Hardin Clay Roots #1

Entries: 339551    Updated: 2014-05-01 17:55:46 UTC (Thu)    Contact: Norvan L. Johnson

Everyone in this tree is related "someway" to me. My Y-DNA (Father's line) is of the Haplogroup "G2A3B" ( I have an DNA match with another descendant of Jan Auckesze Van Nuys Born abt 1650 and Barbara Provoost ) - My X-DNA (Mother's Line) is of the haplogroup V

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  • ID: I93421
  • Name: Frederick Barbarossa Von Hohenstaufen
  • Given Name: Frederick Barbarossa Von
  • Surname: Hohenstaufen
  • Prefix: Holy Roman Emperor
  • Suffix: I 1 2 3
  • Sex: M
  • Birth: 1123 in Waiblingen, Germany 4 3
  • Death: 10 Jun 1190 in River Calycandus, Cilicia, Turkey 5 2 3
  • Burial: Tyre 2
  • _TAG:
  • Event: Reigned 1152
  • Note: Emperor of Germany (succeeded his uncle Konrad III). Duk e of Swabia 1147. 6
  • _UID: 3A2B2DFD530E4A7187044FE7AC8BAEEC3D19
  • Note:
    Friedrich I, 'Barbarossa' Emperor Of The Holy Roman Empir e called Barbarossa or Red Beard, succeeded his uncle Conra d III as king of Germany in 1152. He became Holy Roman Empe ror in 1155. The German people admired and respected him a s a great national hero. In 1180, he defeated his great riv al for power in Germany, Henry the Lion, Duke of Saxony an d Bavaria. With the help of loyal princes and an able admin istration, he enforced his authority in Germany and the Sla vic borderlands to the east.

    He was less successful in a bitter struggle against Pope Al exander III and the Lombard League of North Italian cities . The League defeated Frederick at the Battle of Legnano i n 1176. It was in this battle that foot soldiers recorded t heir first great victory over feudal cavalry. The Lombard c ities forced Frederick to grant them self-government in th e Peace of Constance in 1183. The Emperor started on the Th ird Crusade to the Holy Land in 1189, but drowned the nex t year while crossing a river. A German legend, however, sa ys that Barbarossa never really died but is sleeping besid e a huge table in the Kyffhauser Mountains. When his bear d grows completely around the table, the legend says, he wi ll arise and conquer Germany's enemies.

    Frederick I (Holy Roman Empire), called Frederick Barbaross a (1123?-90), Holy Roman emperor and king of Germany (1152- 90), king of Italy (1155-90), and as Frederick III, duke o f Swabia (1147-52, 1167-68). He was born in Waiblingen, th e Unknown of Frederick II of Hohenstaufen, duke of Swabia ( 1090-1147), and the nephew of Conrad III, king of Germany . Conrad III, favoring Frederick over his own Unknown, on h is deathbed recommended to the German princes that Frederic k be chosen for the German kingship and the imperial throne . Accordingly, after the death of his uncle in 1152, Freder ick Barbarossa was made German king and elected Holy Roma n emperor. He conceived of his imperial title as a grant fr om God, through the German princes, and wished to restore t he glory of the Roman Empire. He consequently decided to co nsolidate the imperial position in Germany and Italy and be gan by issuing a general order for peace among the prince s of Germany, at the same time granting them extensive conc essions. In 1154 he proceeded to Italy, where he received t he Lombard crown at Pavia. The following year he was crowne d Holy Roman emperor by Pope Adrian IV, whose authority Fre derick had reinstated before his coronation.

    In 1156 Pope Adrian aroused Frederick against the papacy b y implying in a letter to him that the emperor held lands o nly as a fief from the pope. Two years later Frederick incu rred the hostility of the Lombards by demanding recognitio n of all his royal rights, including his power to appoint t he imperial podesta, or governor, in every town. Such citie s as Milan, Piacenza, Brescia, and Crema considered that de mand a denial of their communal liberties and in 1158 bega n a struggle that lasted until 1183 and required Frederic k to lead five expeditions to Italy. Between 1158 and 116 2 Frederick warred with Milan and its allies, subduing tha t city and confirming claims to other Italian cities. Meanw hile Frederick had set up a series of antipopes in oppositi on to the reigning pope, Alexander III, who espoused the ca use of the Milanese and their allies and who, in 1165, exco mmunicated Frederick. By attacking the Leonine City in Rom e in 1167-68, Frederick was able to install one of the anti popes, Paschal III (died 1168), on the papal throne. The Lo mbard League, consisting of the cities of Milan, Parma, Pad ua, Verona, Piacenza, Bologna, Cremona, Mantua, Bergamo, an d Brescia, was formed in 1167 and eventually acknowledged P ope Alexander as leader. During the next seven years the le ague acquired military strength, rebuilt Milan, constructe d the fortress city of Alessandria, and organized a federa l system of administration. The fifth expedition (1174-76 ) of Frederick to Italy terminated in defeat by the Lombar d League at Legnano. The defeat was significant in militar y history, because it was the first major triumph of infant ry over a mounted army of feudal knights. Frederick was for ced in 1177 to acknowledge Alexander III as pope and in 118 3 to sign the Peace of Constance, acceding to the demands o f the Lombards for autonomy but retaining imperial suzerain ty over the towns.

    Although imperial control in Italy was virtually ended by h is defeat at Legnano, Frederick managed to enhance his pres tige in central Europe. He made Poland tributary to the emp ire, raised Bohemia to the rank of a kingdom, and erected t he margravate of Austria into an independent hereditary duc hy. His own power as emperor in Germany was firmly establis hed in 1180, when he ended his long struggle with the Welf s by putting down a revolt led by the Welf Henry the Lion a nd depriving him of most of his lands.

    Frederick initiated the Third Crusade in 1189, and in the n ext year, having resigned the government of the empire to h is Unknown Henry, later Holy Roman Emperor Henry VI, set ou t for Asia Minor. After gaining two great victories over th e Muslims at Philomelion (now Ak3ehir) and Iconium (now Kon ya), he was drowned in the Calycadnus (now Goksu) River i n Cilicia (now in Turkey) on June 10, 1190.

    Source: 'The World Book Encyclopedia', 1968, p F422. 'Frede rick I (Holy Roman Empire),' Microsoft (R) Encarta. Copyrig ht (c) 1993 Microsoft Corporation. Copyright (c) 1993 FUnkn own & Wagnall's Corporation

    Emperor in 1155. German national hero. 1176 Lombard Leagu e & Pope Alexander III defeats him at Battle of Legnano. 11 80 Defeated Henry the Lion, Duke of Saxony & Bavaria, for u ltimate power in Germany (First victory of infantry over fe udal cavalry). Died on the 3rd Crusade; buried somewhere i n the Holy Land. Duke of Alsace & Swabia.


    Duke of Swabia, King of Germany 9 mar 1158, Emperor of th e West 8 Jun 1155; As Frederick I, Emperor of Germany



    Succeeding his uncle, Konrad III, he was elected King of th e Romans in 1152. He became the ruler of a very much divide d and fragmented empire, threatened from within as well a s from outside. Danes, Vikings, Poles and Magyars were inv ading while rival dukes fought each other instead of the in vaders. A further cause for disharmony was the rivalry wit h the House of Saxony which had already supplied three Germ an Emperors. To complicate matters even further, there wa s the fight for supreme power with the church. In his opin ion power was derived directly from God and merely confirme d, not conferred, by the Pope. He needed to secure his powe r and influence in northern Italy to prevent these Italian s from intriguing with the pope. To achieve this he require d peace in Germany and, after his election, made a truce wi th his kinsman, Heinrich the Lion, by restoring to him Bava ria which had been taken by Konrad III. In 1154 he toure d the Rhineland and the Palatinate, suppressing feuds and e xecuting every peace-breaker he captured. After this he sub dued Boleslav of Poland who had tried to become independan t from the Empire. Friedrich Barbarossa, accompanied by a t housand knights, then set out to Italy for his coronation b y the English pope, Hadrian IV. First he had to liberate Ha drian IV from the Roman mob. Soon Hadrian IV proclaimed t o have "conferred" the imperial crown, after which Friedric h Barbarossa proclaimed throughout the Empire that he had r eceived the imperial crown from God alone. Fearing the nort hern Italians might ally themselves with the pope, he appea red in Verona, in June 1158, with an army of fifty thousan d men. Then he besieged Milan and, after he had taken the c ity, made them pay dues to him. However, Hadrian IV died an d was replaced by Pope Alexander III, as resolute and intel ligent as Friedrich Barbarossa. Friedrich then appointed a n antipope, Victor IV, after which Alexander III excommunic ated the Emperor and Milan revolted.This time the populatio n was starved out and the city razed to the ground. Encour aged by Alexander III who had fled to France, the Lombard s rebelled against the harsh German administration. Victo r IV died and was replaced by another antipope, Paschal III . Friedrich Barbarossa waited three years and then attacke d Rome with a large army. Alexander III, returned from Fran ce, this time fled to Sicily. Having secured Paschal III i n Rome, the plague struck his army and Friedrich Barbaross a was forced to retreat to Germany, crossing the Alps disgu ised as a servant.
    In 1176 he returned to Italy to reassert h is authority, but was heavily defeated at Legnano
    and, in 1177, Friedrich made peace with Al exander III. Nine years later he arranged the
    marriage of his son to Constance, heires s presumptive of Sicily. Even though in the beginning
    of his reign he had tried to befried Heinr ich the Lion, the latter had refused to assist in Italy
    and tried to make his Saxon territory semi -independent within the empire. Enemies of Heinrich
    the Lion complained to Emperor Friedrich w ho then, when Heinrich the Lion ignored the
    imperial summons, occupied and divided Sax ony in a lightning campaign and banished
    Heinrich the Lion to France.
    During his reign Germany prospered; road s were built and new trade routes were opened.
    Between 1150 and 1175 the number of Germa n towns doubled, a unified coinage was
    introduced and literature flourished. Near ly seventy years old, he set out to go on crusade. A
    large army was collected and went overlan d towards the Bosphorus while Richard the
    Lionheart and the French King Philippe wen t by sea. All went well at first; but when Friedrich
    Barbarossa reached Byzantine territory, hi s army was attacked and robbed during the nights.
    Also, food was scarce while the populatio n had fled, taking everything with them. Then the
    army sent to attack them by the Byzantin e Emperor was defeated, after which they received
    Byzantine support.
    They were a year on the road before arrivi ng in Asia Minor where they were attacked by
    hostile horsemen. His army marched throug h the mountains where again there was no food;
    yet half-starved, they continued, now redu ced to six hundred knights who, become delirious,
    saw visions. Nevertheless they still attac ked and conquered Iconium which had been
    defended by a much stronger army. Later, w ith food aplenty, they recovered to continue their
    way to the Holy Land. There had been one p rophecy: that he would die by drowning; yet
    another, that he would win his empire lik e a fox, preserve it like a lion, but die like a dog.
    They were near Seleucia in the intense hea t of June when they crossed a fast flowing river.
    Resting in the burning sun, he had some fo od, then decided to bathe in the river. Against
    advice, he went in
    and his men saw him dissappear. When his b ody was found much later, his knights decided to
    return home.
    However, according to myth, he never die d but is simply asleep, one day to return and save
    Germany from its enemies.




    Father: Frederick Of Swabia Von Hohenstaufen b: Abt 1090 in Swaben, Bavaria
    Mother: Judith De Bavaria b: 1103 in Saxony

    Marriage 1 Adelheid Von Vohlburg b: 1122
    • Divorced: Y
    • Married: 1147
    • Event: Divorced Divorced
    • Event: Divorced Divorced 1153
    • Change Date: 19 Jan 2014

    Marriage 2 Beatrice Of Macon De Burgundy b: 1145
    • Married: 10 Jun 1156 7 2
    • Change Date: 19 Jan 2014
    Children
    1. Has No Children Hohenstaufen Of Germany Beatrice
    2. Has Children Otto De Burgundy b: 1167
    3. Has No Children Henry Of Sicily Von Hohenstaufen b: Nov 1165
    4. Has Children Philip Of Swabia Von Hohenstaufen b: Bet 1177 and 1181

    Sources:
    1. Abbrev: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America bef 1760
      Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to A merica bef 1760
      Author: Frederick Lewis Weis
      Publication: 7th ed Genealogical Publishing, Baltimore 1992
      Note:
      ABBR Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Cam e to America bef 1760
      Page: line 45 p 47
      Quality: 3
    2. Abbrev: Royalty for Commoners
      Title: Royalty for Commoners
      Author: Stuart, Roderick W.
      Publication: Genealogical Publishing Co.
      Note:
      ABBR Royalty for Commoners
      NS386753

      Source Media Type: Book
    3. Abbrev: Ancestral Roots of Sixty Colonists Who Came to New England between 1623 and 1650
      Title: Ancestral Roots of Sixty Colonists Who Came to New Englan d between 1623 and 1650
      Author: Frederick Lewis Weis
      Publication: Sixth Edition Genealogical Publishing, Inc. 1988 ISBN 0-806 3-1207-6
    4. Abbrev: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America bef 1760
      Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to A merica bef 1760
      Author: Frederick Lewis Weis
      Publication: 7th ed Genealogical Publishing, Baltimore 1992
      Note:
      ABBR Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Cam e to America bef 1760
      Page: line 45 p 47
      Quality: 3
      Text: no place
    5. Abbrev: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America bef 1760
      Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to A merica bef 1760
      Author: Frederick Lewis Weis
      Publication: 7th ed Genealogical Publishing, Baltimore 1992
      Note:
      ABBR Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Cam e to America bef 1760
      Page: line 45 p 47
      Quality: 3
      Text: died on the 3rd Crusade, no place
    6. Abbrev: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America bef 1760
      Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to A merica bef 1760
      Author: Frederick Lewis Weis
      Publication: 7th ed Genealogical Publishing, Baltimore 1992
      Note:
      ABBR Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Cam e to America bef 1760
      Page: line 45 p 47
      Quality: 3
      Text: no succession info
    7. Abbrev: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America bef 1760
      Title: Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to A merica bef 1760
      Author: Frederick Lewis Weis
      Publication: 7th ed Genealogical Publishing, Baltimore 1992
      Note:
      ABBR Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Cam e to America bef 1760
      Page: line 45 p 47
      Text: m 1156, his 2nd m

  • Index | Descendancy | Register | Pedigree | Ahnentafel | Download GEDCOM | Public Profile | Add Post-em

    DO NOT TAKE THIS WORK AS GOSPEL. I had to cut the tree to only relatives as it is too big for one data base. (Many families are split up on the three files) My other trees are Hardin Clay Roots #2 and Hardin Clay Roots #3 (count started 22 Nov 2010) free counters

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