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  • ID: I14261
  • Name: George Marjoribanks
  • Given Name: George
  • Surname: Marjoribanks
  • Sex: M
  • Birth: Abt 1697 in Scotland
  • Death: 21 Nov 1740 in Raleigh Parish, Amelia, Virginia
  • _PPEXCLUDE:
  • _UID: C5C1E68C3F23424C9F72591A60A317C04609
  • Change Date: 21 Sep 2014 at 04:33
  • Note:
    "George Marjoribanks (USA spelling as 'Marchbanks' or sometimes 'Marshbanks')."


    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clan_Marjoribanks

    Other Branches of the Marjoribanks Family
    A George Marjoribanks (hypothesised to have been the son of George Marjoribanks, a junior member of the family of Marjoribanks of Balbardie and of that Ilk took part in the Jacobite rising and fought with the Scottish army against the English at the Battle of Preston (1715) . He was captured and transported to Virginia in 1716. Many of his descendants now live in the USA, in particular, North and South Carolina \, where there are regular meetings of the Marjoribanks family.
    A junior line of the Marjoribanks family called Marjoribanks of Lees is descended from James Marjoribanks, a younger son of Thomas Marjoribanks of Ratho and Joseph Marjoribanks, a wine and fish merchant in Edinburgh who died in 1635.[Joseph's son John Marjoribanks matriculated the arms of Marjoribanks of Leuchie in 1673.[ A century later the arms were re-matriculated as Marjoribanks of Lees by Edward Marjoribanks of Lees.[ His son, Sir John Marjoribanks, was Lord Provost of Edinburgh ] and became a baronet,his grandson David, Baron Marjoribank was elevated to the peerage[18] as was another grandson Dudley Coutts Marjoribanks, 1st Baron Tweedmouth . These titles have since become extinct but there are several descendants of the Marjoribanks of Lees line living in England and the Channel Islands today


    Ship Elizabeth & Ann
    http://www.immigrantships.net/v2/1700v2/elizabeth&ann17160114.html


    George the Jacobite, as he is now known in the family, did not willingly
    come to the colonies. He fought with the Scottish forces against the
    English at the Battle of Preston during the 1715 Jacobite rebellion....an
    unsuccessful attempt to restore exiled King James III (the 'Old Pretender')
    to the throne of England and Scotland.

    George was captured at Preston. He was taken to Liverpool, England where
    he was put aboard the ship Elizabeth and Anne which arrived at Yorktown in
    Colonial Virginia on January 14, 1716. (More data re ship Elizabeth and
    Anne is included elsewhere in this essay - Jim McDonald).


    "The record of the trial for the rebels captured at Preston is at the Public
    Records Office, Kew, London identified as KB8/66 and is filed in 2 boxes
    containing several folders each bearing the heading 'A List of ye Rebell
    Prisoners' at (place), showing their Christian Names and surnames, the
    Parish and county they dwelled in.

    Roger Marjoribanks, family historian and principal researcher, examined
    KB8/66 and discovered in Box 1 "Geo. Margerybanks" listed among a group of
    "Scotch servants" attached to an Argyllshire regiment imprisoned at the
    small Lancashire town of Wigan, but he himself was from the village of
    Singdean in Roxburghshire in the Scottish Borders. Although the name is
    mis-spelled, it undoubtedly refers to this ancestor of many American family
    members.

    Roger Marjoribanks says it has not been possible to identify George further
    since early registers for the area have not been preserved but the
    investigation will continue. The discovery of the Public Records documents
    tends to cast doubt on earlier speculation that George the Jacobite was the
    grandson or great grandson of Thomas Marjoribanks of Ratho who died in 1557.

    (SOURCES of the above paragraphs: July 9, 2000 e mail from Roger
    Marjoribanks to Jim McDonald and The Marjoribanks Letter #15, December 2000,
    Page 4 titled "New Light on George the Jacobite.")

    "Extensive research in Britain has failed to uncover his family origins. It
    seems likely that, on becoming a prisoner, he deliberately hid his family
    connections to avoid more severe punishment. The best theory is that George
    the Jacobite may have been the son of George Marjoribanks of the family of
    Marjoribanks of Balbardie.

    "In 1717, the British Parliament passed an Act of Grace and Free Pardon to
    George Marjoribanks and other participants in the Battle of Preston.

    "George the Jacobite, after settling in Amelia County, spelled his name as
    Marchbanks either as a convenience or to conform with society."
    (SOURCE of the above paragraphs: The Marjoribanks Journal No. 2 dated
    January 1994, page 12).


    An additional smattering of information about George's early years in
    Scotland are the following comments from current family historian Roger
    Marjoribanks - who lives in England - in response to my inquiry about
    George's birth date re a April 13, 2001 e mail I (Jim McDonald) received
    from Cousin Bill Hesser in Palo Alto, California giving George's birth date
    as about 1695.

    "We have no authentic information about George's birth date. The only tiny
    clue we have is that he is described as "servant" in the list of prisoners
    kept at Wigan after the 1715 rebellion. This might just suggest that he was
    at the time on the young side, maybe too young to be an active combatant.
    However, that is far from conclusive.

    "I would also guess that he was unlikely to be much, if at all, younger than
    his wife - again, purely a surmise. (Jim McDonald comment. George's wife,
    Ann Echols, was born about 1700 in King and Queen County, Virginia re family
    data).
    (SOURCE of the above paragraphs is Roger Marjoribanks April 14, 2001 e mail
    to Jim McDonald.)
    It seems likely that George was not married at the time he fought in the
    Battle of Preston and was deported to Colonial Yorktown, Virginia aboard the
    ship Elizabeth and Anne.

    "The ship Elizabeth and Anne was being used in the slave trade at the time
    of the 1715 Jacobite rebellion. It's merchant owners thought they might be
    more highly rewarded by handling the transport of prisoners for the King.
    The arrangement was to take the prisoners on consignment and receive payment
    when a receipt for their delivery was presented to His Majesty's Court in
    London.

    "George Marjoribanks was included on the list of 112 rebel prisoners
    imported by Capt. Edwd Trafford in the Elizabeth & Anne from Liverpole.
    George was identified on this list as 'not indented'.

    "The official document reads: 'Liverpool, England to Yorktown, Virginia -
    14 January 1716. Virginia - By his Majestys' Lieutenant Governor &
    Commander in Cheif (sic) of this dominion. These are to certify that the
    list of one hunderd & Twelve Rebel Prisoners, Imported into this Colony in
    the ship Elizabeth and Ann, of Liverpool, Edward Trafford Master, was taken
    (by my order) upon the arrival of the faid (sic) ship in York River by the
    office of the Customs there, and contains the Names of all the Prifoners
    (sic) Imported in the sd (sic) ship & that besides the said one hundres and
    twelve prsons, the Mafter (sic) did Report that one other Prisoner died at
    sea -
    Given under my hand at Williamsburgh this 14th day of January 1716.

    "These prisoners were probably some of the followers of the Pretender
    captured at Prestton, and condemned to be transported to the Colony in
    Virginia, after having been carried to London for trial.

    Source of the above paragraphs is the Immigrant Ships Transcribers Guild
    Volume 2 - Ship Elizabeth and Ann, acquired by Jim McDonald in July 2000
    Colonial Virginia, to have some idea about it during George's arrival and
    lifetime, was first settled in 1607. George's death in 1740 was (1) 35
    years before the start of the American Revolutionary Period....and (2) 48
    years before Virginia's ratification of the U.S. Constitution.

    When the about 21 year old George Marchbanks arrived in at Yorktown in 1716,
    the town was only 25 years old - but already a bustling and prosperous
    18th-century seaport. It was founded in 1691 by an Act of the General
    Assembly of Virginia when 50 acres of land were purchased for a port town on
    the York River. The price paid for the land was 10,000 pounds of tobacco,
    which was then the standard "currency" of Virginia. This land was surveyed
    in 83 half-acre lots and a number of streets were laid out and named - all
    of which remain to this day.

    George surely would have seen, and perhaps even set foot in, some of the now
    old Yorktown structures that were still new in 1716 when he first saw them:
    the 19 year old Grace Episcopal Church dating from 1697; the one year old
    Custom House dating from 1715; the hotel opened in 1725, 9 years after his
    arrival and a number of 17 year old dwellings dating from 1699.

    It's also very likely that George may have visited Colonial Williamsburg,
    which was Britain's largest, wealthiest and most populous American colony
    from 1699 to 1780.
    ____________________________________________________________________________
    _________
    George the Jacobite married Ann Echols before 1723. Ann was born about 1700
    in King and Queen County, Virginia. She died in 1746 in Amelia County,
    Virginia. (SOURCE: Ancestors Ira Wall Ellis and Lena Jewel Ellis beginning
    with son Wendell Phillips Ellis re www/family tree maker dated 2 October
    1998. Ann's parents, brothers and sisters are listed in this source).

    Ann and George had the following children:
    1 JOHN b. 16 March 1722 or 1723. d. 26 January 1724 or 1725 in New Kent Parish, VA
    2 WILLIAM b. about 1740. d. after 1810 in Pendleton District, SC.
    3 GEORGE b. 28 September 1725.
    4 JOSEPH b. 4 October 1732. d. 10 March 1733.
    5 LUCY b. about 1720. Married a Prisher. 2nd marriage to Joseph Collins of
    Halifax County, VA. Lucy d. between 1794 and 1798 in Woodford Co., KY

    (SOURCE: Collins Mess page 12 dated 2 October 1998 and Corie Madeline
    Collins home page dated 2 October 1998).
    MARY ANN b. about 1735. d. 5 November 1817 in Amelia Co., VA.
    URSULA b. about 1734. d. about 1830 in Spartanburg Co., SC. m. Charles
    Dean, Sr. (SOURCE: Terri Dean Degenaars e mail about Ursula Marchbanks
    dated 7 July 1999).
    SARAH birth and death dates unknown.
    (SOURCE: Essay dedicated to George Marchbanks
    www.geocities.com/Heartland/Acres <http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Acres> etc. dated 13 November 1998).

    George the Jacobite was a large landowner in Amelia County, having about
    1225 acres at the time he wrote his will.

    George's will indicates that he lived out his life in the Parish of Raleigh,
    Amelia Co., VA.

    George d. November 1740. The date may have been 21 November.
    ____________________________________________________________________________
    _________

    It is interesting to speculate about George the Jacobite as a person. He
    obviously had strong feelings about the political situation between his
    Scottish homeland and England. This is shown in his participation in the
    Jacobite uprising that resulted in his deportation to Colonial Virginia.

    George apparently felt a sense of duty toward his family members remaining
    in Scotland as there is some thought that one reason for being unable to
    accurately trace his ancestors with absolute certainity may PERHAPS have
    resulted from his desire to not reveal their names in order to help protect
    them and/or himself from English authority.

    George was obviously successful after his arrival in Amelia County. Proof
    of this is that his plantation contained more that 1200 acres at his death.
    While it's not known what kind of crops were grown on this plantation, a
    reasonable assumption is that plants like cotton and tobacco were raised as
    cash crops, and that vegetables of all kinds were grown as food for George
    and his family.

    George was probably not very tall....as pictures of later generations of
    Marchbanks men appear to be small in stature.

    George was, however, probably physically strong with good endurance based on
    his experience in the Battle of Preston and his success as a farmer in
    Colonial Virginia....as carving a 1200 plus acre plantation out of the land
    must have called for a huge amount of physical work and stamina in clearing
    and planting the land.

    This much is certain....George and Ann are two folks to be recognized and
    respected as the persons who fostered the generations of Marchbanks in
    America that remain until this day. They are indeed two people "for the
    ages" to all Marchbanks family members that now spread from the Atlantic
    Ocean all across these United States to the Pacific Ocean.


    Jim McDonald
    Descendent of George Marchbanks
    May 28, 2001
    Austin, Texas
    jim91429@msn.com


    Copyright May 28, 2001 by Jim McDonald

    Saved as George Marchbanks on disk





    George Marjoribanks was my immigrant ancestor. He was born in Scotland and he is speculated to be the son of George, grandson of George, ggrandson of Thomas, gggrandson of John, ggggrandson of Thomas Marjoribanks of Ratho. After serving in the Jacobite uprising, he was captured and imprisoned, then deported from England. He arrived in Virginia on the Elizabeth and Ann on January 14, 1716. There he met and married Ann Eckols about 1721, daughter of John and Mary Cave Eckols. The name was shortened to Marchbanks after George's arrival in the New World.

    George and Ann had many children, all born in VA. George died in 1740 and Ann in 1746. Children of George and Ann Marjoribanks:
    John b. March 16, 1722/23 d. January 26, 1724/25 in New Kent Parish, VA
    George b. September 28, 1725
    Lucy b. unkn d. unkn married Prisher
    Sarah b. unkn d. unkn
    William b. abt 1730 d aft 1810 in Pendleton District, S.C.
    Joseph b. October 4, 1732 d. March 10, 1732/33
    Ursula b. abt 1734 d. abt 1830 in Spartanburg County, S.C.
    Mary Ann b. abt 1735 d. November 5, 1817 in Amelia County, VA

    To paraphrase information from that site, George was born in Scotland and captured in a Jacobite uprising, imprisoned and then deported to the colonies. In the colonies he met and married Ann Eckols, daughter of John and Mary [Cave] Eckols. From this union there were eight children born but only seven were named in George's will, The will of George Marchbanks can be found in Will book No. 1, 1734-1761, page 11-12. It was proved 21 Nov. 1740, page 12a.in the Parish of Raleigh in Amelia County, Virginia. He left to his younger son Joseph: plantation and two hundred and seventy five acres of land, to son George two hundred seventy five acres of land next to Joseph, to son William two hundred seventy five acres of land next to George, to daughter Lucy Prisher one hundred acres of land, to daughter Ursula one hundred acres of land and to daughter Sarah one hundred acres of land. Ann, his beloved wife, and William Echols and Richard Echols were executors. Witnessed by Hiz Ford, William Clemond, Jos. Collins Numerous court records for George Marchbanks can be found in Goochland County, Virginia between 1729 and 1737. By 1740 the records switch to Amelia County, Virginia.



    Marshbanks was transported from England to VA as a Jacobite
    prisoner who took part in the rebellion in Scotland in 1716.

    Immigrant Ships
    Transcribers Guild
    Ship Elizabeth & Ann
    The Elizabeth & Anne was being used in the slave trade at the time of the 1715 Jacobite rebellion. It's merchant owners thought they might be more highly rewarded by handling the "transport" of prisoners for the King. The arrangement was to take the prisoners on consignment and receive payment when a receipt for their delivery was presented to His Majesty's Court in London.
    Liverpool, England to Yorktown, Virginia
    14 January 1716


    Virginia-
    By his Majestys' Lieutenant Governor & Commander in Cheif of this
    Dominion-
    These are to certify that the above Lift of one hundred & Twelve
    Rebel Prisoners, Imported into this Colony in the Ship Elizabeth & Ann,
    of Liverpool, Edward Trafford Master, was taken (by my order) upon the
    arrival of the faid Ship in York River by the officer of the Customs
    there, and contains the Names of all the Prifoners Imported in the sd
    ship & that besides the said one hundres & twelve persons, the Mafter
    did Report that one other Prisoner by name Duncan Mackfale died at sea,
    which upon Examination of the other Prisoners apeared to be true-
    Given under my hand at Williamsburgh this 14th day of January 1716-
    *List of rebel prifoners imported by Capt Edwd Trafford, in the Elizabeth & Anne from Liverpole:

    THE FOLLOWING EIGHTY THREE NOT INDENTED
    Geo: Marjoribanks

    Correspondence 06/22/2004 passenger Marjoribanks Geo. Marjoribanks listed as a non-indentured [Jacobite] is our immigrant ancestor. The website for Majoribanks/Marchbanks information on this person can be found at:

    Dedicated to George Marjoribanks

    http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Acres/4730/george/george.html

    To paraphrase information from that site, George was born in Scotland and captured in a Jacobite uprising, imprisoned and then deported to the colonies. In the colonies he met and married Ann Eckols, daughter of John and Mary [Cave] Eckols. From this union there were eight children born but only seven were named in George's will, The will of George Marchbanks can be found in Will book No. 1, 1734-1761, page 11-12. It was proved 21 Nov. 1740, page 12a.in the Parish of Raleigh in Amelia County, Virginia. He left to his younger son Joseph: plantation and two hundred and seventy five acres of land, to son George two hundred seventy five acres of land next to Joseph, to son William two hundred seventy five acres of land next to George, to daughter Lucy Prisher one hundred acres of land, to daughter Ursula one hundred acres of land and to daughter Sarah one hundred acres of land. Ann, his beloved wife, and William Echols and Richard Echols were executors. Witnessed by Hiz Ford, William Clemond, Jos. Collins Numerous court records for George Marchbanks can be found in Goochland County, Virginia between 1729 and 1737. By 1740 the records switch to Amelia County, Virginia. Alice Sanders SANDERS922@msn.com

    A George Marchbanks arrived on the ship Elizabeth and Ann from Liverpool to the Colony of Virginia 14 January 1716/7. Coming to America was evidently not his choice. For more than two centuries, Stuart kings ruled Scotland. James VI became king of Scotland in 1567 when his mother, Mary, Queen of Scots, gave up the throne. When his cousin Elizabeth I died, he became King James I of England. His grandson, King James II succeeded a brother, Charles II, to the throne in 1685. James II, a Roman Catholic, favored Catholics in his policies.

    When his wife had a son in 1688, the prospect of another Catholic king united James' opponents against him. In the "Glorious Revolution" of 1688, James' Protestant daughter Mary and her husband, William of Orange, ruler of the Netherlands, became joint rulers of England. James fled to France and spent the rest of his life in exile. Yet James had his supporters too and they longed to return a Stuart to the English throne. They called themselves "Jacobites," a name they derived from the word Jacobus, "James" in Latin. Many Scots, among them the young George Marchbanks, were Jacobites, as were many Englishmen

    On 18 September 1714 a Protestant German prince, who could speak no English, arrived in England. They would crown him King George I. This infuriated the Jacobites. On 6 September 1715, the Earl of Mar called for armed reaction and ten thousand rushed to arms. The government acted at once and Parliament passed the Riot Act to curb disturbances in English towns. Lord Derwentwater rose in support of the Stuarts and raised a band of rebels in Northern England. Four thousand Scots reinforced him. Yet the Jacobite rebellion was brief. On 13 November, the English military beat Derwentwater and the same day Government forces in Scotland met Mar. This latter battle was indecisive but the Jacobites became discouraged and began to desert the cause.

    When James II's son landed in December, no hope for success remained. He could do little but evacuate the leaders of the rebellion to France. England tried many Jacobites and executed thirty. Marchbanks' reward for participating in the uprising was evidently a trip to the tobacco colonies, an honor often bestowed upon rebels and other low characters.

    George in Henrico and Amelia George Marchbanks bought 52 acres in Henrico County from Michael Camper before 1725 when Daniel Croom and his wife, Elizabeth -, relinquished her right in the land. & The next record we find for George was a grant for 350 acres in Henrico (later Goochland) County adjoining Manakin Town in 1727. George sold both tracts, along with a house, one slave, and livestock to William Chamberlayne of St. Peter's Parish in 1729. In 1735 George Marchbanks of Prince George County and his wife, Ann, appeared on the deed with Chamberlayne when he sold the 52 acres to Thomas Dickens.

    George was in St. Peter's Parish where two sons were born 1723-25. Marchbanks was evidently in Amelia County by 11 July 1735 when he registered his livestock mark at the County Clerk's Office. His was "crop and slit right ear, half crop on underside of left ear." Livestock marks helped identify free-roaming cattle and hogs.
    On 5 June 1736 Marchbanks obtained a patent for 525 acres in Amelia County on the south side of the Appomattox River next to land of Abraham Echols. This was apparently the 550 acres that Ann and George Marchbanks sold to Andrew Lester of James City County in 1746 for 125. Amelia County charged George Marchbanks and "Abram, a Negro" tithable in 1737. In 1739 he received a grant of 1,579 acres in Amelia County. This land included his early 525-acre patent and was next to that of Benjamin Hubbard, Edward Hubbard, William Hurt, and others.

    A year later, in 1740 he sold 150 acres to Joseph Collins and 200 acres to John Hampton. Hezekiah Ford , William Clement and William Echols witnessed the first deed and Richard Echols, John Gillintine and William Barkson, the second. As were most Amelia County residents, George was a tobacco planter. On 12 November 1736, John Bentley, Constable, informed the Amelia County court that George "tended seconds contrary to the law and ordered he be prosecuted and that Stephen Dewey, Deputy Attorney, commence same." George left a will in Amelia County that bequeathed his plantation and personal estate for his wife for her lifetime. He left 275 acres of land to each of his sons and 100 acres of land to each of his daughters.

    This would be 1,225 acres, approximately the 1,579-acre patent less the conveyances of 150 and 200 acres. Executors of the will were Ann Marchbanks, William Echols, and Richard Echols (will dated 27 Oct. 1740, recorded 21 Nov. 1740 ). Samuel Bentley, Benjamin Hubbard and Joseph Hubbard completed their appraisal of George's estate 28 November 1740.

    They valued it at 11:2:3. Ann (Echols) Marchbanks was in court several times as a defendant against individuals with claims against her husband's estate. Plaintiffs included Edward Booker (6:6) , Abraham Echols (24:17:9) , David Bell (1:14:10) , Thomas Dawson (4:0:10) , the estate of John Carter (dismissed). Ann Marchbanks appeared as a tithable in Amelia County in 1746 only. The Marchbanks may have been Quakers. We can find no Amelia County marriage records for Marchbanks children although some appear to have married and lived there. Further, census records of 1782 show the League family in-laws owned no slaves.



    http://www.geocities.com/Heartland/Acres/4730/george/george.html

    Abstract of Will of George Marchbanks



    Amelia County, Va. Will Book 1 page 11




    Seventh day of October, one thousand seven hundred forty, I
    George Marchbanks of the Parish of Raleigh in the county of Amelia
    lend to my wife my plantation and personal estate.

    Younger son Joseph - plantation and two hundred and seventy-five
    acres of land

    Son George Marchbanks two hundred seventy-five acres of land
    next to Joseph.

    Son William Marchbanks two hundred seventy-five acres of land
    next to George.

    Daughter Lucy Prisher one hundred acres of land

    Daughter Ursula one hundred acres

    Daughter Ann Marchbanks one hundred acres

    Daughter Sarah Marchbanks one hundred acres

    I appoint Ann Marchbanks, my well beloved wife and William Echols and
    Richard Echols to be my executors.

    Witnessed:

    Hiz Ford George Marchbanks
    William Clemond his mark
    Jos. Collins




    Marriage 1 Anne Echols b: Abt 1696 in , , Virginia
    • Married: Abt 1720
    • Change Date: 24 Nov 2011
    Children
    1. Has No Children Lucy Marshbanks b: Abt 1720
    2. Has No Children John Marshbanks b: 16 Mar 1722
    3. Has No Children Mary Ann Marshbanks b: Abt 1723
    4. Has No Children George Marshbanks b: 18 Sep 1725 in Virginia
    5. Has No Children Ursula Marshbanks b: Abt 1727 in Albemarle , Virginia
    6. Has Children William Marshbanks b: Abt 1729 in Virginia
    7. Has No Children Sarah Marshbanks b: Abt 1731
    8. Has No Children Joseph Marshbanks b: 4 Oct 1733

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