is an English adaptation from the original name prior to 1307. But the question is where did the name come from. One possibility is the place name predates the Norman invasion of 1066 to the Saxon invasion of 800 AD. This then makes the origin Germanic in linguistic origin. The words Hinschliff, Hin-schleife & hin-schliff occur in the German language. Meaning 'there bow or 'U' bend or of the bow or 'U' bend (Old German) The words Schleife or Schliff is often used to describe a geographic feature such a river that turns back on itself. These words would have become anglicized over time, so by the 1300's manifesting itself as 'Heyncheclyf'

    It does appear that the place name 'Heyncheclyf' is an English adaptation from the original name prior to 1307. But the question is where did the name come from. One possibility is the place name predates the Norman invasion of 1066 to the Saxon invasion of 800 AD. This then makes the origin Germanic in linguistic origin. The words Hinschliff, Hin-schleife & hin-schliff occur in the German language. Meaning 'there bow or 'U' bend or of the bow or 'U' bend (Old German) The words Schleife or Schliff is often used to describe a geographic feature such a river that turns back on itself. These words would have become anglicized over time, so by the 1300's manifesting itself as 'Heyncheclyf'
    The other possible origin of the name 'Heyncheclyf' and ultimately Hinchliffe is that it has a binomial origin. So perhaps the name Hinch, Hench, Hinsch or similar both early Old Germany names with the typical Cliff suffix common in this area of west Yorkshire and Cheshire.
    There is no real way to be sure how the place name or surname Hinchliffe originally evolved, mainly because there were very few documents of that time surviving through to today. Also very few documents were drawn up prior to 1300's, and of course surnames didn't really exist prior to that time. So we can only speculate. However there is little evidence to support the Hinchliffe or Hinchcliffe have a French or Norman origin.
    We can say with some confidence that the Hinchliffe's or Hinchliffe family originally came from Holmfirth in West Yorkshire, in particular 'Hinchliffe Mill' village area, formerly 'Heyncheclyf' or similar. The family later radiated over the greater Holmfirth area. 'Holmfirth' which is the origin of Joseph Hinchliffe in born c.1770 our / my direct Ancestor.
    Spellings of the surname from the 1300's appears very variable de Hyengeclif / de Hengeklif / de Hingecliff / de Hyngecliff / de Hyncheclyff / de Hynchecliff / de Hynchecliff.
    Bear in mine that the Hinchliffe name is with out a doubt Geographic in origin so the prefix de is French for of or from. This was used during the Norman occupation of England from 1066 to the early 1400's or so.
    The Hinchliffe ancestor have remained in the Holme valley area for about 900 years and many still live there to this today. Around the late 1700's many family members started to move out of the Holme valley area, and populate other areas of Northern England and ultimately countries else where in the world.
    Here are some 20 surname variants found today in the west Yorkshire area: Hinchcliffe, Hinchcliff, Hinchecliffe, Inchcliffe, Hinchliffe, Hinchliff, Hinchsliffe, Hinchsliff, Hinsliffe, Hinsliff, Hincliffe, Hincklieff, Hinchley, Inchley, Henchcliffe, Henchcliff, Henchle and many more. Out of these variants "Hinchliffe" is, and has been the most numerous in the Holme valley local area.
    Today the Hinchliffe name can be found through out the globe with good populations in North America, Australia, United Kingdom.

    Hinchliffe appears to have evolved from de Hengeclif c.1324, Henge {from hinge? or hengst (German for stallion or wild horse) or Hänge German meaning cliffs) or Henge (noun a circular or oval area enclosed by a bank and internal ditch, often containing burial chambers, or a circular, oval or horseshoe-shaped construction of large upright stones or wooden posts).
    [Back-formation from Stonehenge, a famous example, in Old English Stanhengist hanging stones (Which is a bastardisation of Hänge German meaning cliffs/step slopes ])
    Henge is a surname that appear to have originated in northern Germany or there about. The name does appear in Germany though How far back is unclear. The word Hänge in Old German is the word for Cliffs, singular Hange or Hang. But Hänge is pronounced Henge in German. The other Meaning of Hänge is to hang so if we add cliff then the Hanging-cliff or Hengeclif
    In German over the last 400 year there are many variations of this name Hang/ Hangen/ Henge/ Heng/ Hengg/ Hengen/ Henche/ Hensch/ Hinch.
    German link to the Hinchliffe's should be no surprise, considering most, if not all people in the UK today originally came from that area. eg. the Angles were a German Nation, then invaded England in 400AD. The Saxons were also a German Nation they invaded England in 800AD. Hence Anglo-Saxon. Both of these Nations invaded the UK and killed and displaced most of the original people (Northumberland's) replacing them. far as I know the Normans were of Viking origin, so from Norway/Sweden/Denmark. The German link is then unclear. However the Vikings regularly invaded Northern Germany, so it may be related to a time when they had conquered a large area of Northern Germany.de Hengeclif is with out a doubt a hybrid name derived from various languages and cultures. This name is today extinct in that form. De is from the french Of, Henge is from the German Cliffs or step grade,Clif from Cliff a steeply graded slope of the cliff, origin most likely English in origin (There is no French or German word similar).
    de Hengeclif - So perhaps "Of Hanging cliff" or Cliff-Cliff

    HINCHLIFFE= dweller at Henge's cliffe a place near Holmsfirth, West Yorkshire. (old norse name Henge)
    Reference for this <http://freepages.family.rootsweb.com/~creacall/creacallindex.htm>

    Stonehenge - Stanenges (c.1130), "stone gallows," from fancied resemblance, the second element perhaps also from notion of "supported in the air," cf. henge-clif, for L. præruptum.
    Reference for this interpretation <http://www.etymonline.com/>

    Old German words
    Hinschliff = there bow (Old German)
    Hin-schleife = there bow or 'U' bend (Old German) The word Schleife is often used to describe a geographic feature such a river that turns back on itself.
    hin-schliff = there ground (Old German)
    HIN probably derived from 'hinc' adj from the Latin 'from this place'

    Surname Frequency Analysis of the 1841 Census (Huddersfield & District (including Holmfirth)) Hinchliffe like entries
    Hinchcliff(52) Hinchcliffe(107) Hinchlif(1) Hinchliff(569) Hinchliffe(679) Hintchcliff(5) Hintchcliffe(2)

    Surname Frequency Analysis of the 1851 Census (Huddersfield & District (including Holmfirth)) Hinchliffe like entries
    HINCHCLIFF(7), HINCHCLIFFE(261), HINCHLIFF(241), HINCHLIFFE(1004), HINCLIFFE(7)
    Note: Seems to be a considerable population dynamic or perhaps its related to spelling errors in the first Census. The of total population growth regardless of name is 105 which is believable in a ten year period.

    Hengeclif has been used 'Heyncheclyf' predate Hengeclif by 17 year. This fact make the utilisation of Hengeclif as the origin as tentative at the very least.
    The word Hinschliff or Hinschleife does occur in Old & Modern German, the meaning being 'there bow or 'U' bend' or 'from the Bow or 'U' bend'. Which may refer to an extinct geographical feature or an extant feature in that region, of which there is scope for many.

    First surname recorded In 1324 Thomas, son of John de Hengeclif. but the name in the 1300's is very variable; place name: 'Heyncheclyf' surname: de Hyengeclif / de Hengeklif / de Hingecliff / de Hyngecliff / de Hyncheclyff / de Hynchecliff / de Hynchecliff. The name clearly didn't translated to English or French well. This supports the German or maybe Norse origin of the place name at least.
    Hinchliffe appears to have evolved from de Hengeclif or similar prior to c.1324, de (from the French meaning 'of' [bear in mind that England was ruled by the French at this time]) Henge {from hinge? or hengst? (German for stallion or wild horse) or more likely Hänge German meaning cliffs/step slope) or Henge (noun a circular or oval area enclosed by a bank and internal ditch, often containing burial chambers, or a circular, oval or horseshoe-shaped construction of large upright stones or wooden posts).
    [Back-formation from Stonehenge, a famous example, in Old English Stanhengist hanging stones (Which is a bastardisation of Hänge (Pronounced 'Henge')[old German and Norse meaning cliffs/step slopes ])
    The variation with in the name Hinchliffe today in West Yorkshire also supports the English origin idea.
    Here are some variants found today in the west Yorkshire area: Hinchcliffe, Hinchcliff, Hinchecliffe, Inchcliffe, Hinchliffe, Hinchliff, Hinchsliffe, Hinchsliff, Hinsliffe, Hinsliff, Hincliffe, Hincklieff, Hinchley, Inchley, Henchcliffe, Henchcliff, Henchle and many more. Out of these variants "Hinchliffe" is, and has been the most numerous in the Holme valley local area.
    Another point is the 3 fleurs-de-lis in the Hinchliffe coat of arms as proof of the link to France, however this is not true. King Henry IV of England followed Charles V with the change to three lilies. the three fleurs-de-lis in the coat of arms is most likely entirely English in origin as Edward III, had used the 3 fleurs-de-lis to symbolised the English claim to France by placing the French lilies in his first quarter of his coat of arms.). Bear in mind that northern England was occupied by France (well via the Norman's) until the 1400's so the awarding of use of the 3 fleurs-de-lis in arms at the time after 1376 would be quite normal in England as far as I can tell.

    Look at 'Henge' surnames else where
    Henge is a surname that appear to have originated in northern Germany/ Denmark? or there about. The name does appears in Germany though how far back is unclear. The word Hänge in Old German is the word for Cliffs, singular Hange or Hang. But Hänge is pronounced Henge in German. The other Meaning of Hänge is to hang so if we add cliff then the Hanging-cliff or Hengeclif
    Countries in Northern Europe that have place names with Henge/Hange/Hinch/Hinsch
    Germany
    HENGERSBACH, BAYERN, SCHWANDORF, DE
    HENGEN, BADEN-WÜRTTEMBERG, REUTLINGEN, DE
    HENGEMÜHLE, NIEDERSACHSEN, DIEPHOLZ, DE
    HENGELBACH, THÜRINGEN, SAALFELD-RUDOLSTADT, DE
    HENGELAU, BADEN-WÜRTTEMBERG, KONSTANZ, DE
    HENGELAGE, NIEDERSACHSEN, OSNABRÜCK LK, DE
    HANGENDOBL, BAYERN, ROSENHEIM LK, DE
    HANGENDENBUCH, BADEN-WÜRTTEMBERG, OSTALBKREIS, DE
    HANGEN-WEISHEIM, RHEINLAND-PFALZ, ALZEY-WORMS, DE
    HANGENDEINBACH, BADEN-WÜRTTEMBERG, OSTALBKREIS, DE
    HANGEN, BADEN-WÜRTTEMBERG, RAVENSBURG, DE
    HANGELSBERG, BRANDENBURG, ODER-SPREE, DE
    HINSCHENFELDE,_HAMBURG_DE

    France

    HENGOAT, BRETAGNE, CÔTES-D'ARMOR, FR
    HENGWILLER, ALSACE, BAS-RHIN, FR
    HANGEST-SUR-SOMME, PICARDIE, SOMME, FR
    HANGEST-EN-SANTERRE, PICARDIE, SOMME, FR <
    HANGENBIETEN, ALSACE, BAS-RHIN, FR

    Netherlands

    HENGEVELDE, OVERIJSSEL, HOF VAN TWENTE, NL
    HENGELO, GELDERLAND, HENGELO, NL
    HENGELO, OVERIJSSEL, HENGELO, NLHENGELO, OVERIJSSEL, HENGELO, NL

    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Possible birth entry:
    IGI Individual Record FamilySearchÙL International Genealogical Index v5.0
    British Isles
    Search Results | Download

    JOSEPH HINCHCLIFFE Pedigree
    Male

    Event(s):
    Birth:
    Christening: 04 OCT 1767 Cumberworth, Yorkshire, England

    Death:
    Burial:

    Parents:
    Father: BENJAMIN HINCHCLIFFE Family

    Messages:
    Extracted birth or christening record for locality listed in the record. The source records are usually arranged chronologically by the birth or christening date.

    Source Information:
    Batch No.: Dates: Source Call No.: Type: Printout Call No.: Type:
    J107872 1731 - 1789 0919369 Film 6911041 Film

    J107872 1808 - 1812 0919369 Film 6911041 Film


    Further to the entry above:

    Individual Record FamilySearchÙL Pedigree Resource File

    Search Results

    Joseph Hinchcliffe Compact Disc #28 Pin #397499 Pedigree
    Sex: M

    Event(s)
    Birth: 4 Oct 1767

    cumberworth, Yorkshire, England

    Parents
    Father: Benjamin Hinchliffe Disc #28 Pin #397452
    Mother: Elizabeth Kershaw Disc #28 Pin #397453

    Notes and Sources
    Notes: None
    Sources: None

    Submitter
    Duncan WARD
    70,Branch Street,Paddock, Huddersfield,

    Submission Search: 1275944-0417101154312
    URL:
    CD-ROM: Pedigree Resource File - Compact Disc #28
    CD-ROM Features: Pedigree View, Family View, Individual View, Reports, Downloadable GEDCOM files, Notes and Sources.
    Order Pedigree Resource File CD-ROMS
    3
  • Note:
    (Medical):His death came by accident through being thrown from the top of loaded wagon - as best I can remember".

    THE HINCHLIFFE FAMILY
    RELATIONS OF JOSEPH HINCHLIFFE OF ELKLON, MARYLAND, U.S.A.
    By Joseph Hinchliffe Perkins. August 30th, 1949.




    Marriage 1 Mary Mitchell b: 1771 in West Riding, Yorkshire, England, UK.
    • Married: 6 Jun 1803 in All Hallow, Kirkburton, West Riding, Yorkshire, England, UK. 1 4
    • Change Date: 2 Oct 2013
    Children
    1. Has Children Nanny Hinchliffe b: Abt 1803 in Honley, West Riding, Yorkshire, England, UK.
    2. Has Children Jonas Hinchliffe b: Abt 1804 in Yorkshire, England, UK.
    3. Has Children George Hinchliffe b: 12 Aug 1805 in Yorkshire, England, UK. c: 13 Sep 1805 in All Hallows, Kirkburton, Yorkshire, England, UK.
    4. Has No Children (Child) Hinchliffe b: Abt 1806
    5. Has Children Joseph Hinchliffe b: 12 Apr 1808 in Honley, West Riding, Yorkshire, England, UK
    6. Has Children James Hinchliffe b: Abt 1809 in Honley or Holmefirth, West Riding, Yorkshire, England, UK. c: 16 Dec 1809 in Wesleyan, Netherthong, West Riding, Yorkshire, England, UK.
    7. Has Children William Hinchliffe b: Abt 1811 in Honley or Holmefirth, West Riding, Yorkshire, England, UK. c: 28 Apr 1811 in Wesleyan, Netherthong, Yorkshire, England, UK.
    8. Has Children Charles Hinchliffe b: Abt 1813 in Honley or Holmefirth, West Riding, Yorkshire, England, UK. c: 23 May 1813 in Wesleyan, Netherthong, Yorkshire, England, UK.
    9. Has Children Hugh Hinchliffe b: Abt 1816 in Honley or Holmefirth, West Riding, Yorkshire, England, UK. c: 6 Apr 1817 in Wesleyan, Netherthong, Yorkshire, England, UK.
    10. Has Children Joshua Hinchliffe b: Abt 1819 in Yorkshire, England, UK.

    Sources:
    1. Abbrev: International Genealogical Index (R) (FamilySearch)
      Title: International Genealogical Index / International Genealogical IndexFamilySearch / International Genealogical Index (R) (FamilySearch)
      Author: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saint
      Publication: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, International Genealogical Index (R), Copyright (c) 1980, 2002, data as of April 10, 2005
    2. Abbrev: THE HINCHLIFFE FAMILY
      Title: THE HINCHLIFFE FAMILY
      RELATIONS OF JOSEPH HINCHLIFFE OF ELKLON, MARYLAND, U.S.A
      By Joseph Hinchliffe Perkins. August 30th, 1949.
      Author: By Joseph Hinchliffe Perkins. August 30th, 1949
      Date: August 30th, 1949
    3. Abbrev: FamilySearchÙL Pedigree Resource File
      Title: FamilySearchÙL Pedigree Resource File
      Author: Marion Edith MCRAE
      Publication: Marion Edith MCRAE
      279 Lieutenant Bowen Drive Bowen Mountain N.S.W.
      Compact Disc #112 Pin #283908
    4. Abbrev: All West Yorkshire, England, Baptisms, Marriages and Burials, 1512-1812
      Title: All West Yorkshire, England, Baptisms, Marriages and Burials, 1512-1812
      Author: www.Ancestry.com
      Publication: All West Yorkshire, England, Baptisms, Marriages and Burials, 1512-1812
      This data collection contains images of Church of England baptism, marriage, and burial records in registers from parishes in the West Yorkshire area of England for the years 1512–1812.
      Date: 1512–1812

  • Index | Descendancy | Register | Download GEDCOM | Public Profile | Add Post-em

    Complied 6 Nov. 2013

    Printer Friendly Version Printer Friendly Version Search Ancestry Search Ancestry Search WorldConnect Search WorldConnect Join Ancestry.com Today! Join Ancestry.com Today!

    WorldConnect Home | WorldConnect Global Search | WorldConnect Help

    RootsWeb.com, Inc. is NOT responsible for the content of the GEDCOMs uploaded through the WorldConnect Program. If you have a problem with a particular entry, please contact the submitter of said entry. You have full control over your GEDCOM. You can change or remove it at any time.