Descendants of Johannes Amick & Dorothea Rotter

Entries: 1377    Updated: 2006-04-13 16:07:02 UTC (Thu)    Contact: Rowan Fairgrove    Home Page: Rowan's Genealogy Pages

Descendants of Johannes Amick & Dorothea Rotter

Index | Descendancy | Register | Public Profile | Add Post-em

  • ID: I56
  • Name: Johannes Amick
  • Sex: M 1
  • Birth: ABT 1695 in GER
  • Note: Parish of Gunderhoffen
  • Death: AFT 1762 in Manheim Twp., York Co., PA 2
  • Occupation: Nailsmith (Journeyman at time of emigration)
  • Religion: Lutheran
  • Note: 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 7 10 11 12

    The immigrant ancestor was Johannes b abt 1682 (Taylor info) or abt 1688 (Dunn info) or 1695 (Gross info).

    They came from Rotterdam to Philadelphia in 1732 on the Pink John and William.

    Information on this family comes from "The Amick Family" by Barbara J. Nicols, 8502 Tuckaway SW, Tacoma, WA 98499 (undated). This work includes sons Henry and George but not daughter Anna Maria. She is included in the family records of Barbara Hill Amick, 927 Riverside Drive, International Falls, MN 56649 (pre-1986). Those records also state that Anna was born in the Rhineland, but she was not listed in the ship's records. [From Linda Taylor]

    death info [From Hal Amick]

    Fourteen families from Northern Bas-Rhine went to Pennsylvania together in 1732 aboard the ship Pink John & William. Johannes Emich knew many of these families as they came from neighboring villages. A few are associated with him in Pennsylvania records.

    Johannes was the only one from Uttenhoffen, Niederbronn-less-Baines. Seven families resided at Lemback, Soultz, north and east of Uttenhoffen: Balser Gerlach and wife Maria; Ludwig Hugel; Christian Low, Conrad Low and wife; Anna Gluf Lowein, Philip Lowein, Christian Lowein, Barbara Lowein and Margaret Lowein; Johannes Nagel; Hans Georg Sprecher and wife Catharina Spreakering, Jacob Weber and wife Dorothy

    Johannes was the only one from Uttenhoffen, Niederbronn-less-Baines. (Bever). Two from Langensoultzbach, Woerth: Hans Michael Hoffman & wife Eva Hausman (name listed in error). One family from Windstein, Niederbronn-les-Bains and Langensoultzbach: Lorentz Roser (Laurence Rosier, sick, and Dorothy Rosar). Lastly one from Oberseebach, Wissembourg: Jacob Philip Probst and wife Cathrina Proops, Michael Proops, and Felder Proops. these families are all listed in Annette Kunsellman Burgert's "Eighteenth Century Emigrants from the Northern Alsace to America".


    Came to America aboard the "John and William" from the Palatinate area  on October 17, 1732. THE EMIG FAMILY IN AMERICA 1732-1970 Pg. 2

    FGR from Jerry Mower lists marriage 26 Jan 1723, Speyer, Rhine, Germany

    FGS of Barbara Hill Amick (no sources cited): Johannes (Hans) Emig, b c 1688, Holy Roman Empire - Now W Germany, entered Philadelphia 17 Oct 1732 on Ship PINK (sic) John and William; Places of residence - Rhineland - Palatinate, Germany; m Eva Dorothea

    Johannes (Hans) (John) Emig (Amick), b ca. 1688, Holy Roman Empire (Germany);
    FGS in book on MO Amicks by Wiley Amick, quotes information from Hollis Brower
    Hans and family entered Philadelphia on 17 October 1732. They arrived on the good ship John and William. Johannes, Nicholas and Anna Maria Coble all moved to Guilford County, NC. Nicholas then moved to Randolph County, NC. Eve Margarethea Rausch could have been the dau of Peter Raush and Anna Margaret Zimmerman.
    There is some question as to Dorthea. She may have been a daughter of Hans.
    Hans was 44 years old when he came to America.

    From Phillip Junkins:

    1 Johannes (Hans) Emich
    -----------------------------------
    Birth: ca. 1688/1690, Uttenhoffen, Gundershoffen, Bas Rhin, France
    Death: ca.1762, Manhiem Township, York County, Pennsylvania

    He came via Rotterdan and Dover to the U.S., and passed thru the Port of Philadelphia on 17 Oct 1732 from ship Pink John and William. Johannes, Dorothy, Nicholas and Jacob are listed on the pasenger list. They spent time in Pennsylvania, then moved to North Carolina between 1750 and 1760.

    Spouse: Anna Dorothea Rotter
    Birth: 27 Feb 1692, Uttenhoffen, Gundershoffen, Bas Rhine, France
    Death: ca. 1759
    Marr: 21 Nov 1717, Uttenhoffer, Gundershoffen, Bas Rhine France

    Children: Johan Georg (1718-1721)
    Nicolaus (1719-1798)
    Johan Georg (1721-1722)
    Johannes (1722-1786)
    Anna Maria (Barbara Maria) (1723-)
    Johan Daniel (1727-1731)
    Johan Dieboldt "Dewalt" (1728-)
    Magdalena (1731-1732)
    Mathias (1737-1791)
    Oath of Allegiance 1727-1775

    All males over sixteen years of age were obliged to take this oath and declaration as soon after their arrival as possible, often being marched to the Court House.

    "I do solemnly, sincerely and truly acknowledge, profess, testify and declare that King George the Second is the lawful and rightful King of the Realm of Great Brittain and all others his Dominions and Countries. - - - and do declare that I do believe the Person pretending to be Prince of Wales during the Life of late King James --- hath not any right or title whatsoever to the Crown of the Realm of Great Britain - - I will of my best endeavors and make known to King George the Second and his successors all treasons and traitorous conspiracies which I shall know to be made against him or any of the - - -.

    And I do make this Recognition, Acknowledgment, Renunciation and Promise heartily, willingly and trule (sic)."

    Qualified Oct. 17, 1732 - - - Hans Emich, foreigner imported in the Ship Pink John & William of Sunderland, Constable Tymperton, Master, from Rotterdam.

    John Emich of York County, PA, took up 100 acres of land in Manheim Township adjoining lands of Samuel Dechtel, Christian Gher and Conrad Loaw. The original warrant was dated 10 May 1752. It indicates the close relationships between former neighbors years later in York Co, PA.

    See Emerick Family Newsletter No. 47, page 3, Fall 1995. John (Johannes) received two land Warrents, the first was in 1746 in Manchester Twp, Pennsylvania, the second in Manheim Twp, Pennsylvania. In 1749 John Emich, Nailsmith, sold the Manchester Twp land to his son John Emig, Yeoman, or farmer.
    Wiley Amick's package contains an unsigned letter dated July 31, 1985, that begin

    "Dear EMIGH family,". The letter tells us that the writer and his wife,  Eleanor, "visited Dannenfels, Germany--the boyhood home of Johann Nicolaus Emick (ca 1689-1761) our American Progenitor. Johann came to America in 1710 when he was about 21 years old, and as you know, he settled in the Hudson River valley of New York state.

        "We had planned this visit to Dannenfels ever since the home location of our EMIGH family had been verified by the genealogist Henry Jones during research for his book "The Palatine Families of New York," (published earlier this year). We were armed with the knowledge that German records would show that our family name was spelled EMICH prior to Napoleon and EMIG generally thereafter. And from our own research, we knew that several later EMICH/EMIG families had left Dannenfels for America. These post-1710 family members settled in PA rather than New York, and one of their descendants founded the town of Emigsville near York, Pa."

    The writer describes a drive from Worms "(the city from where the Pope gave Martin Luther his walking papers in 1521). From there we drove on a country road through a number of small villages--Monsheim, Albisheim, Marnheim, Dreisen." ... "Dannenfels itself is perched on the side of Thunder Mountain (Donnersberg) and is surrounded close in by small orchards: apples, cherries, apricots and peaches."

        The writer describes a meeting with Anna EMIG Siebecker, apparently the last member of the EMIG family in Dannenfels (or thereabouts). However, between 1735 and 1831 it was the most populous family name in Dannenfels. The first Burgermeister, in 1734, was a Johann Valentin Emig. Dannenfels suffered destruction in the Thirty Years War as well as the several wars of the 1700s (probably Queen Anne's War as well as the War of Spanish Succession--as they are known in America).

    "Ernst Gumbel has been Burgermeister since 1969 and he was instrumental in producing the book "Dannenfels" in 1981 for the 650th anniversary of the village charter of 1331. Dannenfels, he pointed out, is actually much older if classified as a village ('Dorf') rather than a city ('Stadt'). Herr Gumbel went through his book page by page and spotted several early day EMICH references in the historical section. The first EMICH family name appeared around 1607. Another EMICH reference shows some family present at the time of the Thirty Years War (1618-1648). All later references in the book seem to use the Hessia spelling (EMIG) rather than the Frankonia spelling (EMICH). Quite possibly this merely reflects a change in origin of the recordkeepers rather than a family change. Few tradespeople of those early times could write.

        "It is interesting to note at this point that our present day EMIGH spelling--in our lineage at least--was established in America Long after Johann Nicolaus Emich's 1710 arrival in New York. A number of phoenetic variations of the name existed among Johanns children, grandchildren and even later descendants. For example, my great great grandfather--Philip (1779-1852) was buried under a gravemarker which shows his family name as EIGHMIE--and Philip died just before the Civil War! Now, if you are really interested in tracing the family name way back in European history--a way, way back--you will find that both EMICH and EMIG surnames are actually short forms of EMMERICH of Gothic origin thought to originate in the tales of ERMENRICH saga at BREISACH castle. Start with Hans Bahlow's "Deutches Namenlexikon" published in 1981."

        !Johannes Emich by Barbara K. Nichols.

        !Uttenhoffen, Gundershoffen Parish, Bas-Rhine, France
        Johannes Emich married Anna Dorothea Rotter 21 Nov 1717 in Uttenhoffen.
        He is listed as "of" Uttenhoffen, Occupation Nailsmith.

        !Uttenhoffen is in the parish of Gundershoffen, Bas Rhine, France, where this event is recorded. The area is north and a little west of Strasbourg and south of the Paletanate region of Germany.

        !Anna Dorothea Rotter was born 27 Feb 1692 in Uttenhoffen, a legal daughter of Hans Georg Rotter, a citizen of Uttenhoffen, father's name unknown,, and Anna Marie Volckel, legitimate daughter of Dorst Volckel, citizen of Uttenhoffen.

        !Gundershoffen Lutheran records began in 1682. The births of Hans Georg Rotter and Anna Maria Volckel could not be studied.

        !The search for Emicks before 1717, in or near Gundershoffen parish, revealed no christening for Johannes. This indicates the Emichs came from another locality. After the defeat of Louis XIV in 1697, many reformed Swiss families came into the area of Gundershoffen to repopulate it. At the time of the emigration this region was German territory. Gundershoffen was under the Counts of Hanau-Lichernberg.

        !Canton Bern in Switzerland provided the majority of Swiss into the Alsatian territories. Of 441, approximately 400 came from Bern, 14 from Canton Zurich, and a few from other cantons.

        !Bas-Rhine Families to America in 1732 Aboard Pink John & William

        !Fourteen families from Northern Bas-Rhine went to PA together in 1732 aboard the ship Pink John & William. Johannes Emich knew many of these families as they came from neighboring villages. A few are associated with him in PA records.

        !Johannes was the only one from Uttenhoffen, Niederbronn-less-Baines. Seven families resided at Lemback, Soultz, north and east of Uttenhoffen: Balser Gerlach and wife Maria; Ludwig Hugel; Christian Low, Conrad Low and wife; Anna Gluf Lowein, Philip Lowein, Christian Lowein, Barbara Lowein and Margaret Lowein; Johannes Nagel; Hans Georg Sprecher and wife Catharina Spreakering, Jacob Weber and wife Dorothy

        !Johannes was the only one from Uttenhoffen, Niederbronn-less-Baines. (Bever). Two from Langensoultzbach, Woerth: Hans Michael Hoffman & wife Eva Hausman (name listed in error). One family from Windstein, Niederbronn-les-Bains and Langensoultzbach: Lorentz Roser (Laurence Rosier, sick, and Dorothy Rosar). Lastly one from Oberseebach, Wissembourg: Jacob Philip Probst and wife Cathrina Proops, Michael Proops, and Felder Proops. these families are all listed in Annette Kunsellman Burgert's "Eighteenth Century Emigrants from the Northern Alsace to America".

        !John Emich of York County, PA, took up 100 acres of land in Manheim Township adjoining lands of Samuel Dechtel, Christian Gher and Conrad Loaw. The original warrant was dated 10 May 1752. It indicates the close relationships between former neighbors years later in York Co, PA.

        !The Ship 'Pink John and William'

        !The ships had a regular period to arrive in America. The emigrants left their German homes in the spring of the year, passed down the Rhine, and were ready to sail in May or June. The ocean voyage, therefore, was usually completed in the last month of summer or early in the autumn.

        !Most of the ships are recorded as arriving in Philadelphia in August, September and October. The recording of ships' lists started in September, 1727.

        !Johannes Emich (listed as Hans), wife Dorothea (listed as Dorothy), sons Nicholas, John and Diebold (listed as Jacob) and two daughters (unlisted) left about June 16, 1732, in the Pink John & William. The Journey took an unprecedented 17 weeks to Philadelphia, arriving Oct. 19, 1732. The hardships endured are but briefly mentioned in the newspaper account of the ship's arrival in Philadelphia.

        !What is very unusual about the journey was the taking over of the ship by the passengers dissatisfied with the conditions, deaths by starvation and the length of the voyage. As a result of these conditions, 44 passengers died including the youngest daughter of Johannes and Dorothea, one-year -old Magdalena.

        !The PA Gazette, Oct. 9-19, 1732 No. 203 Custom House, Philadelphia Entered Inwards Sloop John & William Constable Tymperton, From Dover. Philadelphia, Oct 19, 1732

        !"Sunday last arrived here Capt. Tymberton, in 17 weeks from Rotterdam, with 220 Palatines, 44 died in the Passage. About three weeks ago, the Passengers, dissatisfied with the length of the voyage, were so imprudent as to make a Mutiny, and being the stronger Party have ever since had the Government of the Vessel, giving Orders from among themselves to the Captain and Sailors, who were threatened with Death in case of Disobedience. Thus having Sight of Land, they carried the Vessel twice backwards and forwards between our Capes and Virginia, looking for a place to go ashore they knew not where. At length they compelled the Sailors to cast Anchor near Cape May, and five of them took the Boat by force and went ashore from whence they have been five Days coming up by Land to this place, where they found the Ship arrived. Those concerned in taking the Boat are committed to Prison."

        !One of my Amick (Emich) family traditions states "Three brothers came to PA from Germany, a sister started with them but she died and was buried at sea." This seems to be borne out in the passenger list of the John & William in Prof. Daniel Rupp's "Thirty Thousand Names of Immigrants to PA" and in the "PA Gazette" report of Oct. 19, 1732.

        !Rupp states that the passengers numbered "170 in all." The Gazette reported "220 passengers, 44 died in passage, leaving 176 on arrival." Rupp's list appears to be of those landing in PA with no mention of the passengers who died. There is a discrepancy of six passengers between the two sources.

    The source is EIGHTEENTH CENTURY EMIGRANTS - THE NORTHERN ALSACE
    by Annette K. Burgert Picton Press pages 142 143

    Johannes Emig from Uttenhoffen (today's Niederbronn-les-Bains) arrived in Philadelphia on the ship John and William in 1732. (Source: Strassburger-Hinke pages 102, 104, 105) With Johannes are Dorothy Emich, Nicholas, Johannes and Jacob.

    GUNDERSHOFFEN LUTHERAN CHURCH RECORDS (Evangelisch Kirche Gundershoffen)
    Johannes Emich a nailsmith journeyman married 21 Nov 1717 at Uttenhoffen Anna Dorothea daughter of Hans Georg Rotter, citizen at Uttenhoffen.
    Children:
    Johan Georg b 18 Jun 1718 bp 20 Jun 1718
    Nicholas b 24 May 1719 bp 29 May 1719
    Joh. Georg b 7 Mar 1721 bp 9 Mar 1721
    Johannes b 14 Mar 1722 bp 15 Mar 1722
    Anna Maria b 6 Jul 1723 bp 8 Jul 1723
    Joh. Daniel b 6 Feb 1727 bp 9 Feb 1727
    Magdalena b 28 Sept 1731 bp 30 Sept 1731

    Dorothea's parents married 28 Nov 1690 at Uttenhoffen: Hans Georg Rotter, single son of the late ____Rotter, former citizen at Gumprechtshoffen (todays' Niederbronn-les-Bains) and Anna Maria, daughter of Dorst Volckel, citizen at Uttenhoffen.

    American Records:
    Trinity Lutheran Church Lancaster PA
    Johann Emich and wife Dorothea were sponsors in 1738 for a child of Georg Adam Stiess.

    1738, Johannes Moll had a daughter Anna Maria b 13 Dec 1738 bp 25 Dec 1738. One of the sponsors at her baptism was Anna Maria Emich, "but on account of her minority, her mother Dorothea Emich stood in her place."

    First Reformed Church Records Lancaster:

    Nicholas Emig and wife Eva Margaret had Eva Barbara b 17 Jul 1740 bp 19 Jul 1740. Nicholas Emig and wife Eva Marie, nee Rausch were the sponsors

    John Ehmig and wife had Matthias b 28 Feb 1737 bp 17 Apr 1737
    John Emig son of John Emig m 15 Dec 1745 Maria Margaret Crentz daughter of Valentin Crentz.

    Anthony Kobel and wife Anna Maria nee Emig had a son John born 15 Jul 1742 bp 4 Oct 1742. Sponsor John Emig

    Pennsylvania Foreign Oaths of Allegiance
    IMMIGRANTS INTO PENNSYLVANIA: Volume 1
    Name: Hans Emich,
    Name: Hans Emich,
    Name: Nicholus Emich,
    Name: Jacob Emich,
    Name: Dorothy Emich,
    Name: Johannes Emich,
    Ship: PINK
    Place: ROTTERDAM
    Date: OCT. 17, 1732
  • Text: p. 2
  • Text: No. 47, p. 3, Fall 1995
  • Immigration: Y
  • Change Date: 17 OCT 2001



    Marriage 1 Eva Dorothea Rotter b: 27 FEB 1692 in Uttenhoffen, Alsace-Lorraine
    • Married: 21 NOV 1717 in Uttenhoffen, Alsace-Lorraine 13
    Children
    1. Has No Children Johan George Amick b: 18 JUN 1718 in Uttenhoffen, Alsace-Lorraine
    2. Has Children Nicholas Amick b: 24 MAY 1719 in Uttenhoffen, Alsace-Lorraine
    3. Has No Children John Georg Amick b: 7 MAR 1721 in Uttenhoffen, Alsace-Lorraine
    4. Has Children Johannes Amick b: 14 MAR 1722 in Alsace-Lorraine
    5. Has Children Anna Maria Amick b: 6 JUL 1723 in Alsace-Lorraine
    6. Has No Children Johan Daniel Amick b: 6 FEB 1727 in Alsace-Lorraine
    7. Has No Children Jacob Amick b: 25 OCT 1728 in Alsace-Lorraine
    8. Has No Children Magdalena Amick b: 28 SEP 1731 in Uttenhoffen, Alsace-Lorraine
    9. Has No Children Maria Eleanora Amick b: ABT 1733
    10. Has No Children George Valentine Amick b: ABT 1734 in PA
    11. Has Children Mathias Amick b: ABT 28 FEB 1736 in York Co., PA

    Sources:
    1. Title: AMICK surname file in Randolph Public Library, Asheboro, NC,
      Author: Janis J. Dunn, 2015 3rd St. So., Nampa, Idaho 83651
      Publication: 20 AUG 1994
      Text: She has done quite a bit of research on the AMICK family. She cites
      cemetery records, personal letters, family Bibles, and ship records
      as her sources.
      Text: marriage date & children
    2. Type: Gedcom File
      Title: Hal Amick's data
    3. Type: E-Mail Message
      Author: Linda Taylor
      Title: email messages on her research
      Date: August 1987
      Location: Linda Taylor, 103 Williams Dr., Versailles, MO 65084
    4. Type: Book
      Author: Annette Kunsellman Burgert
      Periodical: Eighteenth Century Emigrants from the Northern Alsace to America
      Text: quoted in info from Hall Amick
    5. Type: Book
      Periodical: Emig Family in America 1732-1970
    6. Type: Gedcom File
      Title: Barbara H. Amick, 927 Riverside Dr., International Falls, MN 56649
    7. Type: Gedcom File
      Title: book on MO Amicks provided by Wiley Amick, compiled byNancy Scott
      Author: Nancy Scott
    8. Type: Gedcom File
      Title: Amick-Junkins
      Date: 11/2/98
      Text: 4869 E Springersville Rd
      Brownsville, IN 47325-9218
      1-765-825-3920
    9. Type: Periodical
      Title: Emerick Family Newsletter
    10. Type: Newspaper
      Title: No. 203 Custom House, Philadelphia Entered Inwards Sloop John & William Constable Tymperton, From Dover. Philadelphia, Oct 19, 1732
      Periodical: Pennsylvania Gazette
      Date: Oct. 9-19, 1732
    11. Type: Book
      Author: Barbara J. Nichols
      Periodical: John Amick "The Miller", His Ancestors and Some Descendants
      Publication: self-published, undated, 104pp
    12. Type: Book
      Author: Egle, William Henry
      Periodical: Names Of Foreigners Who Took The Oath Of Allegiance To The Province And State Of Pennsylvania, 1727-1775, With The Foreign Arrivals, 1786-1808
      Publication: Harrisburg, PA : E. K. Meyers, 1892
      Media: ancestry.com
    13. Type: Vital Record
      Title: Marriages 1682-1755
      Place: Parish Rec. Evangelische Kirke, Gundershoffen
      Location: Bas-Rhine, France

  • Index | Descendancy | Register | Public Profile | Add Post-em

    This information is accurate to the best of my knowledge. I would love to hear about additions or corrections.

    Printer Friendly Version Printer Friendly Version Search Ancestry Search Ancestry Search WorldConnect Search WorldConnect Join Ancestry.com Today! Join Ancestry.com Today!

    WorldConnect Home | WorldConnect Global Search | WorldConnect Help

    RootsWeb.com, Inc. is NOT responsible for the content of the GEDCOMs uploaded through the WorldConnect Program. If you have a problem with a particular entry, please contact the submitter of said entry. You have full control over your GEDCOM. You can change or remove it at any time.