Edward B. Walker (1756-1838)

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  • ID: I13871
  • Name: Clarence Ossie Smith 1 2 3 4
  • Sex: M
  • Birth: 23 MAY 1892 in Newport, Cocke County, Tennessee 5 6 7 8 9
  • Death: 16 FEB 1924 in his residence, Sweetwater, Nolan County, Texas 10 11 12 8 of pulmonary hemorrhage with pulmonary tuberculosis contributing 13
  • Event: Death Certificate Obtained: Nolan County, Texas, 1924, #6449
  • Event: World War 1 Draft Card On file
  • Event: Nickname Pop Boy Smith
  • Occupation: Major Leage Baseball, Pitcher, Chicago White Sox (1913) and Cleveland Indians (1916-1917)
  • Event: To Do-01 1920 Census (A)
  • Burial: 18 FEB 1924 Elmwood Cemetery, Birmingham, Jefferson County, Alabama 14 8 15
  • Event: Tombstone Photo unmarked per cemetery office
  • Medical Information: tall, medium build, gray eyes, black hair 16
  • Note:
    Clarence, known as Pop-Boy, made his major league debut with the Chicago White Sox in 1913. He played for the Cleveland Indians in 1916 and 1917. Contact me for a full narrative on him. I also have several other articles on file; those transcribed here mostly reflect those which most speak to major events in Clarence's life.
    ==
    Washington Post, 17 February 1924, page S3:
    FORMER BIG LEAGUER DEAD

    Sweetwater, Tex., Feb. 16. -- Clarence O. ("Pop Boy") Smith, former member of the Chicago White Sox and Cleveland Indians' pitching staff, died suddenly at his home here today. Recently he bas been manager of the Sweetwater and Ballinger teams in the West Texas league.
    ==
    Atlanta Constitution, 27 June 1912, page 13:

    Clarence Smith, Baron Hurler, Got Start While Selling Drinks at the Birmingham Ball Park

    “I picked him up out of the grandstand in Birmingham while he was peddling soft drinks,” declared Carlton Molesworth, manager of the Birmingham baseball team, in referring to Clarence Smith, the youngster who pitched Sunday’s dame in Montgomery for the Barons.

    “In 1910 Smith was pitching to some of our players in Birmingham, and I saw he had something,” continued the Baron chief. “I signed him up in the spring of 1911 for $90 per month and farmed him out to Anniston. Due largely to his pitching, Anniston won the pennant that year. This year Smith has worked in nine games, winning six and losing three. My opinion is he’s going to develop into a wonder and there’s nothing to keep him from getting into the big league. He’s only 19 years old.”

    Molesworth things that in Smith he has made one of the biggest finds of any manager in the south. He declares that the young hurler has a superb arm and a fine head; in fact, all the assets necessary for a splendid pitcher. And the peculiar part of it all is that less than two years ago Smith was prancing through the Baron grandstand popping soda water for a living.

    The Baron manager was formerly a resident of Montgomery and played in center with the Billikens for several seasons. He is making a great sucess with the Baons this year and most fo [sic] the fans in Dixie think unquestionable that “Moly” has corralled the greatest bunch of ball players in the south.

    “I don’t know whether I’ve got the best team,” said Moly, “but you see we are leading, and I’ll let the public judge what our team is. I can say only that I am perfectly satisfied and the people of Birmingham are delighted. Our attendance is fine. We haven’t fallen under 1,800 at any home game.”
    ==
    Atlanta Constitution, 3 July 1913:

    "Pop Boy" Smith Bought By Locals
    Former Baron Comes from White Sox -- Expected to Report Here Friday -- Should Strengthen Staff.

    Clarence "Pop Boy" Smith, the youngster who twirled such sensational ball for the Birmingham Barons last season and aided them in winning a pennant, is now a Cracker. He will probably report here Friday and make debut Saturday.

    Smith has been purchased from the Chicago White Sox, to whom he was sold last year by the Barons. The Crackers had to pay a steep price for the youngster, but money was no object with the local clumb in endeavering to get a good, reliable, winning pitcher.

    Smith twirled in thirty-six games for the Barons last season. He got credit for only twenty-three. He one fifteen of these and lost eight, a percentage of .652. His fielding was fairly good, and his hitting just about as pitchers usually hit. His control was excellent as he walked only two men a game, while he fanned an average of 4 to the game.

    Smith was very efective last season against Mobile, Montgomery and Chattanooga, the three clubs that are now leading the Crackers in the pennant race, and if his jinx on these three clubs hols out, the Crackers will be benefited materially.

    Just who will go to make room for Smith is not known.
    ==
    Atlanta Constitution, 4 July 1913:
    Comiskey Backs Down on Locals
    Recalls Proposition for "Pop Boy" Smith -- The Former Baron's Work Wednesday the Cause

    Charles Comiskey The [sic] Old Roman owner of the Chicago White sox [sic] has backed down on his proposition to the Crackers and the locals may not get Clarence Pop Boy Smith after all.

    Comiskey offered Smith to the Crackers for $2000 under optional agreement. This was in a night letter Tuesday night. The local club accepted his proposition by wire Wednesday morning.

    Thursday morning the local club received a wire from Comiskey calling off the deal.

    Smith pitched the last four innings of the game against the Detroit Tigers on Wednesday and held that hard hitting crowd to one hit. This made such an impression that the White Sox decided to call off the trade.

    The local club is still hot after Smith however and hope yet to be able to land him. If they wanted to be nasty about it they could force Comiskey to turn the pitcher over to the locals but they will hardly take such a step.

    It is more than likely that if Comiskey does not let the Crackers have Smith that he will send another hurler down her this request having been made of him by the local club.
    ==
    Atlanta Constitution, 26 July 1913:

    "Pop Boy" Smith Will Not Feel Iron Hand
    Chicago, July 25 -- Pitcher Smith, of the Chicago Americans, will not field the heavy hand of the national commission for masquerading last Sunda as a member of the Coulon Athletics, a semi-professional club.

    President B.B. Johnson, of the American league said last night that Smith was just a youngster knew [sic] no better and had been forgiven. He said that the players with eastern clubs who were fined last year for playing with semu-professional teams on off days were veterans and knew they were violating rules.
    ==
    Oakland [California] Tribune, 17 September 1913, not numbered:

    Sox Pitching Wonfer Peanut Man

    Only a few years ago Clarence Smith of the Chicago White Sox was a peanut butcher at the Birmingham baseball park.

    I have Tom Dawson's word for this, and Tom being a native of the south should know whereof he speaks.

    Smith's fondness for baseball led him to the park when he was a youngster, and he was willing to do any kind of work around the place in order to be present at the games.

    In the course of time he managed to get out on the field with the players in the preliminary practice, and was eventually given a tryout.

    Two years ago he won a regular berth, and last season he was a big factor in winning the southern association pennant for Birmingham.

    His advent into the professional ranks was similar to that of Harry Lord of the White Sox and Chester Chadbourne of Portland. Both of these were mere minions around the Worchester baseball park before they broke into the game on a money basis. Their chance came when a couple of the regular Wochester players sprung a tendon, and they have been playing ball ever since.
    ==
    The Daily Review [Decatur, Illinois], 1 April 1914, page 5:

    Late Stories of the White Sox

    Harried by San Francisco fans who were "joshing" him from the bleachers at a game the other day, Clarence Smith, a pitcher for the Chicago White Sox, retorted:

    "I should worry; we'll be back in the United States next week."

    Smith learned Tuesday that his exile was to be much longer than expected, for the White Sox management sold him to the Venice Coast league team.
    ==
    Oakland Tribune, 31 July 1914, page 18:

    Baseball by Billy Fitz
    ...Clarence Smith, the pitcher whom Comiskey left here when the White Sox departed for the east after their spring training last spring, is chafing under his enforced idleness. When the Tigers left for Sacramento at the befinning of the week, Smith was left at hom. Hap Hogan is not trying to sell or trade Smith, but says he will not stand in the way of the latter's going if he can find anything better.
    ==
    Oakland Tribune, 10 September 1914, page 12:

    Diamond Flashes
    ...Clarance Smith, the young gentleman who while with the White Sox during their training trip out here expressed a desired to leave this, our Golden State and "get back to America," and who was incidentally allowed to remain behind by Comisky [sic] to play with the Venice Tigers, is a great favorite with southern fans. Oh [unreadable word].

    'Tis said that in a recent fame a man stole home on dear little Clarence while said Clarence was explaining one of his new curves to the umpire, thereby causing Clarence (not the umpire), great wrath. Californians argue that after Clarence stays in this State out of America for a while he will be better used to the barbarian ways of the westerners.
    ==
    Washington Post, 21 August 1916, page 6
    Indians Buy Players.

    New Orleans, Aug. 20. -- President Heinmann, of the New Orleans Southern Association baseball club, announced last night the sale to the Cleveland club of the American League of Pitcher Clarence Smith, Catcher Henry Deberry and Outfielder Milo Allison.
    ==
    Atlanta Constitution, 17 December 1913, page 10:
    "Pop Boy" Smith May Go To The Lookouts

    It is reported that Clarence Pop Boy Smith the former Birmingham star is going to be with the Chattanooga Lookouts during the coming campaign.

    It is said that the Chicago White Sox are going to turn Smith over to the Lookouts. Smith was practically promised to the locals last season. Bill Smith may horn in and take a chance with the young right hander if the Sox do not want him any more. He would help the local staff immensely.
    ==
    Atlanta Constitution, 31 March 1914, page 9:
    Clarence Smith Sold

    Chicago March 30 -- Clarence Smith pitchers [sic] today was sold by the Chicago Americans to the Venice Club of the Pacific Coast League. Smith came to the White Sox last year from the Birmingham Club of the Southern League.
    ==
    Atlanta Constitution, 14 March 1915, page 5b:

    Farrell's Decisions.

    Auborn, N.Y., March 13 -- Secretary Farrell of the National Association of Professional Baseball leagues [sic], announced the following releases today:

    Released by purchase -- By Portland, Ore., Clarence Smith to New Orleans and Ray Moran to Atlanta.
    ==
    Washington Post, 22 September 1916, page 8:
    Fifteen Hits Off Johnson
    By Stanley T. Milliken

    Tight in Pinches, Though, but Sensational Fielding Enables Indians to Beat Nationals by 3 to 2 Count.

    Cleveland, Ohio, Sept. 21. – Chief Lee Fohl’s lowly Indians sprang a suggent attack on the Nationals today and conquered Walter Johnson after thirteen innings of battling. Not before this year have the Indians so maltreated one of Griffith’s pitchers as they did this afternoon, amassing a total of 15 hits for 21 bases in the getaway.

    However, out of this number of whacks they could muster but three tallies, and would have been beaten but for the wild tactics of the Nationals on the bases. It ended, 3 to 2, “Tuck” Turner following Wamby and Gandil with a base knock before a runner could be retired in that hard-luck round.

    Johnson received one of his worst beatings of the year – that is as far as the base-hit column is concerned – but he managed to keep those well scattered, pulling out of tight spots on numerous occasions. “Pop-Boy” Smith started for the Fohlites, but he gave way to Moeller, a pinch hitter, in the ninth, and Gould finished.

    Rice Hits Heavily.
    Smith had two bad innings in which he was scored on and but for some crazy base running, the contest would have ended with the ninth frame. The Nationals showed nothing but a two-man offense. Sam Rice, making his first appearance in the outfield since his recent illness, faced Smith four times. In this number of trips he banged out a single, double and triple, and scored both the Nationals’ runs.

    Behind Rice came Joe Judge, whose single in the second shoved Sam over, while his double in the fourth had the same effect. Off Smith the Nationals garnered six hits, Rice and Judge accounted for five of them. Three came off Gould, but the Nationals were good to him and three opportunity to the winds.

    Poor Base Running Costly.
    McBride was caught at the place in the second inning, when Johnson flied short to Graney, while Judge was run down between second and third in the fourth, when he should have held the bad. But poorer work marked the twelfth. The Nationals had Judge on second and Johnson on first, when Leonard lined a single to left. Morgan, coaching at third, sent Judge home to a sure death, for Graney has the ball before Judge rounded third.

    The thirteenth was even worse. Foster started with a single, but was thrown out trying to stretch the blow. Then Milan followed with a double. He wandered too far off second with the result that Gould’s toss to Wamby retired him before he could return to the bad.

    Those were the fair opportunities the Nationals had to get runs. Johnson, by clever pitching in the pinches, held his opponents at bay while the Nationals were tossing off victory for him. The Nationals were never in the rear until after the Indians finished it in the thirteenth.

    [The box score and explicit details are not included in this transcription. Clarence Smith was at bat three times with no hits. Moeller batted for Smith in the ninth. Smith walked one player, Gould 3; Smith gave up 5 hits in 9 innings, Gould 3 in 4 innings. The Nationals scored 1 point each in the second and forth innings, while the Indians scored 1 point each in the second, fifth, and thirteenth innings.]
    ==
    Washington Post, 21 September 1916, page 10:
    Noted of Nationals
    By S.T. Milliken

    ..."Pop Boy" Smith or Gould will work for Cleveland tommorrow. Shaw is Griffith's choice...
    ==
    Washington Post, 25 March 1917, page S1:

    INDIANS USE BATS WELL.
    Hit in the Pinches and Easily Beat New Orleans.

    New Orleans, La., March 24. – The Cleveland Americans hit in the pinches today and defeated the New Orleans Southern Association team, 6 to 2. Coumbe pitched five innings for Cleveland, giving way to “Pop-boy” Smith, who was recruited from New Orleans. Score:

    [Line score not included in this transcription, Cleveland scored 2 runs in the 1st, 3rd, and 8th, with 6 runs, 10 hits, and 1 error, while New Orleans scored 2 in the second with 2 runs, 9 hits, and 1 error.]
    ==
    Unable to find conclusively in the 1920 Census; could be the Clarence and Lena Smith with a daughter Mary M. in Richmond, Wayne County, Indiana, but ages and birth places are substantially off.

    1930 Census, Abilene, Taylor County, Texas, precinct 1, ED 221-13, SD 8, page 179b, dwelling 491, family 596:
    Sullivan, Holmes F., head, owns home worth $4000, has radio, male, 30, married at 27, TX, AL, TN, commercial[?] trader, dry goods, for wages, not a veteran
    ___, Lena E., wife, female, 37, married at 34, TN, TN, TN, beauty operator, beauty shop, own account
    Smith, Mary M., daughter, female, 10, single, TN, TX, TN, in school
    Medlock, Paralee, servant, "negro", 48, divorced [crossed out?], TX, TX, MS, servant, private home, for wages
    1750 Chestnut. Enumerated 15 April 1930 by Mrs. Mona M. Martin; all white, literate, speak English unless noted.




    Father: William Bruce Smith b: FEB 1863 in (prob) Sevier County, Tennessee
    Mother: Margaret C. Dennis b: MAY 1864 in (prob) Sevier County, Tennessee

    Marriage 1 Lena (md. Clarence Ossie Smith) ? b: 11 DEC 1891 in (prob) Tennessee
      Children
      1. Has Children Mary Margaret Smith b: 1 OCT 1919 in Nashville, Davidson County, Tennessee

      Sources:
      1. Title: Personal Records: Vella Allen
        Author: Allen, Vella Ruth (Dennis)
        Note: Vella Allen kept detailed records of what she knew of the Dennis and Allen families; most of it relates to people she knew or had reason to know about. No actual sources are quoted. She lived in the area where this family lived for generations and died in 1994. She was also the mother of Roma Elizabeth (Allen) Walker and grandmother of Phillip Andrew Walker and very well known to both.
        Note: For hints only; not a primary source
        Repository:
        Note: Roma Elizabeth (Allen) Walker
        Media: Manuscript
        Text: son Clarence
      2. Title: United States Census - 1900
        Note: The 1900 Census added a great deal of information, such as the exact month and year of birth, years married, and a number of other elements. The enumeration date was 1 June 1900.
        Repository:
        Note: National Archives and Records Administration
        Media: Microfilm
        Page: Newport, Cocke County, Tennessee, CD 6, SD 1, ED 163, page 85, dwelling 229, family 263
        Text: son "Clarrance"
      3. Title: Death Certificate: Clarence Ossie Smith
        Publication: Nolan County, Texas, 1924, #6449
        Note: Informant was his wife, Lena E. Smith.
        Repository:
        Media: Official Document
        Text: son of W.B. Smith and Margaret Smith
      4. Title: United States Census - 1910
        Note: The 1910 Census actually contains a bit less data than the 1900 Census. The enumeration date changed to 15 April 1910.
        Repository:
        Note: National Archives and Records Administration
        Media: Microfilm
        Page: Birmingham, ward 15, precinct 9, Jefferson County, Alabama, SD 9, ED 95, page 160b, dwelling 539, family 559
        Text: son Clarence
      5. Title: United States Census - 1900
        Note: The 1900 Census added a great deal of information, such as the exact month and year of birth, years married, and a number of other elements. The enumeration date was 1 June 1900.
        Repository:
        Note: National Archives and Records Administration
        Media: Microfilm
        Page: Newport, Cocke County, Tennessee, CD 6, SD 1, ED 163, page 85, dwelling 229, family 263
        Text: born May 1892 in Tennessee
      6. Title: World War 1 Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918
        Publication: Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah, 2005
        Note: Original data: United States, Selective Service System. World War I Selective Service System Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration. M1509, 4,582 rolls.
        Repository:
        Media: Electronic
        Page: Clarence Ossie Smith, New Orleans, Louisiana, board 2
        Text: born 23 May 1892 in Newport, Tennessee
      7. Title: Death Certificate: Clarence Ossie Smith
        Publication: Nolan County, Texas, 1924, #6449
        Note: Informant was his wife, Lena E. Smith.
        Repository:
        Media: Official Document
        Text: born May 22 "18", age 32 years, 8 months, no days, in Alabama
      8. Title: FindAGrave.com
        Note: User-submitted tombstone transcriptions; photos and obituaries sometimes included. While many records are added clearly the result of blanket cemetery transcriptions, others may very well have been posted by people who have not personally visited and checked the tombstone. Quite a few people fill in details that are not on the stone and may or may not be correct. Unless a tombstone photo is specifically mentioned in the footnote, no photo was present for the entry at the time of the citation, making the citation more suspect.
        Note: Not edited; subject to transcription and many other types of errors
        Repository:
        Note: http://www.findagrave.com/
        Media: Electronic
        Text: Clarence Ossie "Pop-Boy" Smith, 23 May 1892-16 February 1924, "Professional baseball player 1913-1917. Pitcher for the Chicago White Sox and the Cleveland Indians.", Elmwood Cemetery, Birmingham, Jefferson County, Alabama; record added 11 May 2010 by Carol Tessein
      9. Title: United States Census - 1910
        Note: The 1910 Census actually contains a bit less data than the 1900 Census. The enumeration date changed to 15 April 1910.
        Repository:
        Note: National Archives and Records Administration
        Media: Microfilm
        Page: Birmingham, ward 15, precinct 9, Jefferson County, Alabama, SD 9, ED 95, page 160b, dwelling 539, family 559
        Text: age 18, born in Alabama
      10. Title: Texas Death Index, 1903-2000
        Publication: Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah, 2006
        Note: Original data: Texas Department of Health. Texas Death Indexes, 1903-2000. Austin, TX, USA: Texas Department of Health, State Vital Statistics Unit. All attributions here are suspect since parents and birth date are not mentioned; the ceriticates should always be ordered for verification. Often wrong on marriage status. As with the birth index, records become sparse before about 1930.
        Note: Original source should be obtained
        Repository:
        Media: Electronic
        Text: "Clarnce O. Smith", Nolan County, 16 February 1924, #6449
      11. Title: Obituary: Clarence Ossie Smith
        Author: Washington Post
        Publication: 17 February 1924, page S3
        Note: Transcription in his notes.
        Repository:
        Media: Newspaper
        Text: "Sweetwater, Tex., Feb. 16. -- Clarence O. ("Pop Boy") Smith, former member of the Chicago White Sox and Cleveland Indians' pitching staff, died suddenly at his home here today."
      12. Title: Death Certificate: Clarence Ossie Smith
        Publication: Nolan County, Texas, 1924, #6449
        Note: Informant was his wife, Lena E. Smith.
        Repository:
        Media: Official Document
        Text: died 16 February 1924 in Sweetwater, Nolan County, Texas
      13. Title: Death Certificate: Clarence Ossie Smith
        Publication: Nolan County, Texas, 1924, #6449
        Note: Informant was his wife, Lena E. Smith.
        Repository:
        Media: Official Document
        Text: died of pulmonary hemorrhage with pulmonary tuberculosis contributing
      14. Title: Death Certificate: Clarence Ossie Smith
        Publication: Nolan County, Texas, 1924, #6449
        Note: Informant was his wife, Lena E. Smith.
        Repository:
        Media: Official Document
        Text: removal/burial 18 February 1924 in Birmingham, Alabama
      15. Title: Personal Correspondence: Elmwood Cemetery, Birmingham, Jefferson County, Alabama
        Author: Walker, Phillip Andrew & Richard Gatto
        Publication: 22-23 September 2010
        Note: Email and phone conversations regarding the burials of William Bruce Smith, his wife, and two children in the family plot at Elmwood Cemetery.
        Repository:
        Media: Electronic
        Text: "buried" 16 February 1924 in Elmwood Cemetery
      16. Title: World War 1 Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918
        Publication: Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah, 2005
        Note: Original data: United States, Selective Service System. World War I Selective Service System Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration. M1509, 4,582 rolls.
        Repository:
        Media: Electronic
        Page: Clarence Ossie Smith, New Orleans, Louisiana, board 2
        Text: tall, medium build, gray eyes, black hair
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