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  • ID: I22504
  • Name: Roger De Mortimer
  • Given Name: Roger
  • Surname: De Mortimer
  • Prefix: Baron
  • Sex: M
  • Birth: 1231 in Cwmaron Castle, Rdnrsh, Wales.[
  • Death: 1282 in Kingsland (Hereford) England
  • _PPEXCLUDE:
  • _UID: DE5F44A993F040ED9AD31293C7A7060464C8
  • Change Date: 25 May 2009 at 01:00
  • Note:
    Upon having procured the honor of knighthood to be conferred by King Edward I., he caused a tournament to be held, at his own cost, at Kenilworth, where he sumptuously entertained a hundred knights and as many ladies, for three days, the like whereof was never before known in England; and there began the round table, so called from the place wherein they practiced those feats, which was encompassed by a strong wall, in a circular form. Upon the 4th day the golden lion, in token of triumph, having been yielded to him, he carried it with all that company to Warwick. The fame whereof being spread into foreign countries occasioned the Queen of Navarre to send him certain wooden bottles, bound with golden bars and wax, under the pretense of wine, but in truth filled with gold, which for many ages after were preserved in the Abbey of Wigmore. Whereupon for the love of that queen, he had added a carbuncle to his arms. This celebrated feudal lord died in 1282, and was succeeded by his eldest surviving son, Edmund.


    Roger de Mortimer , in the 31st year of King Henry III., paying 2,000 marks to the king, had livery of all his lands, excepting those whereof Gladys, his mother then surviving was endowed. In six years afterwards he attended the king in his expedition into Gascony, and in a few years subsequently, when Llewellyn, Prince of Wales, began again to make incursion upon the marches, received command to assist Humphrey de Bohun, Earl of Hereford, in the defense of the country lying between Montgomery, and the lands of the Earl of Gloucester. In the 42nd year of the same reign he had another military summons to march with the king against the Welsh; and being in that service, had a special discharge of his scutage for those twenty-six knights' fees and a sixth part which he held in right of Maud, his wife, one of the daughters and co-heirs of William de Braose, of Brecknock. In two years afterwards he was made captain-general of all the king's forces in Wales, all the barons marchers receiving command to be attendant on him with their whole strength; and he was the same year constituted the Governor of the castle of Hereford. But notwithstanding this extensive power, and those great resources, he was eventually worsted by Llewellyn, and constrained to sue for permission to depart, which the Welsh price conceded, owing to his consanguity. After this he took and active part in the contest between Henry III. and the insurrectionary barons in favor of the former. He was at the battle of Lewes, whence he fled into Wales, and afterwards successfully planned the escape of Prince Edward. Having accomplished his prince's freedom, Mortimer, directing all his energies to the embodying a sufficient force to meet the enemy, soon placed Prince Edward in a situation to fight and win the great battle of Evesham (August 4, 1265), by which the king was restored to his freedom and his crown. In the celebrated conflict Mortimer commanded the third division of the royal army, and for his faithful services obtained, in the October following, a grant of the whole earldom and honor of Oxford, and all other the lands of Robert de Vere, Earl of Oxford, at that time and by that treason forfeited. The Dictum of Kenilworth followed soon after the victory of Evesham, by which the defeated barons were suffered to regain their lands upon the payment of a stipulated fine, but this arrangement is said to have caused great irritation among the barons marchers, (Mortimer with the rest), who had acquired grants of these estates. He was, however, subsequently entrusted, by the crown, with the castle of Hereford, which he had orders to fortify, and was appointed Sheriff of Herefordshire. After the accession of Edward I., he continued to enjoy the sunshine of royal favor, and had other valuable grants from the crown. He married, as already stated above, Maud Braose, eldest daughter and a co-heir of William de Braose, of Brecknock. They had the following children:
    1. Ralph de Mortimer, d.v.p.
    2. Edmund de Mortimer, his successor.
    3. Roger de Mortimer, 5th Lord of Wigmore, and lord of Chirke, part of the territories of Griffith ap Madoc, and was summoned to parliament from February 6, 1299, to November 3, 1396, as "Roger de Mortuomari," and as Baron Mortimer, of Chirke, from August 26, 1307, to May 15, 1321 (See Burke, Page 385-6). Eventually, his grandson sold to the lordship of Chirke to Richard Fitz Alan, Earl of Arundel.
    4. William de Mortimer, of Bridgewater, an eminent soldier, married Hawise Musegros, heir of Robert de Musegros and his wife, Agnes Ferrers, but d.s.p.
    5. Geoffrey de Mortimer, d.s.p., d.v.p.
    6. Isabella Mortimer, married John Fitz Alan III See continuation if this lineage in the Fitz Alan Line in Volume II.
    Upon having procured the honor of knighthood to be conferred by King Edward I., he caused a tournament to be held, at his own cost, at Kenilworth, where he sumptuously entertained a hundred knights and as many ladies, for three days, the like whereof was never before known in England; and there began the round table, so called from the place wherein they practiced those feats, which was encompassed by a strong wall, in a circular form. Upon the 4th day the golden lion, in token of triumph, having been yielded to him, he carried it with all that company to Warwick. The fame whereof being spread into foreign countries occasioned the Queen of Navarre to send him certain wooden bottles, bound with golden bars and wax, under the pretense of wine, but in truth filled with gold, which for many ages after were preserved in the Abbey of Wigmore. Whereupon for the love of that queen, he had added a carbuncle to his arms. This celebrated feudal lord died in 1282, and was succeeded by his eldest surviving son, Edmund.
    .
    He was succeeded by his eldest son, Roger.

    8. Roger Mortimer, 2nd Baron Mortimer, born in 1287, was summoned to parliament from February 22, 1306, to December 3, 1326 (from the accession of Edward II., with addition of "De Wigmore"). This nobleman, so notorious in the histories as the paramour of Isabel, Queen Consort of the unfortunate Edward II., was in his sixteenth year at the time of his father's death, and was placed by the king (Edward I.) in ward with Piers Gaveston, so that to redeem himself, and for permission to marry whom he pleased, he was obliged to pay Gaveston 2,500 marks, and thereupon married Joane Geneville, born in 1285, died in 1356, daughter of Peter de Geneville and his wife, Joane Lusignan. Peter was the son of Geoffrey de Geneville, Lord of Trim, in Ireland and conveyed eventually the whole inheritance of the Genevilles, and half the land of the Lacys, into that family. See Burke, pg. 228. Peter de Geneville, died in 1292, was the second son of Geoffrey de Geneville and his wife Maud Lacy, daughter of Walter Lacy, Lord of Meath. Geoffrey was the son of Peter de Geneville, a Provencal, who died in 1249, stated by Matthew of Paris, to have been a man of humble birth, and by others to have been Lord of Vancouleur, and brother of John de Geneville, or Joinville, the historian of the Crusade of St. Louis, who was Governor of Windsor Castle, and dying in 1249, was succeeded by his son and heir, Geoffrey, who in the 38th year of King Henry III., had livery of the castle of Trim, in Ireland. In four years afterwards he received a military summons to march against the Welsh, and in the 44th year of the same king, being then one of the barons marchers, he had command to repair to the castle of Wales, and to reside there. In the 10th year of King Edward I., he was in the expedition made against the Welsh, and in fifteen years subsequently he was in the wars of Gascony. For all which service he was summoned to parliament as a baron, February 6, 1299, and from that period to November 3, 1306. He married Maud, daughter and heir of Gilbert de Lacy (Lacey), son of Walter de Lacy (Lacey), Lord of Maeth. He died in 1307, succeeded by his son, Peter, whose older brother, Geoffrey d.s.p. in the lifetime of his father. In the 34th year of Edward I., he received the honor of knighthood, and the same year attended the king into Scotland, where we find him again in the 3rd year of Edward II., and the same year he was constituted Governor of the castle of Buelt, in Brecknockshire. In the 7th, 8th, and 9th years he was likewise in Scotland, and then appointed lord-lieutenant of Ireland. During the remainder of the unhappy Edward's reign he attached himself to the interests of the queen, and at length fled with her and Prince Edward into France. Returning, however, and his party triumphing, he was advanced to the dignity of Earl of March soon after the accession of King Edward III., and he held a round table the same year at Bedford. But hereupon becoming proud beyond measure (so that his own son, Geoffrey, called him the King of Folly), he kept a round table of knights in Wales, in imitation of King Arthur. "Other particulars," says Dugdale, "of his haughtiness and insolence were these, viz., that with Queen Isabel, he caused parliament to be held at Northampton, where an unworthy agreement was made with the Scots, and Ragman's Roll of Homage of Scotland was traitorously delivered as also the black cross, which King Edward I. brought into England, out of the abbey of Scone, and then accounted a precious relic. That (with the queen) he caused the young king to ride twenty-four miles in one night, towards Bedford, to destroy the Earl of Lancaster and his adherents, saying that they imagined the king's death. That he followed Queen Isabel to Nottingham, and lodged in one house with her. That he commanded the treasure of the realm, and assumed the authority, which by common consent in parliament was conferred upon Henry, Earl of Lancaster, at the king's coronation." His career was not however of long continuance, for, the king becoming sensible of his folly and vices, had him suddenly seized in the castle of Nottingham, and conveyed prisoner to London, where, being impeached before parliament, he was convicted under various charges, the first of which was privity to the murder of King Edward II. in Berkeley Castle; and receiving sentence of death was hanged in 1330, at the summons gallows, called Elmes, near Smithfield, where his body was permitted to hang for two days and three nights naked, before it was interred in the Grey Friars; whence in some years afterwards it was removed to Wigmore. The Earl of March left issue four sons and seven daughters as follows:
    1. Edmund Mortimer. See below.
    2. Roger Mortimer, married in 1321 Joane Butler.
    3. Geoffrey Mortimer, Lord of Towyth.
    4. John Mortimer, slain in a tournament at Shrewsbury.
    5. Katherine Mortimer, died 1371, married in 1337 Thomas de Beauchamp, Earl of Warwick, an original Knight of the Garter.
    6. Joane Mortimer, who died before 1351, married some years before June 13 1330, as his first wife, James Audley, Lord Audley, a descendant of Surety William Malet, born January 8, 1312/13, died April 1, 1386, son of Nicholas Audley, Lord Audley of Heleigh and his wife Joan Martin (her 2nd marriage). James Audley married (2) Isabel le Strange, said to be the daughter of Roger le Strange of Knockyn. Joane Mortimer and James Audley had one son and two daughters as follows:
    1. Nicholas Audley, Lord Audley, born about 1328, d.s.p., 1391.
    2. Joan Audley, married John Touchet of Markeaton, co. Derby, who was slain at Rochelle in 1371.
    3. Margaret (Margery) Audley, married Fulk FitzWarin, son of Fulk FitzWarin, Knight of the Garter, and his wife Joan Beaumont, daughter of Henry Beaumont and his wife Alice Comyn.
    7. Agnes Mortimer, married Laurence Hastings, Earl of Pembroke, died 1348, a descendant of Surety Roger Bigod.
    8. Margaret Mortimer, married (1) Robert de Vere, 6th Earl of Oxford, who died without issue; and (2) Thomas de Berkeley, Lord Berkeley, son and heir of Maurice de Berkeley, a descendant of the Surety, Saire de Quincy.
    See the continuation of this lineage in the Berkeley Line of Volume II.
    9. Maud (Matilda) Mortimer, married John de Cherlton, son and heir of John, Lord Powys.
    10. Blanche Mortimer, married Peter de Grandison, died 1358, son of William de Garndison and his wife Sibilla Tregoz. They had no issue.
    11. Beatrix (Beatrice) Mortimer, married (1) Edward, son and heir of Thomas of Brotherton, Earl Marshal of England, and (2) Thomas de Braose, son of Peter de Braose (half brother of William de Braose, Lord Braose of Gower). The issue of none of their three sons survived. Their daughter Joane also died without issue. But their daughter Beatrice Braose, married William Saye, Lord Saye, and they had a daughter Elizabeth Saye, who married (1) John de Falvesley, who died without issue about 1392, and married (2) William Heron, Knight of Applynden, who died without issue in 1404.
    Upon the execution and attainder of the earl all the honors of Roger Mortimer became forfeited.
    9. Edmund Mortimer, the eldest son of Roger, born about 1305, although he did not succeed to the earldom, was summoned to parliament, as Lord Mortimer, November 20, 1331. He married June 27, 1316 Elizabeth Badlesmere, one of the daughters and at length co-heir of Bartholomew Badlesmere (commonly called the Rich), Lord Badlesmere, of Ledes Castle, in Kent, and his wife, Margaret Clare. She married, after his decease, William de Bohun, Earl of Northampton. She was aged 25 in 1338 and died June 8, 1355. See the continuation of this lineage in the Bohun Line in Volume II.



    20 July 1397 Roger Mortimer, of Edvin, Herefordshire, with his sons
    Richard and Roger, were summoned for felonious assault at Kyre Wyard,
    Worcestershire [citing Proceedings before the Justices of the Peace in the
    fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, The Ames Foundation (1938)].
    ....
    Evans suggests it is possible that there were two Roger Mortimers in
    succession, and it does seem difficult to identify the Roger who was
    summoned in 1397, together with his sons Richard and Roger, with the Roger
    who died in 1402 to be succeeded by a son John, born as late as 1388.
    Perhaps instead the Roger who died in 1402 was the younger Roger who
    occurs
    in 1397? Even if so, that would still leave unresolved the exact
    relationship with the younger John, of 1361. It seems more work is needed
    to
    be sure of the relationship between the earlier and later descendants of
    Roger de Mortimer of Chirk.


    I have started to look at some of the references given by Evans and others.

    It's interesting to note that John, the son of Roger by his deceased wife
    Maud, was returned as one of the heirs of Maud's mother Elizabeth, wife of
    Sir John Herle, in 1398 [Cal. Inq. p. m. vol. 17, no 1059 (p. 386)]. So it's
    very unlikely that Roger could have had older sons Richard and Roger by
    Maud, who were living in 1397. Also, land in "Edvin" does seem to have been
    held by the Mortimers separately from the Herle marriage [VCH Worcestershire
    vol. 4, p. 273 has a carucate in Edvin Loach conveyed to Roger Mortimer in
    1393 by Hugh de Hawkesley, together with Tedstone Wafer, though confusingly
    it goes on to claim that the estate at Edvin in the 1402 IPM of Roger
    Mortimer was in Edvin Ralph, not Edvin Loach. This is not borne out by the
    published abstract of the Herefordshire inquisition [Cal. Inq. p. m. vol.
    18, no 1094 (p. 373)], which refers to a carucate in Edvin Loach.].

    On the other hand, another statement in the Herefordshire inquisition may
    indicate an alternative explanation of the puzzle of Roger's sons, Richard
    and Roger, who occur in 1397. The inquisition notes that Roger's son and
    heir, John, was a minor, and lists various people who were holding Roger's
    lands, "title unknown". Among these is "John Mortymer, bastard son of
    Roger". If John had an elder illegitimate son named John, perhaps he could
    have had other illegitimate sons as well - maybe this could explain the
    occurrence of Richard and Roger in 1397.

    as wrote by Chris Phillips




    Father: Ralph De Mortimer
    Mother: Gwladus Ddu Of Wales

    Marriage 1 Maud De Braiose Or Brewes Or Breuse b: Abt 1230 in Bramber Castle, (Or Arundel), England
    • Married: 1247
    • Note: 2 _PREF Y
    • Change Date: 27 Apr 2016
    Children
    1. Has Children Isabella De Mortimer b: 1248 in Wigmore, Ludlow, Herefordshire, England
    2. Has No Children Ralph De Mortimer
    3. Has No Children Roger De Mortimer
    4. Has No Children William De Mortimer
    5. Has No Children Geoffrey De Mortimer
    6. Has Children Edmond De Mortimer b: 1261 in Wigmore (Hereford) England
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