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  • ID: I02189
  • Name: Richard (2) GOTT 1 2 3 4 4 5 6
  • Sex: M
  • Birth: 1652 in Anne Arundel County, MD 7
  • Birth: AFT. 1650 in Anne Arundel County, MD 2 8
  • Death: ABT. 16 APR 1715 in Herring Creek Hundred, Anne Arundel County, MD 9 8
  • Event: Will Written 1713 10
  • Note:
    Like his Father before him, Richard Gott was a tobacco planter all his life. He was an illiterate man having placed his mark at the bottom of his will. He is not known to have held any civilian or military positions. He was summoned to an inquisition on April 4, 1679 by the Court of Chancery of Maryland as one of "twelve Good and Lawfull men of the county" - the other eleven read like a who's who of the landowning planters in The Great Swamp. (See Archives of Maryland, Liber 1, page 268 located at the Maryland State Archives). He served on a grand jury March Court 1702/3 and again on 14 March 1710 as well as jury duty 13 August 1703 Court. In the community, his mark "R" appears from time to time as a witness on wills, as an appraiser of inventories, a surety on bonds for neighbors' estates and a widening circle of kinfolk. (see Anne Arundel Court Records, March 1702/3 p 41; March 1710 p 115; August 1703, p 232. Maryland State Archives).

    In a tobacco economy that was frequently more famine than feast, he died having either sold or mortgaged most of his substantial inheritance including most of "Ram Gott Swamp" plantation and the personalty it contained. Without a second occupation, such as merchant, woodworker, public patronage job, et cetera, to supplement his income, and sometimes even with a lucrative secondary resource, tobacco farmers who relied on the labor of their family and more and more indentured servants to increase their income, found planting a difficult livelihood during this time. (Richard Gott's Brother-in-Law, Robert Franklin, Sr. in addition to being a planter, was also a merchant and held the lucrative High Sheriff's office of Anne Arundel County from 1678/79 until his death in 1682. He died with an estate overpaid 50,000 pounds of tobacco, i.e. insufficient to meet charges against his estate. No double part of his 814 acres of land had to be sold to meet these debts. (The Dictionary, Vol 1, page 328). Depressed prices for a commodity or cash crop such as tobacco influenced by factors beyond a planter's control including weather, wars and depressions abroad, and public fashion or demand wreaked havoc on profits and capital building for many planters whom Richard Gott appears to have been one. By the 1680s indentured servants from England stopped coming to the Chesapeake in large numbers, and middling planters often made no profits in the decades between 1680 and 1720. By 1700, slaves produced much of the tobacco, but to purchase a slave cost a lot of money. The two slaves, "Moll" and "James" in Richard Gott's inventory were appraised at 25 pounds....this represented well over half the value of his entire personal property, and they had been given to him B the 1702 will of his brother-in-law, John Willoughby. (see Earle's "All Hallow's" pp 14-37; Allan Kulikoff, "Tobacco and Slaves" (Chapel Hill and London: The University of North Carolina Press, 1986), pp 38-44" also note Dallam's St. James' Parish).

    Richard Gott's difficulties at "Ram Gott Swamp" plantation began even before he came into full possession and control of his inheritance. On 16 April, 1670, at a Provincial Court held at the Capital of St. Mary's City, his step-Father, Henry Hooper, won a lawsuit with substantial damages and costs against three members of the politically and economically elite planters of the county, namely William Burgess, Thomas Taylor and Samuel Chew. Two other involved were the equally prominent Ewen Brothers, Richard and John, the latter then the husband of Richard's sister. Sarah Gott. It seems that on 19 November 1666, these men "by force and arms" came to Richard Gott's house "in a Menacing Manner...by Pretence and Colour of an order of Court to Impower them to Come here and to require and Account of the Estate of the said Richard Gott. (1)" Hooper, having married Richard Gott's widow, held Letters of Administration appointing him Administrator of the goods and chattels of the estate, dated 1 February 1662, and may have been the a appointed legal guardian of young Richard though no such record exists. Hooper, thereupon, refused unless these men showed him their commission. They then ordered "John Ewen to take out the Possession of the said Henry the said estate which by their increase was come to the number of Sixty head of Cattle." Hooper claimed he was damaged to the tune of fifty thousand pounds of tobacco, a very large sum. The jurors agreed with him, and Charles Calvert, Esquire, Chief Justice, and the Associate Justices, awarded Hooper forty five thousand, nine hundred and fifty pounds of tobacco in this suit of trespass and violation of the Act of Magna Carta. The Anne Arundel County Sheriff was ordered to remove this amount from the "Goods and Chattels Lands and Tenemts.of the defendants. It is not known when young Richard's cattle were returned to him or in what number, or other vicissitudes which may have fallen on his estate by the administration of his step-Father." (Archives of Maryland LVII pp 543-544, 577-574, Maryland State Archives, A of M, XXXIV, pp 676-677, Maryland State Archives.)

    The first sale of a 200 acre tract of "Ram Gott Swamp" plantation occurred in March 1685. Richard and wife Hannah for fifteen thousand pounds of tobacco, made the sale to Samuel Reniger, who renamed it on the new owner's survey "Bersheba". It included "all woods, profits, commodit....appurtenances." (ref: Anne Arundel Land Records, WH #4/190-194, 1685, Maryland State Archives.)

    On 1 August 1698, Richard sold 100 more acres to his father-in-law, Anthony Holland, which became Holland's home plantation for "a valuable consideration". (ref Anne Arundel Land Records, IB#2/226-228, 1714, Maryland State Archives). One 11 January 1702, Samuel Harrison, another neighboring planter purchased 33 acres including "dwelling houses, outhouses, tobacco houses garden barnes stable orchards pasture Meadows fences and Inclusures...." for 24 pounds sterling. (ref: Anne Arundel Land Records, WT#2/69-70, 1702, Maryland State Archives.)
    The, on 7 November 1705, as tobacco prices continued to falter, Richard sold 100 more acres with appurtenances of Ram Gott Swamp to neighbor Robert Lockwood for 60 pounds sterling. Elizabeth Gott "out of the hearing of her said husband...acknowledged her Right of Dower to be the Right of the said Lockwood." (ref: Anne Arundel Land Records, WT#2/658-661, 1705, Maryland State Archives.)
    However, problems continued and on 29 March 1706, Richard and Elizabeth mortgaged to "John Hyde of the City of Lond in ye Kingdom of England merchant" in consideration of "sixty-two pounds fourteen Hil and eight pence as follows: "all the remaining part of a tract of land, the whole originally laid out for six hundred acres for and in the name of Richard Gott, Father to the said Richard, party to these presents, out of which has been sold about three hundred and forty. The said remaining part hereby conveyed is but two hundred and sixty acres, including all appurtenances.

    Richard Gott was required to pay John Hyde before 29 March 1707, the above amount plus on year's legal interest for the loan. Additionally, Richard offered as security the following: two cows, two two-year old heifers, four yearlings, one horse called Ranter and one mare called Jenny. By 25 June, 1706, Richard paid Hyde 10 pounds on the mortgage and presumably the full amount later to avoid default and sale. (ref: Anne Arundel Land Records WT #2/373-376, 1706, Maryland State Archives.)
    By September 7 1708, Richard and Elizabeth sold Robert Lockwood 40 more acres with appurtenances for 8 pounds. (Anne Arundel Land Records WT#2/663-666,1708, Maryland State Archives.). The final sale recorded on 16 February 1709 was to Henry Attwood, carpenter, of 52 acres called the "Carpenter's Yard," a part of "Ram Gott Swamp", valued at 41 pounds sterling. (ref: Anne Arundel Land Records PK/174-177, 1709, Maryland State Archives.)

    As often happened in the early highly inaccurate land surveys, the original acreage of "Ram Gott Swamp" of 600 acres in the patent was considerable short of the true acreage. Anne Arundel Number 5, Volume 15 Rent Foll for Herring Creek Hundred lands patented to 1743 and sold up to 1737, noted that Ram Gott Swamp was "133 A." over and above the survey." It is believed that Richard Gott still possessed about 105 acres at the time of his death." (Ref: Earle's "All Hallow's", Chapter 7.)

    Richard Gott (2) made his will on 28 December 1713 (1717?) and it was submitted for probate on 7 April 1715. He appointed his son-in-law, John Chesire, his whole and sole executory. John Chesire, however, relinquished his right immediately to Richard's widow, Elizabeth Gott, who posted her Administration Bond in the sume of 200 pounds sterling, with John Norris and son Richard Gott, here sureties. (Ref: Wills, 1715, 14/33-34, Maryland State Archives.)

    Richard Gott (2) left his wife "ye third part of my reall and personall Estate for and during her natural life." He bequeathed his eldest sone, Richard, "who is abt. 23 years of age, my new curb bridle and headstall." To second son, Robert, "who is above 20 years of to be free for himself my best pair of woollen Britches, my ffrench ffull Shoose almost new and yearn stockins." To third son, Anthony, aged eighteen and upwards, "all that part of Land formerly sold to my father in Law, Antho: Holland which Land came again to me by ye right on my wife according to ye derive sd. Antho: Holland and I allow my sd. son Anthony to Enjoy ye same to be free at twenty years old."

    In an indenture on 19 March 1714/15, Elizabeth Gott, "widow" with her half-brothers, Jacob and Capell Holland, and her half-sister, Susanna Holland, each sold to her half-brother, Thomas Holland, their shares of Anthony Holland's 100 acre home plantation of "Ram Gott Swamp" which Holland had purchased from Richard gott on 1 August 1698. for her share of the land, Elizabeth Gott received 12 pounds sterling. Thus, despite Richard Gott's will and provision for third son, Anthony, there was no land for him to enjoy. It is not known whether or not his mother turned over the 12 pounds to him in lieu thereof.

    Fourth son, Matthew Gott "aged between 10 and 17 years" received "a Cow Yearling and her increase to be kept on my Plantation for his use till he arrive at twenty years of age at wch time he is free and shall have them." Fifth son, John Gott, "aged about 13 years ye one half of ye Plantation whereon I now dwell excepting ye half of my wife's thirds sch. he shall not enjoy 'till after her Decease and he is to be free and enjoy ye same at twenty years of age."

    Richard Gott gave his "sixth son" Saml. aged seven years ye seventh day of March next ensuring ye date hereof" the other half of the home plantation. If either John or Robert should die before reaching the age of twenty-one or without issue, Richard left John's part to sone Matthew and Samuel's part to son Robert.

    To the youngest and "seventh sone Capell Gott aged four years ye 27th of September last....ye Negro Girle named Moll as ye same as bequeathed by my Brother in Law, Jno. Willoughley...." To daughter, Sarah Gott, near nine year old "ye Negro Boy named James" also bequeathed him by John Willoughby. She was to have the slave when she became sixteen years of age or on the day of marriage whichever happened first. In case either Capel or Sarah died, Robert was to have Moll and Anthony, James.

    The inventory of Richard's estate was made on 13 April 1715 and amounted to 82.15.0 sterling, over half being the value of the two slaves. There were three cows, three heifers, one small bull, thirteen barrows, four sows, twenty-three pigs and three old mares. Two old Feather beds and two old flock beds were valued at 7 pounds, eight barrels of Indian corn worth 3.4 pounds and that was just about it except pt for three iron pots, a parcel of earthen ware and four pewter dishes. (Testamentary Papers, 1714-1718. Box 3, folder 4, Maryland State Archives.)

    The account of the Thomas Woodfield and Elizabeth, his wife, executors of Richard Gott's will was submitted on 6 April 1716 and showed disbursements in the amount of 61.13.3.1/2 pounds. After Elizabeth Woodfield's death in August 1718, and the appointment of her eldest son, Richard Gott, as administrator de bonis non, certain irregularities in Woodfield's account were brought to the attention of the Prerogative Court for the Probate of Wills by Richard (3) Gott. (Testamentary Papers, 1714-1718, Box 23, Folder 4, Maryland State Archives). As an example, the funeral charges listed by Woodfield of three pounds were wholly disallowed because the costs of the funeral were at the charge of "ye Relations and Charritable Neighbours". There were other items disallowed or amounts altered, so that a final disbursement came to 45.8.8 instead of 61.13.3.1/2 pounds leaving a remainder of 37.6.4 pounds to be divided, With the widow's thirds to widower Woodfield and and the rest to the "orphans". Altogether, the litigation dragged the final settlement of the estate out until the first Friday in September 1718 and even afterwards in Prerogative Court at Annapolis. What was left of "Ram Gott Swamp" plantation ultimately became solely son John's, with Robert selling him his half-share after Samuel's early death. (ref: Chancery Papers #3755, 12 June 1815 Maryland State Archives, traces the final owners of that part of "Ram Gott Swamp" plantation that remained in the hands of the descendants.)

    Richard Gott (2) was one of two children, both quite small when the father died. Their mother afterward married Henry Hooper, and this marriage appears to have caused considerable trouble to Richard Gott (2), who was born in Anne Arundel County in 1652. The will of his father was dated November 28, 1660. Filed for probate February 20, 1662-63. In this will he named his wife, Susan, executrix and residuary legatee of the estate with use of the plantation at her volition. This plantation was to become the property of the only son, Richard Gott (2), when he became seventeen years of age. The plantation was located on Herring Creek. The only daughter, Susan, was bequeathed person property. The records show that on February 20, 1662-63, Henry Hooper, who had in the meantime married the widow of Richard Gott (1), demanded letter of administration upon this estate. Neighbors took a hand in the matter, and through their efforts the estate seems to have been kept from Hooper and passed into the hands of the son and heir at the stipulated time. This same Richard Gott (2) was a beneficiary of the estate of William Collier of Anne Arundel County, MD, whose will was dated April 8, 1676, and probated June 10, 1676. He received personal property, the land being willed to the relatives of Collier. The will of Richard Gott (2) is of record, bearing the date December 28, 1713. He calls himself a planter and gives his age as sixty-one years. The will names his father-in-law, Anthony Holland; his wife, Elizabeth Holland Gott; nine children and a son-in-law, John Chesire. The children were named as follows: Mrs. John Cheshire, Mrs. Susanna Hill, Richard Gott (3), age about 23 years; Robert, 20 years; Anthony, 18, who inherited the Anthony Holland farm; Matthew, 16 years; John, 13, Samuel, 7; Capel, four years; and Sarah, nine years.

    Richard Gott (2) was a son-in-law of Anthony and Isabel (Parsons) Holland, whose daughter, Elizabeth (or Eliza) he married. The will of Anthony Holland was probated August 2, 1703, in Anne Arundel County. After his death, his widow married Benjamin Capell, an old family friend. His will, proved on August 20, 1711, mentions Capell Gott. The will of Isabel Parsons Gott Capell bears date of September 10, 1717. She was a daughter of Thomas Parsons a pioneer in Maryland, whose will was filed for probate May 31, 1684. Her first husband was a son of Captain William Holland, one of the first vestrymen of St. James Parish, Anne Arundel Family.




    Father: Richard (1) GOTT b: 17 JAN 1617/18 in Skipton, Yorkshire, England
    Mother: Susan GORDON

    Marriage 1 Hannah (Alice?) PRATT
    • Married: ABT. 1686 11 8
    Children
    1. Has No Children Hannah (2) GOTT b: 29 JUN 1686 in Anne Arundel County, MD
    2. Has No Children Susanna GOTT b: 29 JUN 1688 in Anne Arundel County, MD

    Marriage 2 Elizabeth HOLLAND b: ABT. 1673
    • Married: ABT. 1691 2
    Children
    1. Has Children Richard (3) GOTT b: 2 MAY 1692 in Anne Arundel County, MD
    2. Has No Children Robert GOTT b: 16 MAY 1693 in Anne Arundel County, MD
    3. Has Children Anthony GOTT b: 15 SEP 1694 in Ref: Colonial Families of the United States of America, Vol. 3
    4. Has No Children Matthew GOTT b: 31 JUL 1697 in Anne Arundel County, MD
    5. Has No Children John GOTT b: ABT. 1700 in Anne Arundel County, MD
    6. Has No Children Sarah GOTT b: 1706 in Anne Arundel County, MD
    7. Has No Children Samuel GOTT b: 7 MAR 1706/07 in Anne Arundel County, MD
    8. Has No Children Cappel GOTT b: 27 SEP 1709 in Anne Arundel County, MD

    Sources:
    1. Title: Will of Thomas Pratt
      Repository:
      Media: Civil Registry
      Page: 396
    2. Title: Richard Gott, Immigrant, and Six Generations of Descendants in Anne Arundel and Montgomer Counties, Maryland
      Author: Ernest C. Allnutt, Jr.
      Publication: Maryland Genealogical Society Bulletin, Vol 33, No 2 (1991)
      Note: Author Ernest C. Allnutt, Jr., 302 E. Joppa Road, Apartment 1710, Towson, MD 21286. Author is currently in his 80s and had not done any new research in the last 15 years. Currently all of Mr. Allnutt's research is being held by the Montgomery County Historical Society, Rockville, MD. It has been indexed and is available to any researcher.
      Note: Excellent, well-cited
      Repository:
      Note: In possession of Patryka Tachick, P.O. Box 573, Sandia Park, NM 87047
      Media: Manuscript
      Page: 254
    3. Title: Maryland: Carroll and Anne Arundel Counties Wills
      Repository:
      Media: Book
    4. Title: Maryland Calendar of Wills, Volume 4, page 27, Will of Richard (2) Gott
      Text: Will of Richard (2) Gott
    5. Title: The Callaway Family of Virginia, and some Kentucky Descendants
      Author: compiled by Mrs. A. E. Hart, a descendant
      Publication: Published by Mrs. A. E. Hart, 1928
      Note: Microreproduction of typescript (281 pages) written by a descendant of the Callaway Family of Virginia.
      Note: some disputed material, generally acurate, list of reference materials for this book is available.
      Repository:
      Note: Book is available on microfilm from the Church of Latter Day Saints, Family History Center; copy in the possession of Pat Tachick, P.O. Box 573, Sandia Park, NM 87047
      Media: Book
      Page: 164
      Text: Richard Gott (2) will dated 1713 and Eliza Holland.
    6. Title: Maryland Calendar of Wills
      Publication: Volume 1
      Repository:
      Media: Official Document
      Text: Maryland Calendar of Wills: Volume 1

      ='*'>Henry Hooper, demanded letters of administration upon this estate on 20th Feb., 1862-63, having married the widow.Gott, Richard, Herring Creek,A. A. Co.,

      Maryland Calendar of Wills: Volume 1

      28th Nov., 1660;

      Maryland Calendar of Wills: Volume 1



      Maryland Calendar of Wills: Volume 1

      20th Feb., 1662-3.

      Maryland Calendar of Wills: Volume 1

      To dau. Susan Gott, personalty.

      Maryland Calendar of Wills: Volume 1

      To son Richard, plantation at Herring Ck. at 17 yrs. of age.

      Maryland Calendar of Wills: Volume 1

      Wife Susan, execx. and residuary legatee of estate and use of plantation at her volition.

      Maryland Calendar of Wills: Volume 1

      Test: Edward Parrish, Jeffry Flambert. 1. 171.

      Maryland Calendar of Wills: Volume 1
      page 24
    7. Title: The Callaway Family of Virginia, and some Kentucky Descendants
      Author: compiled by Mrs. A. E. Hart, a descendant
      Publication: Published by Mrs. A. E. Hart, 1928
      Note: Microreproduction of typescript (281 pages) written by a descendant of the Callaway Family of Virginia.
      Note: some disputed material, generally acurate, list of reference materials for this book is available.
      Repository:
      Note: Book is available on microfilm from the Church of Latter Day Saints, Family History Center; copy in the possession of Pat Tachick, P.O. Box 573, Sandia Park, NM 87047
      Media: Book
      Page: 162
    8. Title: Pat Tachick.FTW
      Repository:
      Media: Other
      Text: Date of Import: Oct 6, 1999
    9. Title: Richard Gott, Immigrant, and Six Generations of Descendants in Anne Arundel and Montgomer Counties, Maryland
      Author: Ernest C. Allnutt, Jr.
      Publication: Maryland Genealogical Society Bulletin, Vol 33, No 2 (1991)
      Note: Author Ernest C. Allnutt, Jr., 302 E. Joppa Road, Apartment 1710, Towson, MD 21286. Author is currently in his 80s and had not done any new research in the last 15 years. Currently all of Mr. Allnutt's research is being held by the Montgomery County Historical Society, Rockville, MD. It has been indexed and is available to any researcher.
      Note: Excellent, well-cited
      Repository:
      Note: In possession of Patryka Tachick, P.O. Box 573, Sandia Park, NM 87047
      Media: Manuscript
    10. Title: The Callaway Family of Virginia, and some Kentucky Descendants
      Author: compiled by Mrs. A. E. Hart, a descendant
      Publication: Published by Mrs. A. E. Hart, 1928
      Note: Microreproduction of typescript (281 pages) written by a descendant of the Callaway Family of Virginia.
      Note: some disputed material, generally acurate, list of reference materials for this book is available.
      Repository:
      Note: Book is available on microfilm from the Church of Latter Day Saints, Family History Center; copy in the possession of Pat Tachick, P.O. Box 573, Sandia Park, NM 87047
      Media: Book
      Page: 164
      Text: Richard Gott (2) will dated 1713 and Eliza Holland
    11. Title: Richard Gott, Immigrant, and Richard Gott, Six Generations of Descendants in Anne Arundel and Montgomer Counties, Maryland
      Author: Ernest C. Allnutt, Jr.
      Repository:
      Media: Book

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