Edward B. Walker (1756-1838)

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  • ID: I00233
  • Name: Mallie Lucinda Walker 1 2 3 4
  • Sex: F
  • Birth: 28 OCT 1874 in Walkers Ford, Union County, Tennessee 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14
  • Death: 27 FEB 1957 in Pleasant Hill, Cumberland County, Tennessee 15 2 8 16 14
  • Residence: 6 APR 1929 Lone Mountain, Claiborne County, Tennessee 17
  • Education: BET 1883 AND 1887 Studied music under Miss Lizzie Purdy of Henderson, Tennessee 18
  • Occupation: BET 1889 AND 1919 Taught music 19
  • Burial: Lynnhurst Cemetery, Adair Drive, Knoxville, Knox County, Tennessee 20 14
  • Event: Tombstone Photo On file
  • Event: Death Certificate Get: Cumberland County, Tennessee, 1957, #02787
  • Note: In hospital for 2 years, 2 months before death. All appear to have been Methodists and born and reared near Lone Mountain where house is still standing.



    Father: James Taylor Walker b: 28 NOV 1848 in Bear Creek, Claiborne County, Tennessee
    Mother: Laura Virginia Larmer b: 21 JAN 1856 in (near) Rose Hill, Lee County, Virginia

    Marriage 1 Joseph Sherman Yoakum b: 11 NOV 1871 in Lone Mountain, Claiborne County, Tennessee
    • Married: 15 SEP 1895 in Claiborne County, Tennessee 21 22 23 24 25 26
    • Event: Performed by in Rev. James A Ruble at Sam Atkin's House 27
    Children
    1. Has No Children Thelma B. Yoakum b: 23 DEC 1896 in Lone Mountain, Claiborne County, Tennessee
    2. Has No Children Margaret Lenore Yoakum b: 17 DEC 1898 in Lone Mountain, Claiborne County, Tennessee
    3. Has No Children Robert Taylor Yoakum b: 17 NOV 1900 in Lone Mountain, Claiborne County, Tennessee
    4. Has Children Henry Clay Yoakum b: 15 JUN 1903 in Lone Mountain, Claiborne County, Tennessee
    5. Has No Children Paul Devine Yoakum b: 3 MAY 1905 in Lone Mountain, Claiborne County, Tennessee
    6. Has Children Anne B. Yoakum b: 4 NOV 1913 in Lone Mountain, Claiborne County, Tennessee

    Sources:
    1. Title: Record of descendants of Edward Walker, Revolutionary soldier of North Carolina and Tennessee
      Author: Burns, Annie Walker
      Publication: Frankfort, Kentucky: published privately, 1929
      Note: Transcriptions of family letters and other documents. The book is divided into two sections and pagination restarts; all references here are to the second section. Mrs. Burns collected information specifically to join historical societies and did not compile a more traditional family history book. Still, there are many letters from family members living at that time that provide valuable information. However, the letters are not even chronologically shown, and some of them clearly reflect information learned during the exchange of letters instead of knowledge held previously. Very careful analysis and detailed prior knowledge of the family relationships is necessary to extract appropriate evidence. For instance, one must carefully separate family tradition from personal knowledge of people they would have known well. A careful reading of the letters and attention to timelines does tend to indicate who knew who and who would have most definitely been in a position to know exact family relationships, especially among living people. Some evidence is extremely invaluable. For instance, although other evidence exists, the letters from Mary (Walker) Lewis, combined with those who knew her personally and her family relationship, provide one of the clearest indicators connecting Edward Sr.'s sons Edward and Joseph together as brothers. Likewise, the letters from Elisabeth (Walker) Click and Melbourn Green Walker and the clear evidence of who knew them and their relationships to the family tie Jacob, Henry, John Gilmore, and the other sons and daughters of Edward, Jr., together quite well with strong evidence. Not all evidence is as strong. In short, the book contains valuable source material, but very close scrutiny is required to determine which portions of it constitute source material.
      Repository:
      Note: Daughters of the American Revolution Library, Washington, DC
      Media: Book
      Page: 74
      Text: letter from Mallie (Walker) Yoakum to author, 6 April 1929, indicates herself and Fleda as the two children
    2. Title: Walker family records: from the shadows of Cumberland Gap, Claiborne County, Tazewell, Tennessee
      Author: Burns, Annie Walker
      Publication: Washington, DC: published privately by Lucy Kate McGhee, 1957
      Note: Various records about her own close family and others in the Claiborne County area.
      Repository:
      Note: Daughters of the American Revolution Library, Washington, DC
      Media: Book
      Page: 2-R
      Text: Roy Samuel Walker refers to Mallie (Walker) Yoakum as his half-sister who died 27 February 1957
    3. Title: Old Time Tazewell
      Author: Hansard, Mary A.
      Publication: Kingsport, Tennessee: Kingsport Press, Inc., 1979
      Note: Written in the 1890s, this book contains sketches of a number of families based on the memories of the author. Her memory is usually quite good. The book is widely available in a number of libraries and for purchase. The dates of the various articles appear to vary, but since the author died in 1899, 1899 can easily be used as a date before which someone died if listed in the book as having died. RAW has a copy.
      Repository:
      Note: Library of Congress
      Media: Book
      Page: 200-201
      Text: Joseph Yoakum married Malla Walker, a daughter of Taylor Walker
    4. Title: United States Census - 1880
      Note: The 1880 Census was the first to specifically ask for the relationships of each household member to the head of household and also included birthplaces of mother and father as well as other additional information. The likely errors of earlier censuses also applied in 1880. The enumeration date was 1 June 1880.
      Repository:
      Note: National Archives and Records Administration
      Media: Microfilm
      Page: Union County, Tennessee, CD 3, SD 1, ED 112, page 146d, dwelling & family 140
      Text: daughter Mallie L.
    5. Title: Record of descendants of Edward Walker, Revolutionary soldier of North Carolina and Tennessee
      Author: Burns, Annie Walker
      Publication: Frankfort, Kentucky: published privately, 1929
      Note: Transcriptions of family letters and other documents. The book is divided into two sections and pagination restarts; all references here are to the second section. Mrs. Burns collected information specifically to join historical societies and did not compile a more traditional family history book. Still, there are many letters from family members living at that time that provide valuable information. However, the letters are not even chronologically shown, and some of them clearly reflect information learned during the exchange of letters instead of knowledge held previously. Very careful analysis and detailed prior knowledge of the family relationships is necessary to extract appropriate evidence. For instance, one must carefully separate family tradition from personal knowledge of people they would have known well. A careful reading of the letters and attention to timelines does tend to indicate who knew who and who would have most definitely been in a position to know exact family relationships, especially among living people. Some evidence is extremely invaluable. For instance, although other evidence exists, the letters from Mary (Walker) Lewis, combined with those who knew her personally and her family relationship, provide one of the clearest indicators connecting Edward Sr.'s sons Edward and Joseph together as brothers. Likewise, the letters from Elisabeth (Walker) Click and Melbourn Green Walker and the clear evidence of who knew them and their relationships to the family tie Jacob, Henry, John Gilmore, and the other sons and daughters of Edward, Jr., together quite well with strong evidence. Not all evidence is as strong. In short, the book contains valuable source material, but very close scrutiny is required to determine which portions of it constitute source material.
      Repository:
      Note: Daughters of the American Revolution Library, Washington, DC
      Media: Book
      Page: 74
      Text: letter from Mallie (Walker) Yoakum to author, 6 April 1929, indicates that she was born 28 October 1874 but does not list a location; may have been Pleasant Hills in Knox County; cites family Bible and the burial records at Lynnhurst Cemetery in Knoxville, Knox County, Tennessee
    6. Title: Record of descendants of Edward Walker, Revolutionary soldier of North Carolina and Tennessee
      Author: Burns, Annie Walker
      Publication: Frankfort, Kentucky: published privately, 1929
      Note: Transcriptions of family letters and other documents. The book is divided into two sections and pagination restarts; all references here are to the second section. Mrs. Burns collected information specifically to join historical societies and did not compile a more traditional family history book. Still, there are many letters from family members living at that time that provide valuable information. However, the letters are not even chronologically shown, and some of them clearly reflect information learned during the exchange of letters instead of knowledge held previously. Very careful analysis and detailed prior knowledge of the family relationships is necessary to extract appropriate evidence. For instance, one must carefully separate family tradition from personal knowledge of people they would have known well. A careful reading of the letters and attention to timelines does tend to indicate who knew who and who would have most definitely been in a position to know exact family relationships, especially among living people. Some evidence is extremely invaluable. For instance, although other evidence exists, the letters from Mary (Walker) Lewis, combined with those who knew her personally and her family relationship, provide one of the clearest indicators connecting Edward Sr.'s sons Edward and Joseph together as brothers. Likewise, the letters from Elisabeth (Walker) Click and Melbourn Green Walker and the clear evidence of who knew them and their relationships to the family tie Jacob, Henry, John Gilmore, and the other sons and daughters of Edward, Jr., together quite well with strong evidence. Not all evidence is as strong. In short, the book contains valuable source material, but very close scrutiny is required to determine which portions of it constitute source material.
      Repository:
      Note: Daughters of the American Revolution Library, Washington, DC
      Media: Book
      Page: 81
      Text: letter from Mallie (Walker) Yoakum to author, 21 April 1929, indicates that she was born and raised at Walkers Ford but does not indicate which county; it may have been Claiborne County
    7. Title: Daughters of the American Revolution Application - Anne Yoakum Modlin
      Author: Modlin. Anne Yoakum
      Note: Anne, after contact with Annie Walker Burns, joined the Daughters of the American Revolution, number 466233, in Knoxville, Tennessee, on 9 February 1959
      Note: Good for recent family information
      Repository:
      Note: Daughters of the American Revolution Library, Washington, DC
      Media: Official Document
      Text: states that Mallie Lucinda Walker was born 28 October 1874 at Walkers Ford, Tennessee, and died at Pleasant Hill, Tennessee, on 27 February 1957; unfortunately, there are many places called Pleasant Hill in Tennessee, and the exact county is not specified
    8. Title: Walker family records: from the shadows of Cumberland Gap, Claiborne County, Tazewell, Tennessee
      Author: Burns, Annie Walker
      Publication: Washington, DC: published privately by Lucy Kate McGhee, 1957
      Note: Various records about her own close family and others in the Claiborne County area.
      Repository:
      Note: Daughters of the American Revolution Library, Washington, DC
      Media: Book
      Page: 3-R
      Text: 5 July 1957 letter to author from Margaret Lenore Yoakum, states that Mallie L. Walker was born 28 October 1874, married Joseph S. Yoakum, 20 September, 1985, and died 27 February, 1957 after 2 years and 2 months in the hospital
    9. Title: United States Census - 1900
      Note: The 1900 Census added a great deal of information, such as the exact month and year of birth, years married, and a number of other elements. The enumeration date was 1 June 1900.
      Repository:
      Note: National Archives and Records Administration
      Media: Microfilm
      Page: Claiborne County, Tennessee, CD 10, SD 250, ED 10, page 146a, dwelling & family 87
      Text: born June 1875[!] in Tennessee
    10. Title: United States Census - 1880
      Note: The 1880 Census was the first to specifically ask for the relationships of each household member to the head of household and also included birthplaces of mother and father as well as other additional information. The likely errors of earlier censuses also applied in 1880. The enumeration date was 1 June 1880.
      Repository:
      Note: National Archives and Records Administration
      Media: Microfilm
      Page: Union County, Tennessee, CD 3, SD 1, ED 112, page 146d, dwelling & family 140
      Text: age 5, born in Tennessee
    11. Title: United States Census - 1910
      Note: The 1910 Census actually contains a bit less data than the 1900 Census. The enumeration date changed to 15 April 1910.
      Repository:
      Note: National Archives and Records Administration
      Media: Microfilm
      Page: Claiborne County, Tennessee, CD 3, SD 1, ED 20, page 71b, dwelling 187, family 188
      Text: age 35, born in Tennessee
    12. Title: United States Census - 1920
      Note: The enumeration date was 1 January 1920.
      Repository:
      Note: National Archives and Records Administration
      Media: Microfilm
      Page: Claiborne County, Tennessee, CD 3, SD 1, ED 25, page 80b, dwelling & family 157
      Text: age 45, born in Tennessee
    13. Title: United States Census - 1930
      Note: The enumeration date was 1 April 1930, except in Alaska, with an enumeration date of 1 October 1929
      Repository:
      Note: National Archives and Records Administration
      Media: Microfilm
      Page: Claiborne County, Tennessee, CD 3, ED 13-5, SD 7, page 196b, dwelling & family 306
      Text: age 45, born in Tennessee
    14. Title: FindAGrave.com
      Note: User-submitted tombstone transcriptions; photos and obituaries sometimes included. While many records are added clearly the result of blanket cemetery transcriptions, others may very well have been posted by people who have not personally visited and checked the tombstone. Quite a few people fill in details that are not on the stone and may or may not be correct. Unless a tombstone photo is specifically mentioned in the footnote, no photo was present for the entry at the time of the citation, making the citation more suspect.
      Note: Not edited; subject to transcription and many other types of errors
      Repository:
      Note: http://www.findagrave.com/
      Media: Electronic
      Text: tombstone photo for Lynnhurst Cemetery, Knoxville, Knox County, Tennessee, posted by Sue Reneau Damewood 26 February 2010: "Mallie Walker Yoakum/October 28, 1874/February 27, 1957"
    15. Title: Daughters of the American Revolution Application - Anne Yoakum Modlin
      Author: Modlin. Anne Yoakum
      Note: Anne, after contact with Annie Walker Burns, joined the Daughters of the American Revolution, number 466233, in Knoxville, Tennessee, on 9 February 1959
      Note: Good for recent family information
      Repository:
      Note: Daughters of the American Revolution Library, Washington, DC
      Media: Official Document
      Text: states that Mallie Lucinda Walker was born 28 October 1874 at Walkers Ford, Tennessee, and died at Pleasant Hill, Tennessee, on 27 February 1957; unfortunately, there are many places called Pleasant Hill in Tennessee, and the exact county is not specified; may have been Pleasant Hills in Knox County; cites family Bible and the burial records at Lynnhurst Cemetery in Knoxville, Knox County, Tennessee
    16. Title: Tennessee Death Records, 1949-2005
      Author: Shelby County, Tennessee, Register
      Note: Bills itself as a partial index to statewide death certificates but does not explain “partial”. The original version covered data from 1949 to 2005 with several errors. Data for 1949 was sparse, and there were other losses, such as few records May-December 1962 and other time periods. When the notation “(sparse)” is used, a record could not be found but the list of certificates for that days appears to be incomplete. In the late 1980s and early 1990s, more than 75% of the data indicates a place of death incorrectly as “Humphreys County”.

      The database was updated in November 2010 with records through 2009. Additionally, most of the missing records are now in the database, and the Humphreys County problem also appears to have been corrected. Some records in 1962-1963 seem to have some unusual counties of residence and may be incorrect in that regard but otherwise seem reasonable. Death certificates listed as “not found” without a 2010 date have not yet been searched in the new version.
      Note: Original certificates should be obtained
      Repository:
      Note: http://register.shelby.tn.us/
      Media: Electronic
      Text: Mallie L. Yoakum, age 82, died 27 February 1957 in Cumberland County, resided in Claiborne County, Tennessee, married, female, white, certificate 02787
    17. Title: Record of descendants of Edward Walker, Revolutionary soldier of North Carolina and Tennessee
      Author: Burns, Annie Walker
      Publication: Frankfort, Kentucky: published privately, 1929
      Note: Transcriptions of family letters and other documents. The book is divided into two sections and pagination restarts; all references here are to the second section. Mrs. Burns collected information specifically to join historical societies and did not compile a more traditional family history book. Still, there are many letters from family members living at that time that provide valuable information. However, the letters are not even chronologically shown, and some of them clearly reflect information learned during the exchange of letters instead of knowledge held previously. Very careful analysis and detailed prior knowledge of the family relationships is necessary to extract appropriate evidence. For instance, one must carefully separate family tradition from personal knowledge of people they would have known well. A careful reading of the letters and attention to timelines does tend to indicate who knew who and who would have most definitely been in a position to know exact family relationships, especially among living people. Some evidence is extremely invaluable. For instance, although other evidence exists, the letters from Mary (Walker) Lewis, combined with those who knew her personally and her family relationship, provide one of the clearest indicators connecting Edward Sr.'s sons Edward and Joseph together as brothers. Likewise, the letters from Elisabeth (Walker) Click and Melbourn Green Walker and the clear evidence of who knew them and their relationships to the family tie Jacob, Henry, John Gilmore, and the other sons and daughters of Edward, Jr., together quite well with strong evidence. Not all evidence is as strong. In short, the book contains valuable source material, but very close scrutiny is required to determine which portions of it constitute source material.
      Repository:
      Note: Daughters of the American Revolution Library, Washington, DC
      Media: Book
      Page: 74
      Text: letter from Mallie (Walker) Yoakum to author, 6 April 1929, indicates Lone Mountain as the return address
    18. Title: Record of descendants of Edward Walker, Revolutionary soldier of North Carolina and Tennessee
      Author: Burns, Annie Walker
      Publication: Frankfort, Kentucky: published privately, 1929
      Note: Transcriptions of family letters and other documents. The book is divided into two sections and pagination restarts; all references here are to the second section. Mrs. Burns collected information specifically to join historical societies and did not compile a more traditional family history book. Still, there are many letters from family members living at that time that provide valuable information. However, the letters are not even chronologically shown, and some of them clearly reflect information learned during the exchange of letters instead of knowledge held previously. Very careful analysis and detailed prior knowledge of the family relationships is necessary to extract appropriate evidence. For instance, one must carefully separate family tradition from personal knowledge of people they would have known well. A careful reading of the letters and attention to timelines does tend to indicate who knew who and who would have most definitely been in a position to know exact family relationships, especially among living people. Some evidence is extremely invaluable. For instance, although other evidence exists, the letters from Mary (Walker) Lewis, combined with those who knew her personally and her family relationship, provide one of the clearest indicators connecting Edward Sr.'s sons Edward and Joseph together as brothers. Likewise, the letters from Elisabeth (Walker) Click and Melbourn Green Walker and the clear evidence of who knew them and their relationships to the family tie Jacob, Henry, John Gilmore, and the other sons and daughters of Edward, Jr., together quite well with strong evidence. Not all evidence is as strong. In short, the book contains valuable source material, but very close scrutiny is required to determine which portions of it constitute source material.
      Repository:
      Note: Daughters of the American Revolution Library, Washington, DC
      Media: Book
      Page: 81
      Text: letter from Mallie (Walker) Yoakum to author, 21 April 1929, indicates that she studied music under Miss Lizzie Purdy of Henderson, Tennessee, from age 9 to age 13
    19. Title: Record of descendants of Edward Walker, Revolutionary soldier of North Carolina and Tennessee
      Author: Burns, Annie Walker
      Publication: Frankfort, Kentucky: published privately, 1929
      Note: Transcriptions of family letters and other documents. The book is divided into two sections and pagination restarts; all references here are to the second section. Mrs. Burns collected information specifically to join historical societies and did not compile a more traditional family history book. Still, there are many letters from family members living at that time that provide valuable information. However, the letters are not even chronologically shown, and some of them clearly reflect information learned during the exchange of letters instead of knowledge held previously. Very careful analysis and detailed prior knowledge of the family relationships is necessary to extract appropriate evidence. For instance, one must carefully separate family tradition from personal knowledge of people they would have known well. A careful reading of the letters and attention to timelines does tend to indicate who knew who and who would have most definitely been in a position to know exact family relationships, especially among living people. Some evidence is extremely invaluable. For instance, although other evidence exists, the letters from Mary (Walker) Lewis, combined with those who knew her personally and her family relationship, provide one of the clearest indicators connecting Edward Sr.'s sons Edward and Joseph together as brothers. Likewise, the letters from Elisabeth (Walker) Click and Melbourn Green Walker and the clear evidence of who knew them and their relationships to the family tie Jacob, Henry, John Gilmore, and the other sons and daughters of Edward, Jr., together quite well with strong evidence. Not all evidence is as strong. In short, the book contains valuable source material, but very close scrutiny is required to determine which portions of it constitute source material.
      Repository:
      Note: Daughters of the American Revolution Library, Washington, DC
      Media: Book
      Page: 81
      Text: letter from Mallie (Walker) Yoakum to author, 21 April 1929, indicates that she taught from age 15 to about age 45
    20. Title: Knox County Cemeteries Database
      Author: McGinnis, Robert
      Note: Includes only names and only a very few cemeteries. Anything in brackets was added by the author and is not on the stone.
      Note: More detailed records should be sought
      Repository:
      Note: http://www.knoxcotn.org/cgi-bin/cemsearch.cgi
      Media: Electronic
      Text: Mallie [Walker] Yoakum, Lynnhurst Cemetery
    21. Title: Record of descendants of Edward Walker, Revolutionary soldier of North Carolina and Tennessee
      Author: Burns, Annie Walker
      Publication: Frankfort, Kentucky: published privately, 1929
      Note: Transcriptions of family letters and other documents. The book is divided into two sections and pagination restarts; all references here are to the second section. Mrs. Burns collected information specifically to join historical societies and did not compile a more traditional family history book. Still, there are many letters from family members living at that time that provide valuable information. However, the letters are not even chronologically shown, and some of them clearly reflect information learned during the exchange of letters instead of knowledge held previously. Very careful analysis and detailed prior knowledge of the family relationships is necessary to extract appropriate evidence. For instance, one must carefully separate family tradition from personal knowledge of people they would have known well. A careful reading of the letters and attention to timelines does tend to indicate who knew who and who would have most definitely been in a position to know exact family relationships, especially among living people. Some evidence is extremely invaluable. For instance, although other evidence exists, the letters from Mary (Walker) Lewis, combined with those who knew her personally and her family relationship, provide one of the clearest indicators connecting Edward Sr.'s sons Edward and Joseph together as brothers. Likewise, the letters from Elisabeth (Walker) Click and Melbourn Green Walker and the clear evidence of who knew them and their relationships to the family tie Jacob, Henry, John Gilmore, and the other sons and daughters of Edward, Jr., together quite well with strong evidence. Not all evidence is as strong. In short, the book contains valuable source material, but very close scrutiny is required to determine which portions of it constitute source material.
      Repository:
      Note: Daughters of the American Revolution Library, Washington, DC
      Media: Book
      Page: 80
      Text: letter from Mallie (Walker) Yoakum to author, 6 April 1929, indicates that she married "J. S. Yoakum" 15 September 1895 at "Dr. Sam Atkins" house by Rev. James A. Ruble, presiding elder of the Methodist Episcopal church
    22. Title: Daughters of the American Revolution Application - Anne Yoakum Modlin
      Author: Modlin. Anne Yoakum
      Note: Anne, after contact with Annie Walker Burns, joined the Daughters of the American Revolution, number 466233, in Knoxville, Tennessee, on 9 February 1959
      Note: Good for recent family information
      Repository:
      Note: Daughters of the American Revolution Library, Washington, DC
      Media: Official Document
      Text: states that Joseph Sherman Yoakum and Mallie Lucinda Walker were married 15 September 1895
    23. Title: Walker family records: from the shadows of Cumberland Gap, Claiborne County, Tazewell, Tennessee
      Author: Burns, Annie Walker
      Publication: Washington, DC: published privately by Lucy Kate McGhee, 1957
      Note: Various records about her own close family and others in the Claiborne County area.
      Repository:
      Note: Daughters of the American Revolution Library, Washington, DC
      Media: Book
      Page: 3-R
      Text: 5 July 1957 letter to author from Margaret Lenore Yoakum, states that Mallie L. Walker was born 28 October 1874, married Joseph S. Yoakum, 20 September, 1985, and died 27 February, 1957 after 2 years and 2 months in the hospital; the marriage date given in this source disagrees with other sources, including her mother; a check at the courthouse would resolve the issue of 5 days
    24. Title: Old Time Tazewell
      Author: Hansard, Mary A.
      Publication: Kingsport, Tennessee: Kingsport Press, Inc., 1979
      Note: Written in the 1890s, this book contains sketches of a number of families based on the memories of the author. Her memory is usually quite good. The book is widely available in a number of libraries and for purchase. The dates of the various articles appear to vary, but since the author died in 1899, 1899 can easily be used as a date before which someone died if listed in the book as having died. RAW has a copy.
      Repository:
      Note: Library of Congress
      Media: Book
      Page: 200-201
      Text: Joseph married Malla Walker, a daughter of Taylor Walker
    25. Title: United States Census - 1910
      Note: The 1910 Census actually contains a bit less data than the 1900 Census. The enumeration date changed to 15 April 1910.
      Repository:
      Note: National Archives and Records Administration
      Media: Microfilm
      Page: Claiborne County, Tennessee, CD 3, SD 1, ED 20, page 71b, dwelling 187, family 188
      Text: both married once for 15 years
    26. Title: United States Census - 1930
      Note: The enumeration date was 1 April 1930, except in Alaska, with an enumeration date of 1 October 1929
      Repository:
      Note: National Archives and Records Administration
      Media: Microfilm
      Page: Claiborne County, Tennessee, CD 3, ED 13-5, SD 7, page 196b, dwelling & family 306
      Text: she was married at 20, him at 23
    27. Title: Record of descendants of Edward Walker, Revolutionary soldier of North Carolina and Tennessee
      Author: Burns, Annie Walker
      Publication: Frankfort, Kentucky: published privately, 1929
      Note: Transcriptions of family letters and other documents. The book is divided into two sections and pagination restarts; all references here are to the second section. Mrs. Burns collected information specifically to join historical societies and did not compile a more traditional family history book. Still, there are many letters from family members living at that time that provide valuable information. However, the letters are not even chronologically shown, and some of them clearly reflect information learned during the exchange of letters instead of knowledge held previously. Very careful analysis and detailed prior knowledge of the family relationships is necessary to extract appropriate evidence. For instance, one must carefully separate family tradition from personal knowledge of people they would have known well. A careful reading of the letters and attention to timelines does tend to indicate who knew who and who would have most definitely been in a position to know exact family relationships, especially among living people. Some evidence is extremely invaluable. For instance, although other evidence exists, the letters from Mary (Walker) Lewis, combined with those who knew her personally and her family relationship, provide one of the clearest indicators connecting Edward Sr.'s sons Edward and Joseph together as brothers. Likewise, the letters from Elisabeth (Walker) Click and Melbourn Green Walker and the clear evidence of who knew them and their relationships to the family tie Jacob, Henry, John Gilmore, and the other sons and daughters of Edward, Jr., together quite well with strong evidence. Not all evidence is as strong. In short, the book contains valuable source material, but very close scrutiny is required to determine which portions of it constitute source material.
      Repository:
      Note: Daughters of the American Revolution Library, Washington, DC
      Media: Book
      Page: 80
      Text: letter from Mallie (Walker) Yoakum to author, 6 April 1929
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