Edward B. Walker (1756-1838)

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Edward B. Walker (1756-1838) of Duplin County, North Carolina, and Sullivan, Claiborne, and Hancock Counties, Tennessee. For more information, see my web site. This is my work file, and a few lines are noted as being speculative. Always researching, so this tree will change. If you are related to any of these folks or researching this family, I am always interested in hearing from you.

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  • ID: I00195
  • Name: Isaac Walker 1 2 3 4
  • Sex: M
  • Birth: 27 OCT 1822 in Mulberry Creek, Claiborne County, Tennessee, now/Hancock County, Tennessee 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
  • Death: 22 JUN 1895 in his residence, Straight Creek, Claiborne County, Tennessee 16 17 5 9 12
  • Occupation: Farmer
  • Religion: Originally Baptist; apparently became Methodist
  • Burial: Burch Cemetery, Lone Mountain Road, Claiborne County, Tennessee 5 9 12
  • Event: Nickname Ike
  • Event: Tombstone Photo On file
  • Medical Information: blue eyes, dark hair, dark complexion 18
  • _HEIG: 5 ft. 10 in.
  • Note:
    Isaac raised his family on a farm on Straight Creek near his brother Jacob; see Jacob's notes for more information. He probably was raised a Methodist but for a while attended Straight Creek Missionary Baptist Church with his wife, from which he was excluded, going back to the Methodist church.

    Granddaughter Jennie C. Walker in the 1880 Census is currently an unknown. William, Rachel, and Daniel were all married at the apparent time of Jennie's birth and seem to be unlikely candidates for parents of Jennie. Sarah is assumed to have died before her husband remarried, placing her death a little too early, although certainly within the range of error; one would assume that the child would carry the Meyers name, though. Samuel was too young, leaving Joseph K. as a possible candidate. Still, in that era, a child out of wedlock usually stayed with the mother or the mother's family.
    ==
    Old Time Tazewell, pp. 204-206:

    A SKETCH OF ISAAC AND JACOB WALKER'S FAMILIES

    Isaac Walker and Jacob Walker were brothers. The were raised nine miles east of Tazewell, a few miles above Cedar Fork Church. They purchased farms on Straight Creek, seven miles west of Tazewell, and settled on those farms. Isaac Walker's wife was Miss Haynes of Union County. She was the oldest sister of Daniel and William Haynes, two well known citizens of said county. They raised four sons and two daughters, according to my recollection: William, Joseph, Daniel, and Samuel; the daughters were Sarah and Rachel.

    William, oldest son of Isaac Walker, owns and lives on a farm on Straight Creek. His wife was Miss Lyford. They have raised a nice, respectable family. They are good citizens.

    Samuel Walker, youngest son, is a nice, intelligent young man of a good education.

    Sarah died; and Joseph, Rachel, and Daniel live in the West, if I am not wrongly informed.

    Mr. Isaac Walker, father of the above-named family, passed away a few years ago at a ripe old age. His widow is still living at the old homestead at the advanced age of eightly [sic] years. He was a good citizen. He belonged to the Methodist Church; his wife, to the Baptist.
    ==
    1850 Census, Claiborne County, Tennessee, 7th Subdivision Eastern District, dwelling & family 720:
    Walker, Isaac, 27, male, farmer, $150 real estate, born in Tennessee, literate
    ___, Mary, 28, female, born in Tennessee, illiterate
    ___, William A., 1, male, born in Tennessee
    ___, Rachael, 2/12, female, born in Tennessee
    Enumerated 2 October 1850 by George Cheek; all white.

    1860 Census, Claiborne County, Tennessee, 10th subdivision, page 349, dwelling & family 1297:
    Walker, Isaac, 37, male, farmer, real estate $1500, personal $613
    ___, Mary, 37, female
    ___, William, 12, male, in school
    ___, Rachael, 10, female, in school
    ___, Daniel, 7, male, in school
    ___, Sarah A., 4, female
    PO Tazewell; enumerated ca. 1 June 1880 by William G. Payne; all white, literate, speak English, born in Tennessee, parents in Tennessee unless noted.

    1870 Census, Claiborne County, Tennessee, CD 11, page 316, dwelling 39, family 33:
    Walker, Isaac, 47, male, farmer, real estate $1950, personal $380, male 21+
    ___, Mary, 48, female, keeping house, can read not write
    ___, William, 21, male, works on farm, personal $125
    ___, Rachel, 20, female
    ___, Daniel, 16, male, works on farm, in school
    ___, Sarah, 13, female, in school
    ___, Joseph, 9, male, in school
    ___, Samuel, 1, male
    PO Tazewell; enumerated 21 June 1870 by A. J. Greer; all white, literate, speak English, born in Tennessee unless noted.

    1880 Census, Claiborne County, Tennessee, page 17, CD 11, SD 1, ED 189, dwelling 153, family 160:
    Walker, Isaac, male, 57, married, farmer
    ___, Mary, female, 58, wife, married, keeping house, cannot write,
    ___, Joseph K., male, 19, son, farm laborer
    ___, Samuel, male, 11?, son, at home
    ___, Jennie C., female, 3, granddaughter, TN, "(Tenn)", TN
    Enumerated 14-15 June 1880; all white, single, born in Tennessee, parents in Tennessee, no occupation, literate unless noted.




    Father: Edward Walker , Jr. b: 7 SEP 1795 in (prob) Sullivan County, Tennessee
    Mother: Mahala Tussey b: 29 DEC 1793 in (prob) Sullivan County, Tennessee

    Marriage 1 Mary Haynes b: 10 MAY 1822 in Grainger County, Tennessee, now/Union County, Tennessee
    • Married: 20 JAN 1848 in Grainger County, Tennessee 19 20 21
    • Marriage License: 15 JAN 1848 in Obtained: Grainger County, Tennessee
    • Event: Performed by in Anderson Acuff, M.G. 21
    • Note: Based upon the ages of the children, the marriage likely took place in 1846 or early 1847. Although Old Time Tazewell indicates that Mary was from Union County, that county had not been created by 1846; it was created from parts of Claiborne, Campbell, Knox, Anderson, and Grainger Counties. Record of this marriage may, then, exist in any of those, although marriage indices of Claiborne and Campbell counties do not show this marriage. However, the marriage may have taken place in Hancock County during the confusion over its creation, and records of marriages there before 1930 are lost.
    Children
    1. Has Children William Anderson Walker b: 17 OCT 1848 in Claiborne County, Tennessee
    2. Has Children Rachel M. Walker b: 28 APR 1850 in Claiborne County, Tennessee
    3. Has Children Daniel Walker b: 22 SEP 1853 in Claiborne County, Tennessee
    4. Has Children Sarah A. Walker b: ABT 1856 in (prob) Claiborne County, Tennessee
    5. Has Children Joseph King Walker b: 3 SEP 1860 in Claiborne County, Tennessee
    6. Has Children Samuel Brown Walker b: 25 FEB 1869 in Straight Creek, Claiborne County, Tennessee

    Sources:
    1. Title: Record of descendants of Edward Walker, Revolutionary soldier of North Carolina and Tennessee
      Author: Burns, Annie Walker
      Publication: Frankfort, Kentucky: published privately, 1929
      Note: Transcriptions of family letters and other documents. The book is divided into two sections and pagination restarts; all references here are to the second section. Mrs. Burns collected information specifically to join historical societies and did not compile a more traditional family history book. Still, there are many letters from family members living at that time that provide valuable information. However, the letters are not even chronologically shown, and some of them clearly reflect information learned during the exchange of letters instead of knowledge held previously. Very careful analysis and detailed prior knowledge of the family relationships is necessary to extract appropriate evidence. For instance, one must carefully separate family tradition from personal knowledge of people they would have known well. A careful reading of the letters and attention to timelines does tend to indicate who knew who and who would have most definitely been in a position to know exact family relationships, especially among living people. Some evidence is extremely invaluable. For instance, although other evidence exists, the letters from Mary (Walker) Lewis, combined with those who knew her personally and her family relationship, provide one of the clearest indicators connecting Edward Sr.'s sons Edward and Joseph together as brothers. Likewise, the letters from Elisabeth (Walker) Click and Melbourn Green Walker and the clear evidence of who knew them and their relationships to the family tie Jacob, Henry, John Gilmore, and the other sons and daughters of Edward, Jr., together quite well with strong evidence. Not all evidence is as strong. In short, the book contains valuable source material, but very close scrutiny is required to determine which portions of it constitute source material.
      Repository:
      Note: Daughters of the American Revolution Library, Washington, DC
      Media: Book
      Page: 36
      Text: letter from Melbourn Green Walker to author, 25 April 1929; unfortunately, part of the information is clearly information he had recently received from others and not based upon direct knowledge; lists Isaac as a child of Edward
    2. Title: Record of descendants of Edward Walker, Revolutionary soldier of North Carolina and Tennessee
      Author: Burns, Annie Walker
      Publication: Frankfort, Kentucky: published privately, 1929
      Note: Transcriptions of family letters and other documents. The book is divided into two sections and pagination restarts; all references here are to the second section. Mrs. Burns collected information specifically to join historical societies and did not compile a more traditional family history book. Still, there are many letters from family members living at that time that provide valuable information. However, the letters are not even chronologically shown, and some of them clearly reflect information learned during the exchange of letters instead of knowledge held previously. Very careful analysis and detailed prior knowledge of the family relationships is necessary to extract appropriate evidence. For instance, one must carefully separate family tradition from personal knowledge of people they would have known well. A careful reading of the letters and attention to timelines does tend to indicate who knew who and who would have most definitely been in a position to know exact family relationships, especially among living people. Some evidence is extremely invaluable. For instance, although other evidence exists, the letters from Mary (Walker) Lewis, combined with those who knew her personally and her family relationship, provide one of the clearest indicators connecting Edward Sr.'s sons Edward and Joseph together as brothers. Likewise, the letters from Elisabeth (Walker) Click and Melbourn Green Walker and the clear evidence of who knew them and their relationships to the family tie Jacob, Henry, John Gilmore, and the other sons and daughters of Edward, Jr., together quite well with strong evidence. Not all evidence is as strong. In short, the book contains valuable source material, but very close scrutiny is required to determine which portions of it constitute source material.
      Repository:
      Note: Daughters of the American Revolution Library, Washington, DC
      Media: Book
      Page: 54-55
      Text: letter from Minerva Jane Walker to Laura (Walker) Wood, undated and unsigned but clearly 1929, lists each of the children and marriages again; see Minerva's notes for details
    3. Title: Old Time Tazewell
      Author: Hansard, Mary A.
      Publication: Kingsport, Tennessee: Kingsport Press, Inc., 1979
      Note: Written in the 1890s, this book contains sketches of a number of families based on the memories of the author. Her memory is usually quite good. The book is widely available in a number of libraries and for purchase. The dates of the various articles appear to vary, but since the author died in 1899, 1899 can easily be used as a date before which someone died if listed in the book as having died. RAW has a copy.
      Repository:
      Note: Library of Congress
      Media: Book
      Page: 204
      Text: identified as brother of Jacob, with far more detail; see Jacob Shuff Walker's notes
    4. Title: Family Bible: Edward Walker Jr.
      Note: Edward's original Bible was burned in a hotel fire in Newport, Tennessee, in 1912. A 19th century copy of the family records apparently belonging to his son Isaac is in the possession of Isaac's great grandson Bill Walker.
      Repository:
      Media: Manuscript
      Text: listed in family Bible
    5. Title: Cemeteries of Claiborne County, Tennessee
      Author: Johnson, Paul
      Publication: Tazewell, Tennessee: privately published, 1982
      Note: Vital statistics gleaned from tombstones in Claiborne County; a very good list but incomplete. Address of author: Route 4, Box 183, Tazewell 37879.
      Note: Subject to transcription errors and missed tombstones
      Repository:
      Note: Library of Congress
      Media: Book
      Page: 204
      Text: Burch Cemetery, Isaac Walker, 27 October 1822 to 22 June 1895
    6. Title: United States Census - 1850
      Note: The 1850 Census is the first to record all members of a household, although family relationships are not explicitly indicated; important other information, such as birthplace is also recorded. Like the earlier enumerations, ages and household composition was supposed to be as of 1 June 1850, and enumerators were much better trained than with earlier censuses. However, actual enumeration occurred many months after that date, and errors do occur. In addition, as with other censuses of the era, the enumerator may have gotten information from neighbors instead of an actual household member. Slave schedules were separate. The entire 1850 Census is essentially extant.
      Repository:
      Note: National Archives and Records Administration
      Media: Microfilm
      Page: Claiborne County, Tennessee, 7th Subdivision, Eastern District, dwelling & family 720
      Text: see his notes
    7. Title: Claiborne County, Tennessee, Vital Statistics, 1936-1946
      Author: Wiefering, Edna, editor
      Publication: Cleveland, Tennessee, Public LIbrary, 2002
      Note: Transcriptions of death certificates including only years but also parents.
      Note: Subject to transcription, omission, and other errors
      Repository:
      Note: Cleveland Public Library and personal collection
      Media: Book
      Page: 5
      Text: William Anderson Walker, age 90, born in Claiborne County, father Isaac Walker, born in Claiborne County, mother Polly Haynes, born in Union County, died 1938, certificate 16559
    8. Title: United States Census - 1880
      Note: The 1880 Census was the first to specifically ask for the relationships of each household member to the head of household and also included birthplaces of mother and father as well as other additional information. The likely errors of earlier censuses also applied in 1880. The enumeration date was 1 June 1880.
      Repository:
      Note: National Archives and Records Administration
      Media: Microfilm
      Page: Claiborne County, Tennessee, page 17, CD 11
      Text: age 57 correct, born in Tennessee
    9. Title: Tombstone Photographs: Burch Cemetery, Lone Mountain Road, Claiborne County, Tennessee
      Author: Walker, Phillip Andrew
      Note: Photos taken at Burch Cemetery in Claiborne County, Tennessee, on Straight Creek on 31 August 2005. Some taken in November 1992 and others 18 September 2008.
      Repository:
      Media: Photograph
      Text: on left: "Mary/Walker/Born/May. 10,1822/died/Oct. 13 1899"; on right: "Isaac/Walker/born/Oct. 27, 1827/died/Jun. 22, 1895"
    10. Title: United States Census - 1860
      Note: The 1860 Census schedules are similar to those from 1850 and subject to the same issues; the enumeration date was 1 June 1860. The entire 1860 Census is essentially extant.
      Repository:
      Note: National Archives and Records Administration
      Media: Microfilm
      Page: Claiborne County, Tennessee, 10th subdivision, page 349, dwelling & family 1297
      Text: age 37, born in Tennessee
    11. Title: United States Census - 1870
      Note: The 1870 Census was similar to those in 1850 and 1860 although it is the first to include full information about those who had been in slavery. Some additional personal information was also recorded, and, for the first time, enumerators had written instructions, leading to a much greater degree of accuracy, although, as with all early censuses, errors are possible for numerous reasons. The enumeration date was 1 June 1870, and essentially the entire 1870 Census is extant.
      Repository:
      Note: National Archives and Records Administration
      Media: Microfilm
      Page: Claiborne County, Tennessee, CD 11, page 316, dwelling 39, family 33
      Text: age 47, born in Tennessee
    12. Title: Tombstone Photographs: Tim Walker
      Author: Walker, Timothy Claude
      Note: Tim has photographed numerous tombstones throughout Claiborne, Hancock, and Union counties and has provided electronic versions to the compiler.
      Repository:
      Media: Tombstone
      Text: Burch Cemetery, Lone Mountain Road, Claiborne County, Tennessee: left: "Mary/Walker/Born/May 10, 1822/Died/Oct. 13 1899"; right: "Isaac/Walker/Born/Oct. 27, 1822/Died/June 22, 1895"
    13. Title: Death Certificate: Joseph King Walker
      Author: Missouri Secretary of State
      Publication: Neosho, Newton County, Missouri, 1911, certificate 15151
      Note: His son, Alfred Neil Walker, was the informant.
      Repository:
      Media: Official Document
      Text: son of Isaac Walker, born in Hancock County, Tennessee, and Mary Haynes born in Union County, Tennessee
    14. Title: Family Bible: Edward Walker Jr.
      Note: Edward's original Bible was burned in a hotel fire in Newport, Tennessee, in 1912. A 19th century copy of the family records apparently belonging to his son Isaac is in the possession of Isaac's great grandson Bill Walker.
      Repository:
      Media: Manuscript
      Text: "Isaac Walker was born on the 27 of October in the year of our lord 1822"
    15. Title: Death Certificate: William Anderson Walker
      Publication: Claiborne County, Tennessee, 1938, #16559
      Note: Informant was his son, James Ottis Walker.
      Repository:
      Media: Official Document
      Text: son of Isaac Walker, born in Claiborne County, and Polly Haynes, born in Union County, Tennessee
    16. Title: Record of descendants of Edward Walker, Revolutionary soldier of North Carolina and Tennessee
      Author: Burns, Annie Walker
      Publication: Frankfort, Kentucky: published privately, 1929
      Note: Transcriptions of family letters and other documents. The book is divided into two sections and pagination restarts; all references here are to the second section. Mrs. Burns collected information specifically to join historical societies and did not compile a more traditional family history book. Still, there are many letters from family members living at that time that provide valuable information. However, the letters are not even chronologically shown, and some of them clearly reflect information learned during the exchange of letters instead of knowledge held previously. Very careful analysis and detailed prior knowledge of the family relationships is necessary to extract appropriate evidence. For instance, one must carefully separate family tradition from personal knowledge of people they would have known well. A careful reading of the letters and attention to timelines does tend to indicate who knew who and who would have most definitely been in a position to know exact family relationships, especially among living people. Some evidence is extremely invaluable. For instance, although other evidence exists, the letters from Mary (Walker) Lewis, combined with those who knew her personally and her family relationship, provide one of the clearest indicators connecting Edward Sr.'s sons Edward and Joseph together as brothers. Likewise, the letters from Elisabeth (Walker) Click and Melbourn Green Walker and the clear evidence of who knew them and their relationships to the family tie Jacob, Henry, John Gilmore, and the other sons and daughters of Edward, Jr., together quite well with strong evidence. Not all evidence is as strong. In short, the book contains valuable source material, but very close scrutiny is required to determine which portions of it constitute source material.
      Repository:
      Note: Daughters of the American Revolution Library, Washington, DC
      Media: Book
      Page: 12
      Text: letter from Elisabeth (Walker) Click, unsigned but with obvious authorship, to author 26 July 1929, indicates that all of Edward's first set of children are dead at this point, with "Uncle John" having died about 2 years prior at age 92
    17. Title: Record of descendants of Edward Walker, Revolutionary soldier of North Carolina and Tennessee
      Author: Burns, Annie Walker
      Publication: Frankfort, Kentucky: published privately, 1929
      Note: Transcriptions of family letters and other documents. The book is divided into two sections and pagination restarts; all references here are to the second section. Mrs. Burns collected information specifically to join historical societies and did not compile a more traditional family history book. Still, there are many letters from family members living at that time that provide valuable information. However, the letters are not even chronologically shown, and some of them clearly reflect information learned during the exchange of letters instead of knowledge held previously. Very careful analysis and detailed prior knowledge of the family relationships is necessary to extract appropriate evidence. For instance, one must carefully separate family tradition from personal knowledge of people they would have known well. A careful reading of the letters and attention to timelines does tend to indicate who knew who and who would have most definitely been in a position to know exact family relationships, especially among living people. Some evidence is extremely invaluable. For instance, although other evidence exists, the letters from Mary (Walker) Lewis, combined with those who knew her personally and her family relationship, provide one of the clearest indicators connecting Edward Sr.'s sons Edward and Joseph together as brothers. Likewise, the letters from Elisabeth (Walker) Click and Melbourn Green Walker and the clear evidence of who knew them and their relationships to the family tie Jacob, Henry, John Gilmore, and the other sons and daughters of Edward, Jr., together quite well with strong evidence. Not all evidence is as strong. In short, the book contains valuable source material, but very close scrutiny is required to determine which portions of it constitute source material.
      Repository:
      Note: Daughters of the American Revolution Library, Washington, DC
      Media: Book
      Page: 35
      Text: letter from Melbourn Green Walker to author, 25 April 1929, states that all of Edward's children (presumably the first set), have died
    18. Title: Loyalty Oath: Isaac Walker
      Note: Original document in possession of a great grandson. Scan on file.
      Repository:
      Note: Bill Walker
      Media: Official Document
      Text: 5 foot 10, dark hair and complexion, blue eyes
    19. Title: Record of descendants of Edward Walker, Revolutionary soldier of North Carolina and Tennessee
      Author: Burns, Annie Walker
      Publication: Frankfort, Kentucky: published privately, 1929
      Note: Transcriptions of family letters and other documents. The book is divided into two sections and pagination restarts; all references here are to the second section. Mrs. Burns collected information specifically to join historical societies and did not compile a more traditional family history book. Still, there are many letters from family members living at that time that provide valuable information. However, the letters are not even chronologically shown, and some of them clearly reflect information learned during the exchange of letters instead of knowledge held previously. Very careful analysis and detailed prior knowledge of the family relationships is necessary to extract appropriate evidence. For instance, one must carefully separate family tradition from personal knowledge of people they would have known well. A careful reading of the letters and attention to timelines does tend to indicate who knew who and who would have most definitely been in a position to know exact family relationships, especially among living people. Some evidence is extremely invaluable. For instance, although other evidence exists, the letters from Mary (Walker) Lewis, combined with those who knew her personally and her family relationship, provide one of the clearest indicators connecting Edward Sr.'s sons Edward and Joseph together as brothers. Likewise, the letters from Elisabeth (Walker) Click and Melbourn Green Walker and the clear evidence of who knew them and their relationships to the family tie Jacob, Henry, John Gilmore, and the other sons and daughters of Edward, Jr., together quite well with strong evidence. Not all evidence is as strong. In short, the book contains valuable source material, but very close scrutiny is required to determine which portions of it constitute source material.
      Repository:
      Note: Daughters of the American Revolution Library, Washington, DC
      Media: Book
      Page: 54
      Text: letter from Minerva Jane Walker to Laura (Walker) Wood, undated and unsigned but clearly 1929, lists each of the children and marriages again; see Minerva's notes for details
    20. Title: Old Time Tazewell
      Author: Hansard, Mary A.
      Publication: Kingsport, Tennessee: Kingsport Press, Inc., 1979
      Note: Written in the 1890s, this book contains sketches of a number of families based on the memories of the author. Her memory is usually quite good. The book is widely available in a number of libraries and for purchase. The dates of the various articles appear to vary, but since the author died in 1899, 1899 can easily be used as a date before which someone died if listed in the book as having died. RAW has a copy.
      Repository:
      Note: Library of Congress
      Media: Book
      Page: 205
      Text: "Isaac Walker's wife was Miss Haynes of Union County. She was the oldest sister of Daniel and William Haynes..."
    21. Title: Tennessee State Marriages, 1765-2002
      Publication: Ancestry.com, Provo, Utah, 2007
      Note: Not complete but good amount of data including scans of the original marriage books.
      Repository:
      Media: Official Document
      Text: Isaac Walker to Polly Haynes, issued 15 January 1848 in Grainger COunty, performed 20 January 1848 by Anderson Acuff, M.G.

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