The Olney Connection

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  • ID: I28
  • Name: Thomas OLNEY
  • Surname: Olney
  • Given Name: Thomas
  • Sex: M
  • Birth: 6 Jun 1600 in St. Albans, Hertferd, Hertfordshire, England
  • Death: 17 Oct 1682 in Providence, Providence, Rhode Island, USA
  • Burial: Providence, Rhode Island, USA
  • Ancestral File #: 3Q7Z-K8
  • _UID: B6D09073F9905448BBBD37A51C1105DD1103
  • Note:
    Thomas Olney was born June 6, 1600 in St. Albans Abbey, St. Albans, Hertford, England and died June 16, 1682 in Providence, Rhode Island. He was the son of Thomas Olney (1574-1630) and Mary Small (1576-c.1630) of Hertford, Hertfordshire, England. He was married in 1598 in Hertford, England. Thomas Olney is listed in the ┘SLords, Knights and Gentlemen of Hertfordshire.┘T He married Mary Ashton on September 16, 1629 in St. Albans Abbey, Hertford, England, daughter of James Ashton and Alice Honeychurch, daughter of Reverend Roger Honeychurch, Vicar of Mildreth, Diocese of Ely and was born 1560 in Aveton, Gifford, Devon, England. She was born August 25, 1605 in St. Albans Abbey, Hertford, England and died about 1659 in Providence, Rhode Island.

    Notes for Thomas Olney: One of the founders of Providence, Rhode Island. Thomas Olney was born in St. Albans, Hertford, England which city formed a part of St. Alban Parish. It was the seat of one of the most ancient monasteries and long celebrated in English history as the center of spiritual influence. He received a "Permit to Emigrate┘T to New England" April 2, 1635 and came to Salem, Massachusetts on the ship ┘SPlanter.┘T He was appointed surveyor in January 1636, and granted 40 acres of land at Jeffrey Creek, now known as Manchester, near Salem. He was made freeman the same year and early associated with Roger Williams. With a number of others, he was excluded from the colony. They formed a new settlement at the head of Naragansett Bay; which they named ┘SProvidence┘T in grateful remembrance of their deliverance from their enemies. They thus became the "Original 13 Proprietors of Providence" having purchased their rights from the Indians. In July 1639, he and his wife and their companions were excluded from the church at Salem, "because they wholly refused to hear the church, denying it, and were re-baptized." His prominence in the Colony is shown by the various duties he was called to perform: Reference: ┘SA Genealogy of the Descendants of Thomas Olney an Orginal Proprietor of Providence, Rhode Island who came from England in 1635┘T by James H. Olney of Providence, Rhode Island 1889.

    In 1638, he was chosen the first Treasurer.
    In 1647, was chosen to form a town government.
    In 1648, was chosen assistant for Providence and held the office continuously until 1663.
    In 1665 with Roger Williams and Thomas Harris, he was chosen a Judge of the Justices Court.
    In 1656 was chosen to treat with Massachusetts Bay about the Pawtuxet lands.
    In 1663, the name appears among the grantees of the Royal Charter of Charles II.

    He was one of the founders of the First Baptist Church in Providence, and at one time acted as pastor. He was the leader of a schism in the church upon the question of "laying on of hands" about 1652-1654.

    He was evidently a man of stern and decided opinion, who did not hesitate to advance his views among his neighbors. In his occupation as Surveyor, it is said, "as he entered upon the surrounding lands with his field book, chain, and compass, and mystic words, with the peculiar dignity of official characters of that day, he may well have inspired the Indians with profound awe, and led them to feel that no Indian could henceforth dwell upon that part of their tribal property again."

    Reference: ┘SA Genealogy of the Descendants of Thomas Olney an Original Proprietor of Providence, Rhode Island, Who Came From England in 1635┘T by James H. Olney 1889

    Children of Thomas Olney and Marie (Mary) Ashton

    1. Thomas Olney born January 6, 1631/32 in St. Albans, Hertford, England, died on June 11, 1722 in Providence, Rhode Island, married Elizabeth Marsh on July 3, 1660

    2. Epenetus Olney born February 14, 1633/34 in St. Albans, Hertford, England, died on June 3, 1698 in Providence, Rhode Island, married Mary Whipple on March 9, 1666

    3. Nebediah Olney born June 27, 1637 in Salem, Massachusetts, died on July 7, 1659

    4. Stephen Olney born 1639/40 in Providence, Rhode Island, died 1689 in Providence, Rhode Island

    5. James Olney born 1641/42 in Providence, Rhode Island, died about October 17, 1676 in Providence, Rhode Island

    6. Mary Olney born 1643 in Providence, Rhode Island, died after 1700, married John Whipple, Jr. on December 4, 1773

    7. Lydia Olney born 1644 in Providence, Rhode Island, died September 9, 1724 in Providence, Rhode Island, married Joseph Williams on November 26, 1669.
    -----------------------------
    American Genealogist, Vol. 20, Number 4, April 1944, page 228:
    'Thomas Olney. His wife was not Marie Small but Mary Ashton; their marriage was recorded in the register of St. Albans Abbey, Herts, on 16 Sep 1629. She was baptized there on 25 Aug 1605, the daughter of James Ashton who was buried on 27 May 1651.'
    =
    Complete Book of Emigrants 1607-1640' Peter W. Coldham, p.128 22
    Mar-11 Apr 1635; The following passangers, having taken the oaths, are to be embarked in the 'Planter', Mr. Nicholas Travice, bound from London to New England.; 'With certificate from St. Albans parish, Herts.; Thomas Olney, shoemaker 35, Marie Olney 30, Thomas Olney 3, Epenetus Olney 1.
    =
    'Passengers to America - Founders of New England' by M. Tepper p16-17
    2 Aprilis 1635 Theis vnder written names are to be transported to New England imbarqued in the Planter Nic: Trarice Mr bound thither the p'ties have brought Certificate from the Minister of St Albons (St. Albans) in Hertfordshire, and Attestacon from the Justices of peace according to the Lords Order. Tho: Olney Shoemaker 35, Marie Olney 30, Tho Olney 3, Etenetus --
    =
    BRYANT, Thomas, Descendants of
    Descendants of Thomas Bryant of Chester County, Pennsylvania, narrative history

    Page 221
    THOMAS OLNEY- was born in Hertfordshire, Eng. in 1600, and died in Providence, R.I. in 1682. He arrived in Boston, Mass. 7 June 1635 on the "Planter" from London, and first settled at Salem, Mass., where he was appointed surveyor and made a freeman in 1636. Since he was in sympathy and supported the views of Roger Williams, he was excluded from the colony 12 Mar. 1638, and became one of the 13 original proprietors of R.I. He held many important offices in R.I.: Treasurer in 1638; 1647 commissioner to form a town government; in 1648 chosen assistant for the Province holding the position almost continuously until 1663. He was a judge of Justice Court; his name appears on the charter from Charles II, and he was one of the founders of the Baptist Church in Providence.

    When he arrived in Boston he was accompanied by his wife, Marie Small, born 1605, who died before 1679, and children Thomas, Jr., age 3, and Epenetus, age 1. They had in America other children: Nebediah, Stephen, James, Mary and Lydia. (*Some sources give the wife of Thomas Olney as Marie Ashton.)

    Thomas2 Olney, son of Thomas and Marie Olney, was born in England in 1632 and died at Providence, R.I. 11 June 1722. He was a leading citizen of Providence constantly engaged in public affairs, as assistant, member of the town council 30 years, town clerk. Ordained in 1668, he served as pastor of the First Baptist Church of Providence. He married 3 July 1660 Elizabeth Marsh of Newport, who died before 1722. They had children: Thomas, William, Elizabeth, Anne and Phebe. Elizabeth, born Providence 31 Jan. 1666, died there 2 Nov. 1699; married John Sayles.

    References:
    "Williams & Allied Families" in Americana, Vol. 29;
    Arnold, Vital Records of R.I;
    Austin, Genealogical Dictionary of R.I.;
    Charles Banks, Planters of the Commonwealth (1930, Repr. ed., Baltimore: Genealogy Publ. Co., 1961)
    =
    Thayer, George B. Ancestors of Adelbert P. Thayer, Florine Thayer McCray and Geo. Burton Thayer, children of John W. Thayer and Adaline Burton Hartford, Conn.: Press of the Plimpton Mfg. Co., 1894, 181 pgs. ~http://genealogy.umi.com/image?docID=Genealogy-glh34277200&imageNumber=87

    Page 86
    THOMAS OLNEY, one of the Baptists notified to depart from Massachusetts or appear at the next court, was born at St. Albans, Hertford County, England, in 1600, and came to this country in the ship, "Planter," from London, in 1635. Several years before his departure he married Mary Small [Ashton], of St. Albans, who, besides two sons, came to America with him. He was a shoemaker by trade, and settled at Salem, Mass. In 1638, he and several others were licensed to depart from Mass. Not going immediately they were ordered "to appear at the next court (if they be not gone before) to answer such things as shall be objected." They went. In October of the same year he had settled at Providence, where he was one of the twelve original members of the First Baptist Church, organized in 1639. His former pastor at Salem, in explaining in a letter to a brother pastor the cause of Thomas Olney's expulsion from Salem, wrote: "He wholly refused to hear the church, denying it and all the churches in the Bay to be true churches. The great censure of this, our church, was passed upon him." At Providence he was twice chosen treasurer of the town, was six times appointed commissioner, was nine times chosen assistant, four times
    deputy, and was for eight years a member of the town council. His homestead was south of the present state house, Arsenal Lane now running through it. In 1643 he bought land and settled at Warwick. In 1656 he was chosen judge to try cases where the amount involved did not exceed forty shillings.

    Thomas Olney was a first-class surveyor, and it is said that as he entered upon the surrounding lands with his field book, chain and compass, and mystic words, with the peculiar dignity of official characters of that day, he may well have inspired the Indians with profound awe and led them to feel [Page 86, Page 87] that no Indian could henceforth dwell upon that part of their tribal property again. He died at Providence in 1682. During the early settlement of New England it was claimed in Connecticut that if a man was too bad to live with in Massachusetts, they sent him to Rhode Island, and when they found one a little too good, they sent him to Connecticut, while the remainder of tolerable and average orthodoxy and respectability were allowed to remain undisturbed.

    =
    Correspondence from Mel Olney:
    The Genealogy of Thomas Olney by James Olney gives the wife of Thomas Olney as Marie Small. I have seen other places where his wife is given as Mary Ashton.
    Kay Martin of Oak Grove, Missouri has provided me with the following. "The information on Mary Ashton comes from Austin's Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island - or rather a correction to what was originally in that book. The source is The American Genealogist, Vol. 20, Number 4, April 1944, page 228: "Thomas Olney. His wife was not Marie Small but Mary Ashton; their marriage was recorded in the register of St. Albans Abbey, Herts, on 16 Sep 1629. She was baptized there on 25 Aug 1605, the daughter of James Ashton who was buried on 27 May 1651." Kay continues, "I don't know that that constitutes "proof", but that's what we're going on."
    Another bit of similar information came later on from Mary E. Kelchner of Okeechobee FL. Hers took the form of photo copies of another of issue The American Genealogist, Vol. 10 Number 2. The page numbers are 88, 89 and 90.
    In October I received a letter from Winston J. Olney, of Oceanside, CA. His very interesting letter says, "In 1977 we spent a month driving around England, Scotland and Wales, staying in B & B's all the way. At St. Albans Cathedral, Hertsfordshire I was shown the original hand written entry in a huge book of the marriage of Thomas Olney and Marie Ashton on Sep't 12, 1631."
    In a December letter, Winston enclosed a copy of a letter he had received from the St. Albans Cathedral which says in part, "the correct entry is : MARY ASHTON SEPTEMBER 16th 1629"

    ---------------------------

    Thomas Olney, born in England before 1605 and died Providence, RI between 16 June 1682 when his
    son is called "Jr." and 9 October 1682 when his inventory was taken. He was a shoemaker by trade.
    This is borne out by his inventory, which included considerable numbers of shoemaking materials. He
    was married at St. Albans Abbey, Hertfordshire, England 16 September 1629 (parish register) to
    Marie Ashton, the daughter of James and Alice (____) Ashton. She was baptized in St. Albans on 25
    August 1605 and died probably between 1645 (birth of last known child) and 15th of the 7th month
    1659 when Thomas refers to persons who might claim thirds in a piece of land he was selling.

    Thomas Olney, his wife, Marie and their small sons, Thomas and Epenetus, immigrated to the New
    World on the ship Planter in April, 1635. His age then was called thirty-five, wife Mary thirty, son
    Thomas, three, and son Epenetus, one. He had a certificate from the minister of St. Albans to show
    before taking his departure.

    They settled in Salem, MA where their third son, Nebabiah, was baptized in 1637. In that year there
    were five persons in Thomas Olney's family and he received three acres in the Salem land grant. He
    was also made Freeman that year. Thomas' ability and competence were soon recognized, for by 27
    4mo 1637, he was selected as a member of the jury to hear cases in the Essex Quarterly Courts.

    The family's sojourn in Salem was short; they were among those invited to leave the MA Bay
    Colony, and they moved to Providence, RI in 1638, where Thomas rose to a position of importance in
    the tiny colony. His clear, concise hand is seen on countless deeds and other official documents. From
    the Rhode Island Colony Records, we find a substantial record of his considerable service to the
    community, frequently under the title of respect, "Mr."

    Thomas Olney was a signer of the first compact (undated, but probably between 13 July 1638 and 27
    July 1640) and received a homelot in Providence. He was one of the twelve persons to whom Roger
    Williams deeded land that he had bought of Canonicus and Miantonomi on 8 October 1638. That year
    Thomas Olney was also the first Treasurer for the town of Providence.

    However, Olney is much better known in his role as Court Assistant, Town Councilman and Clerk.
    Thomas was one of the original members of the Baptist church in Providence, but in 1653/4 he and
    some others withdrew from the Six-Principle group under Wickenden's leadership to found a second
    church. Olney became lay pastor for this small congregation until his death in 1682. Thomas Olney
    was made a member of a sub-committee to consider a way of preventing the sale of ammunition to the
    Indians. He was named assistant to the General Court of Tryalls many times between 12th 3rd month
    of 1652 and 1670. Several times he was chosen to be next in line as Assistant or actually Assistant to
    the Governor in Providence. He was Commissioner for Providence 6 March 1655/6, 22 May 1662
    and 4 October 1662. In addition to his duties as Assistant and Commissioner, he was several times
    named a Justice of the Peace and tax collector for Providence.

    Thomas Olney was a major player in the controversy over the boundaries between Rhode Island and
    her sister colonies, Connecticut and Massachusetts. He was chose, with others, to run the northern
    line of the colony and labored long on these questions. On 31 May 1666, Thomas Olney, Sr. was
    fourth on the list of Providence men who swore allegiance to King Charles II. Thomas Olney was
    added to the Town Council to make up the number in 1667.

    As he entered his late sixties, Thomas provided small parcelts for his children, but reserved the bulk
    of their portions for bequests in his will. Thomas wrote his will about three years before his death.



    Be it knowne unto all people by these presents That I Thomas Olney Senior of Providence in the
    Colloney of Rhode Island & providence plantations in New England, being weake of Body, but yet of
    sound & perfect memory, Doe make, ordaine & appoynt this my last will and Testament.

    Item. I doe give & bequeath unto my Son Epenetus Olney my sixty acrs of land which was to me from
    ye towne of Providence upon my owne Right. I doe also give unto my son Epenetus Olney a percell of
    low swampie land lieing on ye north side of Wanasquatucket River, begining at ye Swampe formerly
    Called Wallers Swampe, & so reaching Westward to a deepe place in ye said River called ye deepe
    hole, together with all ye peeces of Marsh, or meadow to ye said land adjoyneing. As also unto said
    son Epenetus Olney I doe give my fifteene acrs of land on the south side of the said
    Wanasquatuckett River, together with all my peeces, or percells of meadow or marsh on ye same
    side ofye River. The which said fifteene acres of land, is three five acre shares, one in my owne
    Right, one in the Right of William Field, & on in ye Right of Thomas James. Also unto my said son
    Epenetus Olney, I doe give & bequeath all the Right of land & Comoning which I bought of John
    Joanes. All which aforementioned lands & meadowes & Every aprt & percell thereof shall be to my
    said son Epenetus Olney his owne true proper Right & lawfull inhiritance for Ever, for him & his
    heirs to use, possesse, Rent out, bargaine, sell, give away or any otherwise despose as he at any time
    shall see cause.

    I doe also give unto my son Epenetus Olney one of my Cowes, & my Smiths vice, & my Bible.

    Item. I Doe give & bequeath unto my son in law John Whipple to posesse dureing his Naturall life,
    my Right in the house lott, or home share of land whereon he now dwelleth, the which formerly
    belonged to John Clawson; The which said two acres, & five acrs of land shall after the decease of
    my said son in law John whipple, Revert and belong unto John whipple the son of my said son in law
    & my Daughter Mary; But in Case my said Cousin John Whipple doe dye before he come to ye age
    of twenty one years, or without Issue, Then shall ye said land belong to ye Eldest sirviveing Daughter
    borne of ye body of my aforsaid Daughter Mary formerly the wife of my said son in loaw John
    whipple.

    Item. I Doe Give, & bequeath unto my son Thomas Olney my dwelling house, with all other my out
    houseing what Ever, together with my house lot or home share of land where on it standeth with all
    the appurtenances thereunto belonging, together with all my other lands of what sort so Ever, both
    upland, meadowes, & marshes, or lands of any other sort not befor desposed of unto my son
    Epenetus Olney, & unto my son in law John Whipple; I say, all sorts of landes & meadow, salt, or
    fresh lieing upont he aforsaid Wanasquatuckett River, or upon Moshausuck River, or leiing & being
    in any other place within ye libertyes of the Towne of Providence aforsaid. As also all landes, Rights,
    claimes, Intrests, Titles or Heriditaments in any other parts, or palce to me belonging together with
    all the aformentioned landes, & houseing & meadowes & Every part, & percell thereof to beunto my
    aforsaid son Thomas Olney To have & to hold both hinselfe, his Heirs, Exsecutors, Administrators &
    Assignes as his, or Either of theire true, proper & lawfull Right and Inhiritance for Ever. And that it
    shall be lawfull for my said son Thomas Olney to posesse, improove, sett to lease, bargaine, Sell,
    Give away, or otherwise despose of, from time to time, or at any time all the said lands, houseing &
    meadowes & Every part & percell thereof as he shall see Cause.

    I doe also Give unto my son Thomas Olney all my Bookes & writeings of what sort so Ever, saveing
    only one bible before desposed of unto my son Epenetus.

    Item. I doe Give & bequeath unto my son in law Joseph Williams all my part in the yoake of oxen
    which is now betweene us. Item. All my Cattell which are not before desposed of, together with all my
    mooveable goods after ye Cost of my buriall is discharged, shall Equally be devided into three parts.
    One part whereof I doe give unto my son Thomas Olney. Another part thereof I doe giveunto my so
    Epenetus Olney. And the other part I doe give unto my daughter Liddea Williams. And I Doe hereby
    make, Ordaine & appoynt my son thoams Olney to be my true & lawfull Exsecutor who shall have all
    my debts, & see to pay all my debts, And to see my Body Descently Buried, And to Execute &
    performe this my will according to ye true meaneing & intent thereof. And I doe desire, & appoynt
    my loveing friends & neighbours Thomas Harris senior, & Joseph Juinkes Senior the overseers of
    this my last Will. And that I doe hereby, all & any former will, or wills at any time by me made the
    same make Null and Voyd & this only to stand in force. In wittnesse of the premises I doe hereunto
    sett my hand & seale the twenty one day of March in the yeare one Thousand Six hundred Seventy
    nine.

    Thomas Olney, senior.

    Thomas Field and Nathaniel Waterman appeared before the Council 17 October 1682 and proved the
    will.



    The Inventarey of ye Estate of Thomas Olney senr: of Providence in ye Colloney of Road Island &
    Providence plantations, Deceased, Taken & Made ye 9th day of October in the yeare 1682.

    Imprimis, In ye Parlor

    weareing apparrill, & 2 hatts 3 [pair] of Stockins & i [pair] of shooes
    4 bedd blanketts
    3 small bedd blanketts
    1 brancht Coverlidd
    2 fringed Coverlidds
    2 old Ruggs
    i feather bedd of Inglish ticken
    i feather bed
    i flock bedd
    3 feather pillowes
    i feather bolster
    i feather bolster
    2 old feather bolsters
    i Teaster bedstud
    i sett of Old Curtains & vallians
    linnen Capps, handkircheirfs & bands
    i shirt
    10 Table napkins
    2 small Table Cloathes
    2 pillow Cases
    3 Coarse towells
    3 Coarse Sheets
    i Sheete
    2 brushes
    i Trunke with a lock upon it
    i Brisse kittle
    i Brasse Kittle patcht
    i Brasse Kittle
    i little Iron Kittle
    i Iron pott
    2 [pair] of pott hookes
    Grid Iron
    i hand Cleaver
    i fryeing pann
    i spitt
    i [pair] of Tongs
    i [pair] of And Irons
    i Trammill, & saw palte turned for a tramill
    i old dripping pann
    i [pair] of old Bellowes
    i Paile & i Tray
    2 old pewter Chamber potts
    i brasse skillett & a Chafeing dish
    old IRon morter & pestle
    i qurt, Glasse bottle, a halfe pint Glasse bottle & a Cann
    i stone Jugg
    i old Case & 3 Square bottles
    Shoomakers tooles, & a hammer
    i Table Napkin
    2 boxes
    2 old joynt Chaires, & a joynt stoole
    i smale Table
    i Great Chaire
    i fourme

    In ye hall chamber

    3 Brasse Candlesticks, one brass Skimmer, & one small brasse Skillett without a frame
    Peuter potts, platters, spoones & Cupps, & a bedd pann, all old
    i dosen of Trenchers
    i Chest
    3 [pair] of sheets
    i [pair] of sheets
    3 Coarse old sheets
    3 pillow Cases
    i shirt
    i [pair] of drawers, a trusse, & one towell
    i Chest with a lock
    i old hoggshead, & one old Barrill

    In ye old bed Roome in ye dwelling house

    2 yards & 3 quarters of Carsey
    10 yardes & a halfe of blanketing
    4 yardes of woolen homeSpun Cloath
    2 yardes & halfe of home made Cloath
    Almost 2 yardes of white full'd Cloath
    i bed blankett
    i old blankett
    i dublett
    i Chest

    In ye shopp

    i Smiths vice
    2 Curriors shaves
    a sett of hoops for Cart wheeles
    Shoomakers lasts
    hempe & ye box it is in

    In ye orchard

    i old Tubb & a barrill

    In ye Cellar

    2 tubbs

    In ye Parlor

    3 Cart boxes, in lince pinn & a washer
    Lead
    hempe teare
    Dry hides in all ye places where they lye, at Tho: Olney junrs: house in ye towne, & what Tho:
    Olney tooke to tann, & what be Else where in out housen formerly belonging to Tho: Olney
    deceased

    At ye Kittchen

    one Bible
    3 old peeces of Bibles in ye Parlor

    Att Tho: Olneys house

    3 Bookes, namely Ainsworths Anotations, A Concordance, & fishers Ashford Dispute
    i Mortizeing Axe
    i fann
    In money, 2 pounds, 14s.
    4 Cowes, in ye deceased Tho: Olneys yard

    This Inventory was made ye yeare & day aforsd by us

    Tho: Olney

    Thomas harris senr

    Thomas Field

    Severall things, which were afterwards thought on,

    In ye shopp, i Hetchell
    In ye Kittchen i Gunn
    2 Axelltree pinnes
    Att Epenetus Oleys house I old broad Axe
    i old Ads
    i Tennant saw
    i wedge
    Att Tho: Olneys house, i wooden bottle
    i old Small drawing knife
    i hand Saw
    i stone hammer, or small Sledge
    i Tennant Saw
    i last knife
    Att Mr Jinks his house, one wooden Bottle
    Att Tho: Olneys house, i Table, old & shattred

    Tho: Olney

    Thomas Harris senr:

    Thomas Field:

    The sum totall of this Inventory amounts to 78 pounds, 9s., 5d. If no mistake be in Casting up.



    References:

    The Ancestry of Emily Jane Angell 1844-1910, Dean Crawford Smith, New England Historic
    Genealogical Society, Boston, MA, 1992, pp. 190 & 437 - 448.

    The Genealogical Dictionary of Rhode Island, John Osborne Austin, Genealogical Pub. Co.,
    Baltimore, MD, 1969, (previously pub. 1887), pp. 352 - 354.

    TAG - The American Genealogist, Vol. 20, No. 4, Additions & Corrections to Austin's
    Genealogical Dictionary of RI, G. Andrews Moriarty, Demorest, GA, April 1944, p. 228.

    Source: A.M. Shotwells Ancestors And Their Families pp 48-49.
    THOMAS OLNEY, 1600-1682, shoemaker, from St. Albans, Hertford Co., England, embarked in ship Planter of London for New England 2 April 1635, aged 35 with wife Mary aged 30, and sons Thomas and Epentus. He was elected Freeman at Salem, Mass., 17 May 1637, and received a grant of land there the same year, but went to Providence in 1638, where he was the Treasurer for the town and again in 1669; was one of the original members of the First Baptist Church (1639) and one of the 39 signers of the agreement for a form of government of the Colony, 27 July 1640, and subsequently held the positions of Assistant Commissioner, Deputy, and Town Council. The Genealogical Dictionary of RI has records of his 7 children, 21 grandchildren, and 60 great-grandchildren. He married Mary Small b. 1605, who died before the date of his will of 21 Maarch 1678-9, proved 17 October 1682, and had:
    (1) Thomas, b. 1632, d. 11 June 1722, m. 3 July 1660 Elizabeth Marsh, who died before 1722.
    (2) Epenetus, b. 1634, d. 3 Jun 1698; m. 9 March 1665-6, Mary Whipple, 1648-1698 + [of John and Sarah].
    (3) Nedabiah, baptised 27 Aug 1637, d. young.
    (4) Stephen, d. 1658+/-;
    (5) James, d. Oct 1676, unmarried;
    (6) Mary, d. 1676+/-, m. 4 Dec 1663, John Whipple, b. 1640, d. 15 Dec 1700 [of John and Sarah];
    (7) Lydia, b. 1645, d. 9 Sept 1724, m. 17 Dec 1669, Joseph Williamss, b. 12 Dec 1648, d. 17 Aug 1724 [of Roger and Mary].

    Thomas and Mary [Small] Olney's daughter Mary, m. John Whipple [of John]and had:
    Elnathan Whipple, who. m. John Rice [of John] and had Barbara Rice, who m. John Langford [of Thomas, Thomas], and had Phoebe Langford, who m. Joseph Greene [of John, James, John, of royal descent] and had Langford Greene, who. m. Abigail Thomas [of George], and had Bathsheba Greene, who m. Jonathan Berry, and had Diana Berry, who m. George Washington Gardner [of John, John, William, George] and had Phebe B. Gardiner, who m. Nathan Shotwell [of Isaac M., Richard, Benjamin, John, John, Abraham], and had Ambrose Milton Shotwell, the compiler of the referenced source above.

    THOMAS OLNEY was born about 1600 in ST ALBANS, HERTFORDSHIRE, ENGLAND. He died in 1682 in PROVIDENCE, , RHODE ISLAND. He has reference number 2816. His will was proved 17 Oct 1682 in Providence,Rhode Island.

    In April 1635 he sailed from London on the ship PLANTER for the New England
    Colony with his wife and two small sons.Hottens,list of Emigrants from England
    show that they were licensed and granted permission to go by the minister of
    St.Albans,Hertfordshire.

    He was a shoemaker by trade and settled first in Salem where he was registered
    as a Freeman,17 May 1637.Up until this time he had not shown any sympathy
    toward the opinions of Roger Williams,for Roger Williams was banished from
    Massachusetts Bay Colony early in 1636 over the question of Freedom of
    Religion.To have the title of Freeman one had to swear allegiance to the
    Established Church which affected Thomas Olney too.

    Sometime between May 1637 and October 1638 he and his family joined Roger
    Williams to set up the new Providence Plantations.He and his family may have
    been among those who accompanied Mrs.Williams and her two infant daughters,Mary
    and Freeborn,when she joined her husband in 1638.

    The proprietorship agreement dated 8 October 1638 listed 13 men,one of whom was
    Thomas Olney.From then on he played an important part in the founding and
    governing of Providence Plantations and Rhode Island.In the index to the Vital
    and Civil Records of Rhode Island references to Thomas Olney,both Sr and Jr,
    take up about five and a half columns of fine type.Records show that on 12
    March 1638 it was ordered that he and others having had license to depart from
    Massachusets were ordered to appear at the next court,if they had not departed,
    to answer such things as shall be objected.

    1 July 1639 he and his wife were alluded to in a letter from Rev.Hugh Peters of
    Salem,to the church at Dorchester,as having had"the great censure passed upon
    them in this our church."He says that they and certain others"wholly refused to
    hear the church,denying it and all the churchs in the Bay to be true churchs,"
    ect.

    An inventory of his possessions at death included three books,Ainsworth's
    Annotations,Concordance and Fisher's Ashford Dispute.

    The Olney Family - The English ancestor of this family was Thomas Olney, born in St.Albans, Hertford County, England, in 1600. He left his native country April 2nd, 1635, was a shoemaker by trade, and came first to Salem, Mass., afterward in about 1637 or 1638 to Providence, and was one of the twelve who had land deeded to them by Roger Williams. He married Mary Small, and died in 1682. His children were: Thomas, Epenetus, Nedabiah, died young; Mary, married John Whipple; Lydia, married Joseph Williams;Stephen and John, both died unmarried. Thomas, son of Thomas, was born in 1632, and died in 1722. He married Elizabeth Marsh, and their children were: Thomas, William, Anne, married John Waterman; Elizabeth and Phebe, both died single. Thomas, son of Thomas, was born in May, 1661, and died March 1st, 1718. His wife was Lydia Barnes; and of their family of eight children, Obadiah was born February 14th, 1710. His son Elisha, who married a Whipple, had eight children, among whom was one Obadiah, who had six children, as follows: Joseph, Daniel, who died single; Mary, died single; Lydia, wife of William G.R. Mowry, of Providence, and two who died in infancy. Joseph, son of Obadiah, was born August 8th, 1814, and married Mary A. Bailey. Their children were: Clara, wife of A.E. Holbrook, Jr., of Providence; Helen G., died in infancy; Anna, (deceased), married Uriah H. Holbrook; George B., Charles P., and Joseph, died July 1st, 1887. He was many years engaged in farming, but for the last 18 years of his life was in the coal business in Providence. George B., son of Joseph, was born March 20th, 1854, married Ella Maria Payne, and has two children: Florence P. and Joseph. He is the senior member of the firm of Olney and Payne Brothers.

    Register Report - OLNEY
    http://homepages.rootsweb.com/~sam/olney.html

    http://www.winthropsociety.org/planter.htm
    http://www.winthropsociety.org/shipndx4.htm
    PRENAME SURNAME AGE PASSAGE ROLL #
    Etenetus Olney . Planter, 1635 34
    Mary Olney 30 Planter, 1635 32
    Thomas Olney 3 Planter, 1635 33
    Thomas Olney 35 Planter, 1635 31

    From: Portrait and biographical record of Kalamazoo, Allegan, and Van Buren Counties, Michigan : containing biographical sketches of prominent and representative citizens, together with biographies of all the governors of the state, and of the presidents of the United States. Author: Anonymous City of Publication: Chicago Publisher: Chapman Bros. Date: 1892

    For the following geneology of the Olney family we are indebted to James H. Olney, of Providence, R.I. From what has been gathered across the seas, it appears that the name has a Saxon origin. It was in existence very early in the ninth century, and was probably derived from the local surroundings of the place where the family lived. By others it is claimed that the first bearing the name was Rogerus, or Richard DeOlney, who came from Normandy with William the Conqueror, in 1066, and after the conquest of England, with a number of others, became permanent occupants of the soil. The name appears in the Doomsday Book, which describes the apportionment of land to the followers of the Conqueror. To some future antiquarian is left the labor of deciding to a certainty the true origin, the family meanwhile being content to be descended from the sturdy stock of old England, whether it be Saxon, Norman, or both.

    The first representative of the family in America was Thomas Olney, who was born in Hertford, Hertfordshire, England, a city that formed part of the parish of St. Albans, the seat of one of the most ancient monasteries and long celebrated in English history as the center of spiritual influence. Of his early life nothing is known. He received a permit to emigrate to New England, April 2, 1635, and came to Salem, Mass., in the ship "Plantar." He was appointed a surveyor in January, 1936, and granted forty acres of land at Jeffery Creek, now known as Manchester, near Salem. During the same year, he was made a freeman and early associated with those who accepted the peculiar views of Roger Williams. With a number of others, he was excluded from the colony March 12, 1638.

    However, prior to that event, Mr. Olney, with others, visited Narragansett Bay, seeking some place where they might live outside the jurisdiction of the Massachusetts Colong and had decided upon the west side of the Seeconk river. Accordingly with eleven others, a new settlement was formed at the head of the bay, whcih they names Providence, in remembrance of their deliverance from their enemies. They thus became the thirteen original propiretors of Providence, having purchased their rights from the Indians in July, 1639. His prominence in the colony is shown by the various duties he was called upon to perform. In 1638, he was chosen the first Treasurer; in 1647, was made Commissioner to form a town government; the following year was appointed Assistant for Providence and held that office almost continuously until 1668. In 1656, with Roger Williams and Thomas Harris, he was chosen Judge of the Justice's Court, and in the ensuing year was appointed to treat with Massachusetts Bay about the Pawtuxet lands. In 1665, his name appears among the grantors of the Royal Charter of Charles II, and in the same year he was chosed Assistant under the new charter.

    Bicknell, Thomas Williams, The history of the state of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations New York: American Historical Society, 1920, 3211 pgs.

    OLNEY FAMILY -- Thomas Olney, immigrant ancestor and progenitor of the Rhode Island Olneys, was born in Hertforshire, England, in 1600, and prior to the time of his emigration to the American Colonies, had resided in the town of St. Albans, where he followed the trade of shoemaker. On April 2, 1635, he embarked in the ship "Plantar" from London for New England, bearing from the minister of St. Albans the certificate of conformity to the Church of England, demanded from all who emigrated to the New World. The records state his age as thirty-five at the time. The Olney coat-of-arms is as follows:

    Arms--Or, three piles in point gules, on a canton argen a mullet sable.
    Grest -- In a ducal coronet or, a phoenix's head in flames proper, holding in the beak a laurel branch vert.

    Thomas Olney was accompanied by his wife and two sons, Thomas and Epenetus. He settled first in Salem, Mass., where he was admited a freeman, May 17, 1637, and in the same year received a grant of land. In January, 1636, he had been appointed a surveyor and been granted forty acres of land a Jeffrey Creek, now known as Manchester, Mass.

    He early became associated with those who accepted the views of Roger Williams, and on March 12, 1638, was banished from the colony with a number of others of the latter's followers. He accompanied Mr. Williams to the new settlement, and on October 8, 1638, was one of the twelve men to whom Roger Williams deeded equal share with himself in the Providence lands. He became on of the "Original Thirteen Proprietors of Providence." In July, 1639, he and his wife and their companions were excluded from the church at Salem, "because", worte Rev. Hugh Peters, of Salem, to the church at Dorchester, "they wholly refused to hear the church, denying it and all the churches in the Bay to be true churches." In 1638 Thomas Olney was treaserer for the town of Providence. In 1639 he was one of the twelve original members of the First Baptist Church. He became on of the most prominent men in the new colony. In 1647 he was one of the commission to form a town governemtn. In 1649-53-54-55-56-64-65-66-67 he held the office of assistant, and in 1656-58-59-61-63-64 was commissioner. On February 19, 1665, he held lot 23 in a division of lands. In 1665-67-70-71 he was deputy to the General Court, and in 1665-66-69-70-71-74-77-81, was a member of the Town Council, again in 1669 filling the office of town treasurer. In 1645, with roger Williams and Thomas Harris, he was chosen a judge of the justice court, and in 1656 was chosen to treat with Massachusetts Bay in the matter of the Pawtucket lands; in 1663 his name appears among the grantees of the Royal Charter of Charles II. He was one of the wealthy men of the colony, and had a large real adn personal estate. His homestead stood on North Main Street. Thomas Olney died at the age of eighty-two years, and was buried in the family graveyard in the rear of his dwelling. In 1631 he was married, in England, to Marie Small, and they were the parents of seven children, among them Epenetus, mentioned below.
    --------------------
    A genealogy of the descendants of Nicholas Harris, M.D.

    OLNEY.
    Arms : Three piles in a base gu. (red) on a canton, ar. (silver) a mullet sa. (black), crest out of a ducal coronet or (gold) an eagle's head in flames of fire, proper, in the mouth of a sprig of vert. Motto: "Silve probate Leon."
    The above is a description of the arms of Roger de Olnie, or Olney, who came from Normandy with William the Conqueror in 1066. His name appears in the Doomsday book, which describes the apportionment of land to the followers of the Conqueror, and is claimed to be the first of the family in England.
    "Thomas Olney, the ancestor of the Olney's in America, had his birthplace in the City of Hertford, Hertfordshire, England, which city formed a part of the Parish of St. Albans. He received a "permit to emigrate to New England," April 2, 1635, in which permit his age was given as thirty-five, his wife Mary thirty, son Thomas three, and son Epenetus one, and came to Salem, Mass., by the ship Planter. He was appointed a surveyor in Jan'y, 1636, and granted forty acres of land at Jeffrey Creek, nowAnown as Manchester, near Salem. He was made a freeman tha'camo year' and early associated with those who accepted the peculiar views of Roger Williams. With a number of others, he was excluded from the Colony March 12, 1638. Accordingly, with eleven others, they formed a new settlement at the head of Narragansett Bay, which they named Providence, in grateful remembrance of their- deliverance from their enemies. They thus became the "Original Thirteen Proprietors of Providence," having purchased their rights from the Indians.
    Thomas Olney's prominence in the colony is shown by the various duties he was called upon to perform. In 1638 he was chosen the first treasurer. In 1647 he was chosen commissioner to form a town government. In 1648 he was chosen Assistant for Providence and held the office almost continuously until 1663. In 1655, with Roger Williams and Thomas Harris, he was chosen a judge of the Justices Court. In 1656 he was chosen to treat with Massachusetts Bay about the Pawtuxet lands. In 1663 his name appears among the grantees of the Royal Charter of Charles II. In the same year he was chosen an Assistant under the new Charter. He was one of the founders of the First Baptist Church in Providence and at one time its acting pastor. He was evidently, a man of stern and decided opinions, and did not hesitate to advance his views among his neighbors.
    Of him, in his occupation as surveyor, it is said, as he entered upon the surrounding lands, with his field book, chain and compass, and mystic words, with the peculiar dignity of official characters of that day, he may well have inspired the Indians with profound awe, and led them to feel that no Indian could henceforth dwell upon that part of their tribal property again. His homestead was located on North Main street, a short distance south of the State House. He was buried in the family ground at the rear of his dwelling. He was the possessor of a large real and personal estate, and occupied one of the better houses in the Providence Plantations." ┘v Olney Genealogy, by James H. Olney.
    He was born in 1600 and m. Sept. 16, 1629,<a) (See note),
    Mary Ashton, (b. Aug. 25, 1605,(b) d 1679, dau. of
    James and Alice ( ) Ashton,1" of St. Alban's Parish,
    England), and died in 1682.
    Children:

    Thomas2, b. in 1632, <d) in England, d. June n, 1722, in Providence.
    Epenetus2, b. . . . 1634,(c) in England, d. June 3, 1698, in Providence.
    Nebediah2, b 1637, baptized in Salem, Mass., June
    27, 1637 and d. soon after July 7, 1659.
    Stephen2, b. 1639-40, d. in 1689.
    James2, b. 164┘v, d. probably Oct. 17, 1676. No issue.
    Mary 2, b. 164┘v, d. in 1676.
    Lydia2, b. 1644-5, d. Sept. 9, 1724.
    Thomas2 Olney, who was three years old when he came from England with his parents, became a leading spirit in the Rhode Island Colony early in life and was constantly engaged in public affairs to the time of his death. He was chosen Assistant during the years 1669, '70, '77 to '79. For thirty years he was a member of the Town Council, and frequently we find his name among the members of the Colonial Assembly. His signature occurs through a long term of years as Town Clerk. He was ordained a minister in 1668 and succeeded the Rev. Gregory Dexter as pastor of the First Baptist church, serving until about the years 1710 to 1715. He severely criticised the methods and teachings of George Fox, a leading Quaker who came from England and resided some years in the Colony, in a document entitled "Ambition Anatomized," the original of which may be seen at the Rhode Island Histori
    cal Society. His house was located at the north end of Providence, at the foot of Stamper's Hill. He was an owner of a very large tract of land, known as Wenscot farm, lying in those parts of Providence now forming a portion of North Providence and Lincoln, considerable of which still remains in possession of his descendants. He was chosen to go to England on business for the Colony, but refused the honor. He was born in 1632, m. Elizabeth Marsh of Newport, R. I., July 3, 1660 and d. June 11, 1722. He had five children: Thomas3, William3, Elizabeth3, Anne3 and Phebe3. Of these children, Anne3 m. John Waterman in 1691 and had eight children. Of these eight children, Phebe4 m. Henry Tibbits and had five children, one of which, Phebe5, m. Nicholas Harris, M. D. (See Harris Genealogy, p. 7.)
    Thomas Olney1 m. Mary Ashton, Sept. 16, 1629.
    Thomas Olney2 m. Elizabeth Marsh, July 3, 1660.
    Anne Olney3 m. John Waterman 1691.
    Phebe Waterman4 m. Henry Tibbits, Nov. 23, 1738.
    Phebe Tibbits5 m. Nicholas Harris, M. D., Feb. 25, 1773.
    Nicholas Brown Harris6, M. D., m. Martha Carmichael, Sept. 6, 1806.

    Note.-Parish Registers of St. Albans Abbey, 1558-1689, transcribed by W. Brigg, 1897, Harpenden, Hert. (<i) Page 148, (6) page 40, (c) page 40, (rf) page 66, (e) page 68.
    ----------
    New England families, genealogical and memorial: a record of the ..., Volume 2 edited by William Richard Cutter

    (I) Thomas Olney, the immigrant ancestor, was born in Hertford, Hertfordshire, England, which city formed a part of the Parish of St. Albans, the seat of one of the most ancient monasteries and long celebrated in
    English history as the center of spiritual influence. He received a "Permit to emigrate to New England," April 2, 1635, and came to Salem, Massachusetts, in the ship "Planter." He was appointed a surveyor in January, 1636, and granted forty acres of land at Jeffrey Creek, now known as Manchester, near Salem. He was made a freeman that same year, and early associated with those who accepted the peculiar views of Roger Williams. With a number of others he was excluded from the colony March 12, 1658. Previous to this, however, in company with Williams, he visited Narragansett Bay while seeking some place where they might live outside the jurisdiction of Massachusetts Colony, and decided upon the west side of the Seekonk river. Accordingly, with eleven others, they formed a new settlement, at the head of the bay, which they called Providence, in grateful remembrance of their deliverance from their enemies. They thus became the "Original Thirteen Proprietors of Providence," having purchased their rights from the Indians. In July, 1639, he and his wife and their companions were excluded from the church at Salem, "because they wholly refused to hear the church, denying it, and were rebaptized." His prominence in the colony is shown by the various services which he was called upon to perform. In 1638 he was chosen the first treasurer; in 1647 ne was chosen commissioner to form a town government; in 1648 he was chosen assistant for Providence, and held the office almost continuously until 1663. In 1665, with Roger Williams and Thomas Harris, he was chosen a judge of the justices court. In 1658 he was chosen to treat with Massachusetts Bay about the Pawtuxet lands. In 1663 his name appears among the grantees of the Royal Charter of Charles II. In the same year he was chosen assistant under the new charter. He was one of the founders of the First Baptist Church in Providence, and at one time was acting pastor, or minister. He was the leader in a schism in the church upon the question of "laying on of hands," about 1652-54. He was evidently a man of stern and decided opinions, who did not hesitate to advance his views among his neighbors. Of him, in his contemplation as a surveyor, it is said, "as he entered upon the surrounding lands with his field book, chain and compass and mystic words, with the peculiar dignity of official characters of that day, he may well have inspired the Indians with profound awe and led them to feel that no Indian could henceforth dwell upon that part of their tribal property again." His homestead was located on North Main street, a short distance south of the

    State House, and what is now known as Arsenal lane led through his land. The place of his burial was in the family ground at the rear of his dwellings. All that remained of the earlier members of the family was probably removed to the burial ground on Olney street, whence a second removal took place to make room for the church now occupying the spot. He was the possessor of a large real and personal estate, and occupied one of the better houses in the Plantations. He was born in the year 1600, married in 1631 to Marie Small, and died in 1682. Children: Thomas, mentioned below; Epenetus, born 1634, in England ; Nedebiah, 1637; Stephen, 1639-40; James, died October 17, 1676; Mary, born 164┘v; Lydia, 1644.

    -------------------------
    New England families, genealogical and memorial: a record of the ..., Volume 1 edited by William Richard Cutter

    The family of Olney is one of OLNEY the oldest in Rhode Island, and
    has been continuously identified with the history of the state from its earliest period down to the present time. The origin in England is traced to the time of the Conquest, and it appears in the Domesday Book. In America those bearing it have been found in positions of responsibility in every generation. The early colonists transplanted to these shores a civilization which for high moral and intellectual tone and sterling virtues, has never been surpassed. To this day New England conscience and virtues are regarded as models throughout the country, no less than by the descendants of the Pilgrim Fathers themselves. Inheriting in generous measure the qualities which made their forebears strong and irreproachable, the present day representatives have fostered the traditions and lived up to the standards of right living established by an honored race. To say that they have improved on the models would be presumption. But the days of stern necessity having passed, the social arts have softened rugged outlines and added grace to dignity, until now no higher compliment could be paid to a son of New England than to call him a typical son of that region.
    (I) Thomas Olney, a native of St. Albans, Hertfordshire, England, born 1600, received a royal permit to colonize in New England in 1635, and sailed April 2, 1635 from London in the ship "Planter" to Massachusetts. He bore a certificate from the minister at St. Albans, and received a grant of land at Salem in 1637, being made a freeman in Salem the same year. The records show that he had five in his family December 25 of that year. He early associated himself with those entertaining the religious views of Roger Williams, hence was excluded from the Massachusetts colony, March 12, 1638. Prior to this he had accompanied Roger Williams to the shores of Narragansett Bay, and he became one of the twelve original settlers on the west side of the Seekonk river, at the head of the bay, founding what is now the beautiful city of Providence, so named in grateful remembrance of their delivery from oppression. He located in Providence, October 8, 1638, and was one of the twelve to receive deeds of land from Roger Williams. Thomas Olney was a shoemaker by trade, but at once became prominent in the government of the Providence Plantation, and was almost constantly in the public service. He was treasurer of the colony in 1638 and again in 1669, and was one of the original members of the Baptist church formed there in 1638. He signed the agreement for a form of government, with thirty-eight others, July 27, 1640. He was assistant in 1649, 1653-5455-56, 1664-65-66-67. He was taxed úi 135. 4d. September 2, 1650, and was commissioner in 1656, 1658-59, 1661-62-63. 1└ tne division of lands made February 19, 1665, he received Lot No. 23. He was deputy to the general court in 1665, 1667, 1670-71. He was a member of the town council in 1665-66, 1669-70-71, 1674, 1677 and 1681. In 1665 he was chosen a judge of the justice's court, in. association with Roger Williams and Thomas Harris. His will, made March 21, 1679, was proved October 17, 1682. He died 1682 in Providence. He married, in 1631, Marie Small, who died in the same year as himself. Children: Thomas, mentioned below; Epenetus, born 1634; Nedebiah, 1637, died young; Stephen, died 1658; James, died 1676; Mary, died same year; Lydia, died 1645.
    -------------------------------
    New England families, genealogical and memorial: a record of the ..., Volume 2 edited by William Richard Cutter

    Thomas Olney. the immigrant OLNEY ancestor, came from Hertford,
    Hertfordshire, England. He was born in 1600, came to America in 1635. in the ship "Planter," and settled at Salem, Massachusetts. He was appointed a surveyor in January, 1636, was granted forty acres of land at Jeffrey Creek, now known as Manchester, Massachusetts, and was made a freeman the same year. He was early associated with those who accepted the peculiar ideas of Roger Williams, and with a number of others he was excluded from the colony, March 12, 1638. He accompanied Williams to the new settlement, and became one of the original
    thirteen proprietors of Providence, who purchased their rights from the Indians. In July, 1639, he and his wife were excluded from the church at Salem "because they wholly refused to hear the Church, denying it, and were re-baptized." Thomas Olney became one of the most prominent members of the colony as shown by the number of offices he held. In 1638 he was chosen the first treas'urer; in 1647 a commissioner to form a town government; in 1648 an assistant for Providence, an office which he held almost continually until 1663; in 1645, w'tn Roger Williams and Thomas Harris, he was chosen a judge of the justice court: in 1656 he was chosen to treat with Massachusetts Bay in the matter of the Pawtucket lands; in 1663 his name appears among the grantees of the Royal Charter of Charles, the Second, and in the same year he was chosen an assistant under the new charter. He was one of the founders of the first Baptist church, and at one time was the acting pastor. He was a man of stern or decided opinions. A man resolved and steady to his trust. Inflexible to all, and obstinately just. He was one of the well-to-do men, having much real estate with his homestead on North Main street. He died in 1682, at the age of eighty-two years, and was buried in the family graveyard at the rear of his dwelling. In 1631 he was married to Marie Small, and they had children as follows: Thomas, mentioned below ; Epenetus, born 1634; Nebediah, 1637; Stephen, 1639-40; James; Mary; Lydia,.1644.
    ----------------------------------
    Planter 1635

    Founders of New England: Records of Ships Passenger Lists from England to New England between 1620 and 1640. This set of ships passenger lists includes ships to Virginia (a catch-all phrase to mean almost anywhere along the coast), Barbadoes, Bermuda, West Indies and of course New England
    Lorine's Note: This set of records consists of various passenger lists, names of individuals ready to sail to New England, and names of those taking the Oath of Allegiance (in preparation for sailing). It is not always obvious when each ship left. Researchers will have to determine whether or not a ship made more than one sailing each year it is mentioned. The original spelling has been maintained, so you will see "Landen" for "London", etc. Note that common words found are "uxor" meaning "wife", "mr" for "Master" (of the ship)
    Finding the names: You can browse each list, starting with the one below (scroll down). To browse the passenger lists of all ships I have online for this 20 year period to New England see the list of all known ships that made the voyage. I hope to find passenger lists for every ship on the list, so if you have a ship list, please consider donating it to Olive Tree.
    Transcriber: Laura Freeman
    The Planter, April 16352n Aprilis, 1635.---Theis under written names are to be transported to New England imbaqued in the Planter Nic's Trarice Mr bound thither the p'ties have brought Certificate from the Minsiter of St Albens in Hertfordshire, and Altestacon from the Justtices of peace according to the Lords Order. First Names; Surnames ;Ages

    Jo: Tuttell A Mercer 39
    Joan Tuttell 42
    John Lawrence 17
    Wm Lawrence 12
    Marie Lawrence 9
    Abigall Tuttell 6
    Symon Tuttell 4
    Sam Tuttell 2
    Jo: Tuttell 1
    Joan Autrobuss 65
    Marie Wrust 24
    Tho: Greene 15
    Nathan Huford servant to Jo: Tuttell 16
    Wm Beardsley A Mason 30
    Marie Beardsley 26
    Marie Beardsley 4
    John Beardsley 2
    Joseph Beardsley 6mo:
    Allen Perley Husbandman 27
    Mary Chitwood 24
    Tho: Olney Shoemaker 35
    Marie Olney 30
    Tho: Olney 3
    Etenetus Olney
    Geo: Giddins Husbandman 25
    Jane Giddinss 20
    Tho: Savage Taylor 27
    Richard Harvie A Taylor 22
    ffrancis Peabody Husbandman 21
    Wm Wilcockson Lynen wever 34 34
    Margaret Wilcockson 24
    Jo: Wilcockson 2
    Ann Harvie 22
    Willm ffelloe A Shoemaker 24
    ffrancis Baker A Taylor 24
    Tho: Carter 25 Servant to Geo: Giddens pred.
    Michell Willmson 30 Servantto Geo: Giddens pred
    Elizabeth Morrison 12 Servant to Geo: Giddens pred.

    3 Aprill 1635
    1 2
  • Change Date: 10 May 2010 at 01:00:00



    Father: Thomas OLNEY b: 1574 in St Albans, Hertfordshire, England
    Mother: Mary SMALL b: 1576 in Hertferd, Hertfordshire, England

    Marriage 1 Marie ASHTON b: 26 Aug 1605 in St Albans, Hertford, Hertfordshire, England c: 25 Aug 1605 in Abbey, St Albans, Hertford, England
    • Married: 16 Sep 1629 in St. Albans Abbey, Hertfordshire, England
    Children
    1. Has Children Thomas OLNEY b: 6 Jun 1632 in St. Albans Abbey, Hertfordshire, England c: 6 Jan 1632 in St Albans Abbey, Hertfordshire, England
    2. Has Children Epenetus OLNEY b: 14 Feb 1634 in Hertford, Hrtfds, England c: 14 Feb 1634 in St. Albans Abbey, Hertford, Hertfordshire, England
    3. Has No Children Nedebiah OLNEY b: 27 Jun 1637 in Salem, Essex, Massachusetts, USA c: 27 Aug 1637 in Salem, Essex, Massachusetts, USA
    4. Has No Children Stephen OLNEY b: 1639 in Providence, Providence, Rhode Island, USA
    5. Has No Children James OLNEY b: 1641 in Providence, Providence, Rhode Island, USA
    6. Has Children Mary OLNEY b: 1643 in Providence, Providence, Rhode Island, USA
    7. Has Children Lydia OLNEY b: 1645 in Providence, Providence, Rhode Island, USA

    Sources:
    1. Repository:
        Name: Family History Library
        Salt Lake City, UT 84150 USA

      Title: Ancestral File (R)
      Author: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
      Publication: Copyright (c) 1987, June 1998, data as of 5 January 1998
    2. Repository:
        Name: Family History Library
        Salt Lake City, Utah 84150 USA

      Title: Ancestral File (R)
      Author: The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints
      Publication: Copyright (c) 1987, June 1998, data as of 5 January 1998

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