Rhode Family Tree

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  • ID: I3154
  • Name: William Clarke 1
  • Sex: M
  • Birth: 11 Feb 1608/09 in Plymouth, Devon, England 2
  • Death: 19 Jul 1690 in Northampton, Hampshire, Massachusetts 3
  • Note:
    Father: Thomas Clarke b. 1 Nov 1570 in Westhorpe, Suffolk, England d. 29 Jul 1627 in Westhorpe, Suffolk, England
    Mother: Rose Kerrige b. 13 Apr 1572 in Saxtead, Suffolk, England d. 19 Sep 1627 in Westhorpe, Suffolk, England [source: a public member tree on Ancestry.com].

    Extract from Family Data Collection - Births:
    Name: William Clarke
    Father: Thomas Clarke
    Mother: Rose Keridge Kerrich
    Birth date: 11 Feb 1610
    County: Suffolk
    Country: England

    Extract from Passenger and Immigration Lists Index, 1500s-1900s:
    Name: William Clark
    Year: 1630
    Ship: "Mary and John"
    Place: Nantasket, Massachusetts

    Extract from "Clarke of Northhampton" by Dave Clark, 505 Church Street, Belmont NC 28012; email: dc567810@hotmail.com:
    William Clarke Lt. was born in Dorsetshire, England 1609. William died 19 Jul 1690 Northampton, Hampshire, Massachusetts, at 81 years of age. His body was interred Jul 1690 Bridge Street Cemetery, Northampton, Massachusetts.
    He married twice. He married Sarah ? in Dorchester, Suffolk, Massachusetts, about 1635/36. Sarah was born in England about 1611/13. Sarah died 6 Sep 1675 Northampton, Hampshire, Massachusetts, at 63 years of age. Her body was interred Sep 1675 Bridge Street Cemetery, Northampton, Massachusetts. Little is known about Sarah, not even her surname, or exact date and place of birth. Since her husband, William Clarke, is first noted in the town of Dorchester in 1635, and apparently arrived there from England unmarried, virtually every unmarried Sarah in Dorchester at that time, has been suggested. I have seen Strong, Holton, Bolton, Lambert, Lumbert, Smith and too many more to mention. What I haven't seen is any positive proof for any of these. At present, all that is known of Sarah, is that she and William were admitted as Church members in Dorchester in 1636, resigned from that church to be admitted to the new church in Northampton, in 1666, that all of her children were born in Dorchester, and that she was a good and loving wife to William.
    He married Sarah (Cooper) Russell in Northampton, Hampshire, Massachusetts, 15 Nov 1676. Sarah was born in England about 1620. Sarah was the daughter of John Russell. Sarah died 8 May 1688 Northampton, Hampshire, Massachusetts, at 67 years of age. Her body was interred May 1688 Bridge St. Cemetery, Northampton, Massachusetts. There is some contention about this Sarah's heritage. Different sources say that she was the daughter of either George Slye or John Russell. Either way, this Sarah was the wife of Lt. Thomas Cooper of Springfield. After he was killed there on Oct 5th, 1675 during the Indian raid, Sarah and at least one daughter fled to Northampton. Sarah and Rebecah lived with Lt. Clarke and his family (he was a widower at this time). Lt. Clarke married Sarah on 15 Nov 1676 in Northampton, and his son John married Rebecah on 12 July 1677. The unpublished manuscript of Edith M. Clark Nyman states that Sarah was the sister of William Russell of New Haven, which now leads me to believe that she would have been the daughter of John Russell. There is some evidence that there were two Thomas Cooper's in Springfield at the time of the Indian raid - both married to a Sarah. The one who survived supposedly returned to the eastern part of the state, to Rehobeth, and lived a long life, with many children. His wife was Sarah Slye Cooper, daughter of George Slye. For the present, we have at least three versions on the arrival of William Clarke in the New World:
    Version 1 - he departed Plymouth, England on March 30, 1630 aboard the ship "Mary and John" arriving in Nautucket (now called Hull) on May 30, 1630. He would have been 21 at that time. This is the version that appears in most family records, and the majority of published genealogies including Savage, Trumbull and others. Since there is no existing record of him in Dorchester until 1635, I believe that this version can be discounted.
    Version 2 - William Clarke emigrated in 1630 aboard the ship "William and Mary" in the company of Rev. Mister Warham of Plymouth, Dorsetshire, England. He settled first in Dorchester, Suffolk, Ma. prior to 1635, where he officiated as Townsman or Selectman from 1646 to 1653, removing to Northampton in 1659.
    Version 3 - William Clarke left England on the ship "Mary and John," which sailed from London on March 24, 1633/34, arriving in New England in June of that year.
    This last version seems the most likely, even though it does not agree with "old family tradition." The port of embarkation also differs, although the ship may have made additional stops in other English ports before its final destination. The first fully proven record of him is found in Dorchester Church Records which show that William Clarke and wife, Sarah, were members of that church on 23 Aug 1636. The births of their 10 children were all recorded in Dorchester. (A quick note here: Sarah has never been conclusively identified. "The Parsons Family" by Henry Parsons (1920) identifies her as Sarah Holton. William Holton of Hartford and Northampton came to New England in "The Francis," sailing from Ipswich in 1634. He had a sister, Sarah, who was baptized in Nayland, Suffolk, England, Parish of Holton St. Marys, but nothing more is known about her. Sarah was definitely not the daughter of Elder John Strong, as has been written so often. Elder John did have a niece named Sarah, but as far as is known she never left England.)
    Town records of Dorchester show that William Clarke obtained about 8 acres of land at Squantum Neck from William Hill before 23 Feb 1638, because he sold an acre and a quarter on that date. On 20 Oct 1639 he sold the remaining 7 acres at 20s per acre. He was elected Selectman in Dorchester in 1645, 1647 and 1650. He was a "Rater" (assessor) in 1651, 52, 55 and 57. In 1652-3 he was one of four men appointed to lay out land for Augustine Clement and was elected Fence Viewer in 1653, 56, 58 and 58. In May of 1653, Clarke was one of 24 petitioners to the Massachusetts General Court who desired to inhabit "Nonotuck" (Northampton). All except Clarke were from Connecticut. On 3 Oct 1653, the first meeting of the proprietors of Northampton was held at either Springfield or Hartford, and "William Clark" attended and signed as a proprietor. However, he didn't move there because in 1654, he was chosen as a "Boundsman" to lay out a way to the burial grounds and to determine the bounds between Dorchester and Braintree; In 1655, between Dorchester and Dedham; and in 1658 between Dorchester and Braintree and Dorchester and Roxbury. Also in 1658, he was on a committee to lay out land for Gamaleel Beaman, and in 1659, to lay out meadow lots and to survey land for a school. The committee later appointed John Capen to replace Clarke, who had moved to Northampton.
    The 1633/4 passenger list for the "Mary and John":
    A list and data concerning the passengers of the "Mary and John," a wooden sailing ship that left Southampton, England 24 March 1633/4. This data was made available from the "Mary and John" Clearing House, of Toledo, Ohio. It was printed in about 1986.
    Another list was published in the "Planters of the Commonwealth," by Charles E. Banks-1930.
    There has been some confusion between the passengers of the "Mary and John" of 1630 and those who came in 1633/34 on a ship with the same name. The following list is being listed here to help clear up the situation and to help searchers by listing references on these people.
    The "Mary and John," with Robert Sayers, Master, sailed from Southampton, England, 24 March, 1633/4, but the time was not recorded. Among the passengers:
    #7. William Clarke - Dorchester, Northampton, Massachusetts.
    Reference: "The Waterman Family," by E.F. Waterman. 1639-1954. 3 volumes TAG (The American Genealogist) 12:255. "Descendants of Lt. William Clark of Northampton-1952": Colket Pg 67. Savage 1:404: Pope Pg 104: "American Illustrated," 20:136, 31:203.
    So far, I have learned this much - most early crossings of ships from the west of England to Massachusetts were made under the auspices of the Church - what we now refer to as "Puritans." Considering William's long association with the Rev. Mister Richard Mather (and his son, Rev. Eleazer Mather) both in Dorchester and later in Northampton, it is safe to assume that he too, was a Puritan. Most ships did not maintain passenger lists - the majority of lists that exist today were made up years after the fact to support claims of early settlers that "I was here first," and are totally unreliable.
    By all accounts, William became a prominent citizen, both in Dorchester, and later in Northampton. I have located these references to him:
    In "Genealogical and Family History of the State of Connecticut" - vol II, c. 1911 starting on page 652 - "Lt. William Clarke, immigrant ancestor, was born in Dorsetshire, England in 1609. Family tradition says he came to New England in the ship 'Mary and John,' leaving Plymouth, England on March 30, 1630. The name of Williame Clarke also appears on the list of passengers in the 'Mary and John' which sailed from London March 24th 1633. He settled in Dorchester before 1635, where he became a prominent citizen, selectman, 1646-1653. In 1653 he was one of the petitioners to settle in Northampton, and he removed there in 1659. His wife rode on horseback with two baskets or panniers slung across the horse, carrying a boy in each basket and one on her lap, her husband, fifty years old, preceding on foot. He was granted twelve acres on the West side of what is now Elm Street, bordering on Mill river, and comprising today the North half of the campus of Smith College. He built a log house where he lived until 1681, when it was burned, being set on fire by a negro, Jack, a servant of Samuel Wolcott, who took a brand of fire from the hearth and swung it up and down to 'find victuals.' The new house built in its place remained standing until 1826. Lieutenant Clarke organized in 1661 a train band of sixty men, which he commanded in King Philips's War. He served as selectman twenty years, and was also a judge of the county court. He died at Northampton, July 18, 1690, and in 1884 a monument was erected to his memory by his descendants. The old gravestone is still preserved. He married (first) Sarah ?, who died May 6, 1675; (second) November 15, 1676, Sarah Cooper, who died May 6, 1688."
    In "History of Northampton Massachusetts From Its Settlement in 1654" by James Russell Trumbull - Printed in Northampton in 1898:
    "He was one of the early settlers of Northampton, arriving 1659. Townsman 20 times; he was the first citizen of Northampton to be elected deputy to the General Court, and 14 times between 1663 and 1682 was elected to that office, although not consecutively. He was Associate Justice of county court for 26 years; In 1662, he was authorized by the General Court to solemnize marriages, being the first person in that town to hold that responsible position. Frequently appointed by the Court to deal with Indians. He was chosen Lieutenant of the first military company ever organized here, when that was the office of highest rank to which the company, on account of its small number of men was entitled, and was in active service during King Philip's War and was at the same time a member of the military committee of the county. He supplied the commissary department to some extent during King Philip's Indian War and the Legislature ordered the Treasurer to pay him in 1676 'thirty-eight pounds, eighteen shillings for "Porke and bisket" delivered to the countrys use.' He helped to build the first grist mill and the first saw mill in the town. He was greatly interested in promoting the new settlement of Squakheag (Northfield) and is named as having served as town clerk at the second settlement of that place, although there is no evidence that he ever lived there. Several times he was chosen commissioner, with others, to determine disputed boundaries between Northampton and neighboring towns. His home lot, one of the largest, covered the north half of the Smith College property. Tradition states that here he built a block house upon this lot which was used for refuge during the Indian troubles. His dwelling house was burned in 1681, having been set on fire by a negro, as he averred in search of food.* In 1671, he was licensed to sell 'wine, cider or liquor for a year.' He had large grants of land in the meadows and elsewhere and purchased many acres in different parts of the town. All his lands, embracing nearly two hundred acres, with the exception of 7 3/4 acres, he disposed of before his death to his sons, reserving to himself an annuity of 24 pounds. There are no records remaining by which to judge of his private life and character. Only through the public duties he was called upon to perform can any estimate of him as a man and a citizen be reached. He was a hard worker, a pioneer in the best sense of the term. Enduring hardship with cheerfulness, meeting difficulty half way, conquering oftener than conquered, he stands one of the most prominent among the promoters of the plantation. Founder of a numerous family that has had worthy representatives during the entire history of the town, and whose descendants are scattered throughout the land, his name is honored and respected wherever it is found."
    *From "The History of Northampton" by J.R Trumbull p. 376-377 Burning of William Clarke's House: The house of Lieut. William Clarke, situated very nearly on the ground now occupied by the main Smith College building, was burned on the night of July 14, 1681. It was built of logs, and Clarke and his wife were living in it at the time. A negro, named Jack, set the house on fire. He confessed the deed and pretended that it was done accidentally, while he was searching for food, swinging a burning brand to light his way. Jack did not belong in town; he was a servant to Samuel Wolcott of Wethersfield; was a vicious character, a forerunner of the great army of tramps now everywhere wearying the patience of the public, and had already been before the courts for other misdemeanors. His object undoubtedly, was robbery, and it is not probable that he went about the house searching for food even, with a lighted pine torch in his hands. Very likely after stealing whatever he could lay his hands upon, he set the house on fire to conceal the robbery, or from spite against William Clarke, who was at this time 72 years of age.
    Capture and Punishment of the Incendiary. Jack was arrested in Brookfield or Springfield, and was brought before the court in Boston, where he pled not guilty. When his confession was read to him, however, he acknowledged it, and the jury brought in a verdict of guilty. The court believed his confession as to setting the house on fire, but did not credit his statement that it was done carelessly. He was sentenced to be "hanged by the neck till he be dead and then taken down and burnt to ashes in the fire with Maria, the negro." Maria was under sentence of death for burning the houses of Thomas Swan, and of her master, Joshua Lamb, in Roxbury. She was burned alive. Both of these negroes were slaves. Why the body of Jack was burned is not known.
    Note 1: Many slaves were burned alive in New York and New Jersey, and in the southern colonies, but few in Massachusetts. Note 2: Tradition has handed down the following items concerning the burning of Clarke's house: The negro fastened the door on the outside so that no one could escape, and set the fire on the outside. William Clarke injured his hands considerably (pounded them, it is said) in his endeavor to escape, and his wife was somewhat burned. John Clarke, grandson of William, a little more than a year old, was brought out of the house and laid beside the fence. There was powder in one of the chambers, and when it exploded the ridge pole was blown across the road, and one end forced into the ground. The negro had taken offense at something William Clarke had done in his official capacity, and set the fire in a spirit of revenge. He was discovered either at Brookfield, Springfield, or near New Haven, and identified by means of a jack-knife in his possession that belonged to the Clarkes.
    (The above notes are from Trumbull, and should be taken in the context of a late 19th century writer.)
    One last item that will hopefully clear up some confusion - although Lt. William spelled his last name Clarke, only one of his children continued to do so after his death. That was his namesake - William Jr., who left Northampton about 1698 for Lebanon, Connecticut. Most of William Jr.'s offspring continued this tradition for several generations before dropping the 'E.' Some, to this day, never have.
    William Clarke Lt. and Sarah ? had the following children:
    i. Sarah Clark was born in Dorchester, Suffolk, Massachusetts 21 Jun 1638. Sarah died 21 Jun 1638 in Dorchester, Suffolk, Massachusetts, at less than one year of age. Died as an infant in Dorchester.
    ii. Jonathan Clark was born in Dorchester, Suffolk, Massachusetts 1 Oct 1639. Jonathan died about 1 Oct 1639 in Dorchester, Suffolk, Massachusetts, at less than one year of age. Died as an infant in Dorchester.
    iii. Nathaniel Clark was born 27 Jan 1641.
    iv. Experience Clark was born in Dorchester, Suffolk, Massachusetts 30 Mar 1643. Experience died 1662 Northampton, Hampshire, Massachusetts, at 19 years of age.
    v. Increase Clark was born in Dorchester, Suffolk, Massachusetts 1 Mar 1646. Increase died 24 Apr 1662 Northampton, Hampshire, Massachusetts, at 16 years of age.
    vi. Rebeckah Clark was born Feb 1649.
    vii. John Clark Deacon was born 1 May 1651.
    viii. Samuel Clark was born 23 Oct 1653.
    ix. William Clarke Capt. was born 3 Jul 1656.

    Extract from the "Canney/Peckham Genealogy":
    He sailed from Plymouth, England, March 30 1630 in the "Mary & John" and arrived at Nantucket May 30, 1630. Settled at Dorchester, Massachusetts between 1636-1639.
    The first fully proven record of William Clark is found in Dorchester Church Records which show that William Clarke and wife, Sarah, were members of that Church on 23 August 1636. The births of their ten children, the first on 21 June 1638, were recorded in Dorchester.
    The Town Records of Dorchester show that William Clarke had obtained about 8 acres of land at Squantum neck from William Hill before 23 Feb 1638 because he sold an acre and a quarter there on that date. On 20 Oct 1639, he sold the remaining seven acres at 20s per acre.
    He was elected a Selectman in Dorchester in 1645, 1647 and 1650. He was also elected a Rater (assessor) and in 1652/3 was one of four men appointed to lay out land for Augustine Clement and was elected a Fence Viewer in 1653, 1656, 1657 and 1658.
    In May 1653 William Clarke was one of twenty-four petitioners to the Massachusetts General Court who desired to inhabit "Nonotuck" (Northampton). All except Clarke were from Connecticut. On 3 October 1653, the first meeting of the proprietors for Northampton was held at either Springfield or Hartford and "William Clark" attended and signed as a proprietor. However, he didn't move there because in 1654, he was chosen one of a committee in Dorchester to lay out a way to the burying place and was also named a "boundsman" to determine the bounds between Dorchester and Braintree in 1654; between Dorchester and Dedham in 1655; and in 1658 between Dorchester and Braintree and Dorchester and Roxbury. In 1658 he was on a committee to lay out land for Gamaleel Beaman, and in 1659, to lay out meadow lots and to survey land for a school. However, the committee named to lay out the Beaman lot later included John Capen, appointed to take the place of William Clarke who had moved to Northampton.
    By 1659 Northampton was a frontier outpost of about 200 inhabitants with two horse paths going from it - one to Springfield and one to Hadley. Worcester County was still a wilderness so the settlement was surrounded by Indians, except for the group at Springfield to the south. No church organization existed: a plain, thatched structure with one door and two windows served as the house of worship.
    Six men emigrated to Northampton at the suggestion of Mr. Mather. William Clarke and John Strong, Aaron Cook, David Wilton, Henry Cunliffe and Henry Woodward contributed much to the small town. They took a leading part in the management of town affairs.
    The original land records of Northampton show that on the 20th of the 10th month 1659, William Clarke was granted a 12 acre lot lying between the highway and the Mill River. Also, 55 or 60 acres in 3 lots in Manhan Meadows and 15 acres at the end of Venturers Field. Besides these grants, the records show that William Clarke bought from John Pinchon 30 acres in two parcels in the lower end of Manhan Meadows. He continued to purchase land until he owned about 200 acres in Northampton.
    At the organization of a train band or company of militia, of 60 men, William Clarke was chosen the highest officer, Lieutenant. This was considered a very important position and secured to him ever after the distinguishing title of Lt. Clarke. On 8 October 1662 he was officially commissioned a Lieutenant by the General Court and also authorized to solemnize Marriages in Northampton.
    Many books give this story: "His wife rode on horseback with two baskets, called panniers, slung across the horse, carrying one boy in each basket, and a baby in her lap, her husband, fifty years old, proceeding on foot." This is probably a true enough account of the Clarkes' move to Northampton since the ages of their children agree and also because Gov. Winthrop in his Journal states that this was the customary mode of travel, with furniture and possessions going by boat.
    On 14 July 1681 the Clarke home was burned by Jack, a slave belonging to Samuel Wolcott of Wethersfield. Tradition has handed down the following account of this incident: Jack fastened the door on the outside so that no one could escape and set the fire on the outside. William injured his hands considerably in trying to escape and his wife was somewhat burned. John Clarke, grandson of William, a little more than a year old, was brought out of the house and laid beside the fence. There was powder in one of the chambers and when it exploded the ridge pole was blown across the road and one end forced into the ground. The court Decided that Jack had acted maliciously and he was sentenced to hang.
    Much sickness prevailed throughout Connecticut in 1689 and the epidemic, as it might be called, found its way up the river. Twenty-five persons are recorded on the death roll of Northampton in 1690, including 11 men who were original settlers of the town and had always been identified with its interests. Lt. William Clarke was one of those who died of this ailment in July of 1690. His original head and foot stone are still extant in the Bridge Street Cemetery, Northampton.
    His will dated 7 April 1689, with codicil dated 16 July 1690, was proved at Springfield 30 Sept. 1690 by Medad Pomeroy and Joseph Parsons. By this will he gave to son John 10s and the 7 acres he had bought from Joshua Carter provided John pay 32 to the Executor, otherwise that lot was to go to the estate. John, also, was to pay 20 to the two children of William's son, Nathaniel, Deceased, and 5 promised to the school. William gave his son, Samuel, 20 in addition to the land already deeded to him and confirmed to his daughters, Rebecca and Sarah, lands already given to them. His household furniture and silver were to be equally divided among his sons Samuel and William and daughters Rebecca and Sarah. Son William was named Executor.

    Extract from "A Record of Some of the Branches of the Lieut. William Clark Family of Northampton, Massachusetts" compiled by Deacon Simeon Clark of Amherst, Massachusetts, 1883 (housed in the Forbes Library, Northampton, Massachusetts):
    The first ancestor of the Clark family that came to this country from England was William Clark. He sailed from Plymouth, England, in the ship "Mary and John" on the 30th of March, 1630, and arrived the 30 of May, following, and was among the first settlers in Dorchester, near Boston.
    In 1659 Elazer Mather, son of Richard, was preaching at Northampton and the town voted to give a quantity of land to such men as Mr. Mather should invite to come and settle there. William Clark was one of that number and came to Northampton with his family. His wife rode on horseback with two baskets called panniers, slung across the horse, carrying one boy in each basket, and one in her lap, her husband on foot, thus they moved to Northampton, and land was set off to them in 1659.
    In 1660 Mr. Clark was chosen selectman, 1661, with others, he formed the first church in Northampton, and was chosen lieutenant of the train-band. He held other important offices and died July 19, 1690 at age 81. He had four sons, William, John, Samuel, and Nathaniel.

    Extract from the "Compendium of American Genealogy" by Frederick A. Virkus, published 1925, 1970, and 1987:
    William Clarke came from England on the "John and Mary" in 1630. He was at Dorchester before 1635; selectman, 1641-50, 64. He removed to Northampton, Massachusetts 1660 where he served as a rep. Gen Ct. 1663-1676; was made lieutenant 1661; county judge 14 yrs.; mill owner; one of the incorporators of the First Church at Northampton. He also served in King Philip's War. He married Sarah Strong who died 1675. He then married Sarah, widow of Thomas Cooper of Springfield, Massachusetts.

    Extract from the "Genealogical Dictionary of the First Settlers to New England" by James A. Savage:
    William Clark is first in Dorchester 1636 where he was a selectman 1646-7. He moved in 1659 to Northampton, Massachusetts, for which he was rep. 1663-1676 and lieut. in Philip's War. His wife died 6 Sep 1675 and he married 15 Nov 1676, Sarah, widow of Thomas Cooper of Springfield, who died 8 May 1688 and he died 18 Jul 1690.

    Extract from "Records of the Descendants of Hugh Clark of Watertown, Mass. 1640-1866" by John Clark, Boston, 1866, Alfred Mudge & Sons, Printers:
    This book is properly restricted to the descendants of one of these immigrants, Hugh Clark, of Watertown, but it may not be irrelevant to begin with a brief sketch of the principal families of the name of Clark, which are now found in New England.
    Of these families the most numerous is that which is settled in the valley of the Connecticut, from Bellows' Falls to Hartford, especially in Northampton and vicinity. Branches of this family are also found in Berkshire County and in the State of New York. Its ancestor in this country was Lieut. William Clark, who came from England in the ship "Mary and John," leaving Plymouth, England, March 30, 1630, and landing at Nantucket, now Hull, the 30th of the following May. He first settled in Dorchester, Massachusetts, but removed to Northampton in the year 1657.
    Lieut. William Clark m. Sarah _____, who died Sept. 6, 1675. He m. (2d) Nov. 15, 1676, Sarah Cooper, of Springfield, who died May 8, 1688. He died in Northampton, July 18, 1690, ae. 81.
    Children.
    1. Sarah, b. June 21, 1638; d.y.
    2. Jonathan, b. Oct. 1, 1639.
    3. Nathaniel, b. Jan. 27, 1642; m. May 8, 1663, Mary Meakins; d. Mar. 30, 1669
    4. Experience, b. Mar. 30, 1643
    5. Increase, b. Mar. 1, 1646; d. 1662
    6. Rebecca, b. 1648; m. Dec. 9, 1669, Israel Rust
    7. John, b. 1651; m. July 12, 1677, Rebecca Cooper, who d. 1678. He m. (2d) Mar. 16, 1679, Mary Strong. Chil., John, Nathaniel, Ebenezer, Increase, Mary, Rebecca, Experience, Abigail, Noah, Thankful, Josiah.
    8. Samuel, b. 1653; m. Mar. 1, 1682, Elizabeth Edwards. Chil., Elizabeth, Sarah, Samuel, Benoni, Joanna, Benjamin, Obadiah, Miriam.
    9. William, b. July 3, 1656; m. July 15, 1680, Hannah Strong, who d. Feb.11, 1693. He m. (2d) Mary _____. Chil., Hannah, Abigail, William, Jonathan, Thomas, Joseph, Benoni, Timothy, Gershom.
    10. Sarah, b. 1659; m. Dec. 3, 1675, John Parsons.

    Extract from an unknown source:
    Lieut. William Clark, b. Plymouth, Dorset, England, 1609, came to New England 1630, settled at Dorchester, Massachusetts, before 1635; removed to Northampton, Massachusetts, 1659. William Clarke emigrated in 1630 at the age of 21, on the ship "William and Mary" with Rev. Mr. Warham. He settled first at Dorchester where he officiated as townsman from 1646 to 1653. He was one of the early settlers of Northampton Massachusetts. Townsman 20 times; deputy to General Court 14 times between 1663 and 1682; associate justice of county court for 26 years; frequently appointed to deal with Indians. Was lieutenant of the military company and saw active service in King Philip's War. Helped to supply the Commissary department during King Philip's War; helped to build the first grist mill and first saw mill in the town. His home lot, one of the largest, covered the north half of the Smith College property.

    Extract from "Trumbull's History of Northampton":
    A man of quiet dignity, self-contained, and a ready resource, he bore a more conspicuous part in the early history of the town than any others who lived here during the first 20 years of its existence.

    Will: 7 Apr 1689 Northampton, Hampshire, Massachusetts

    Burial: Bridge Street Cemetery in Northampton, Hampshire, Massachusetts [source: Find A Grave.com]. 11075779

    Gravestone inscription:
    Liueten [Lieutenant]
    William Clarke
    Aged 81
    Years. He dyed
    July 19 Ano 1690

    Monument inscription:
    Lieutenant
    William Clarke
    Died July 19, 1690
    Aged 81 years
    Erected by his descendants
    1884

    The Rhode Family Tree has photographs of the gravestone and the monument.




    Marriage 1 Sarah Holton b: 29 Jun 1613 in Chardstock, Dorsetshire, England
    • Married: 1638 in Barnstable, Dorchester, Massachusetts 4
    Children
    1. Has Children Rebecca Clark b: 1 Mar 1649/50 in Dorchester, Suffolk, Massachusetts

    Marriage 2 Sarah Russell or Slye b: 29 Aug 1615 in Lapworth, Warwickshire, England
    • Married: 15 Nov 1676 in Northampton, Hampshire, Massachusetts 5

    Sources:
    1. Title: FamilySearch
      Author: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
      Publication: March 22, 1999 - present
      Note: Ancestral File, International Genealogical Index, and Pedigree Resource File
      Repository:
      Note: http://www.familysearch.org/eng/search/frameset_search.asp
      Media: Electronic
    2. Title: A public member tree on Ancestry.com
      Publication: 2011-present
      Note: authors of the family trees are not usually identified.
      Repository:
      Note: Ancestry.com
      Media: Electronic
    3. Title: Gravestone
      Repository:
      Media: Tombstone
    4. Title: Horrocks, Philips, Winget, Keeler, Clark, Watson, Lockwood, Strong, Gates and ancestors
      Author: Lloyd A Horrocks
      Publication: January 13, 2007
      Note: Lloyd A Horrocks email: horrocks2-osu.edu (use an "@" for the "-")
      Repository:
      Note: Rootsweb.com
      Media: Electronic
    5. Title: Layton/Holt Genealogy
      Author: Olive Layton
      Publication: April 12, 2001
      Note: Olive Layton email: olayton2-aol.com (use an "@" for the "-")
      Repository:
      Note: Rootsweb.com
      Media: Electronic

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