V. B. Clift Ancestry

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  • ID: I266
  • Name: Michael Cadet Young
  • Surname: Young
  • Given Name: Michael Cadet
  • Sex: M
  • Christening: 28 Mar 1694 French Hugenot Church, Threadneedle Street, London, England
  • Death: 1769 in St. Andrew's Parish, Brunswick County, Virginia
  • Ancestral File #: 3GBT-XC
  • _UID: 721E972913FAD611871C005004B09864E710
  • Note:
    Moody Family Genealogy by Grant Moody
    Will of Michael Moody Jr., Brunswick Co., VA
    History of Iredell County, NC
    Archives and TIB

    The following from the Moody Family Genealogy:
    Michael Cadet Young, born in the last part ofthe 17th century, and his half-brother William, sons of Francis Young, were also in the Battle of Blenheim. They were captured, taken as prisoners to France and with others escaped. They made their way to the South of France and thence back to England. They were from Bristol and came to America together. Michael came to Virginia and William stopped in Maryland. They were surveyors. Michael Cadet Young married Martha Saddler about 1722, resided in Brunswick County, VA and died there in 1769.

    From "The Young Family of Bristol"

    ". . .Michael and William were captured but escaped to the south of France, from whence after two years they shipped in 1706 to Bristol. It is noted that Michael Cadet Young was at Eton. . .in 1698. Later he was in business with Nathaniel Burwell who was at Eton from 1722 to 1729, and the two were factors of Robert 'King' Carter to exploiting lands granted to Lord Culpeper.

    "Michael Cadet Young. . .in 1704 he must have been about 20, as William, his younger brother, was also in the battle of Blenheim, so we can place his birth about 1684-5 with some surety. After their return from the wars, Michael and William took up their profession of surveyor. Mrs. Dalton writing 1896 says: 'Michael Cadet Young was sent by the English government to survey South Carolina.' Brunswick Order Book 1, p. 241, Michael Cadet certifies to '17 years since importation from Great Britain' on May 3, 1739. . .in 1716 the British government sent Michael Cadet Young with William his brother to survey the boundary between South and North Carolina, and the results of this survey was
    one of the contributing causes of the South Carolina 'rebellion' of 1719. In the meantime the two men return to England.

    Later, it appears that Michael Cadet Young was with Robert 'King' Carter in developing lands in Prince George County south of the James River. While in South Carolina, Michael patented the Middle Piedmont plantation which he gave to his son, Le Gros Young, as noted by Mrs. Dalton. The plantation was on the site of the present state capitol, where Le Gros 'built the first house' in what is now Columbia, S.C. and from which he went to represent that colony in 1774 to the Continental Congress. He visited the family of Thomas Young enroute to Congress.

    Between 1722 and 1730 he was doubtless employed with Wm. Byrd as his factor in developing his Roanoke river properties, which explains Michael Cadet Young's four purchases of the Roanoke river plantations before Brunswick County was formed. He therefore did land at Harrison's landing as Virginia genealogists have supposed, and in this way became well acquainted with the Byrd, Harrison,
    Eppes and Saddler families who at that time were the chief aristocrats of the James River valley plantations. He married Martha Saddler, daughter of John Saddler, Gent. and settled at "The Oaks" plantation where Crooked Run enters into the Meherrin River and which he also bought from Wm. Byrd II.

    In Brunswick County Deed Books No. 1 and 2, Michael Cadet Young's name appears
    54 times as first witness to a deed, who was the surveyor and contractor that acted as the go-between or real estate man.

    In 1747 he sold The Oaks plantation on Crooked Creek and moved to the Hals Creek property, which later became known as the Diamond Grove Plantation, about 4 miles from Lawrenceville. It is at this plantation that local tradition says that he became the first importer of thoroughbred race horses in 1744 into thecolonies. . .from 1747 to 1755 he became a planter on the grand scale as he is reported to have had 540 families of indentured servants working for him on his various properties. He did not own any slaves in his lifetime.

    In 1755 Michael Cadet Young sold Diamond Grove plantation to Peter Jones, merchant and went to live with his son, Michael Cadet Young, Jr. at his Poplar Creek plantation. This son, Michael Cadet Young, Jr., died at 22 years of age and his father continued to live there until his death in 1769 at 84 years of age. From 1760 on at 74 years of age, he seems to have progressively retired from business. He left no will and we can only assume that he divided his estate among his sons in his lifetime when he went to live with his son by his second wife, Temperance.

    ***************************************************************************************************************

    Prepared August 3, 2006, by Janice McAlpine, 2345 Oleander Street, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70806. E-mail: macalpage@cox.net. The following is Janice's research and interpretation of the documentation:

    Michael Cadet Young: bapt. 28 MAR 1694 Threadneedle Street French Huguenot, London, England, died late December 1769 or early January 1770, Poplar Creek, St. Andrews Parish, Brunswick Co., Virginia.

    According to tradition in the family of Michael Cadet Young (MCY), Michael's father was named Francis and his mother was Martha LeGros, a Huguenot refugee. Michael named his first son Francis, after his father, and named his son LeGros Young after his mother. However, no one has ever been able to find records documenting the marriage and children of a Francis Young and a Martha LeGros. There are no marriage records, no property records, no birth or baptismal records, and no wills.

    This is because Michael Cadet Young was not born a Young. Young is an Anglicized version of his original French surname, Cadet. Michael's parents actually were Huguenot refugees François/Francis Cadet and Marie Marthe LeGros. There are a number of records documenting the marriage and children of this couple, including the baptism of their son, Michael Cadet, in 1694 in London.

    The records for François/Francis Cadet and Marie Marthe LeGros include the baptismal record of Pierre Cadet, bpt. January 23, 1699, at ?La Patente? in Spittlefields, London, which identified his father as François Cadet and his mother as Marie Marthe le Gros. Marie Marthe or Mary Martha was also listed on the baptismal records of three additional children fathered by François Cadet between 1694 and 1699. François Cadet's 1712 will named his wife Mary Martha (Marie Marthe) and listed Michael Cadet as a son. Various individuals with the surname of LeGros, or variations thereof, served as witnesses to the baptisms of François' and Marie's other children, and a Michael Legros testified in the 1713 probate of François Cadet's will.

    According to virtually all on-line genealogies, however, Michael Cadet Young's father was Francis Young of Bristol, England, with a noble lineage going back to Sir Morgan Yonge in the 14th century Unfortunately, this is fiction based on the "work" of a hired genealogist in the 1930s, who manufactured a connection between Michael Cadet Young and the noble Young family of Bristol to please his patron, Walter Jorgensen Young. Walter Young repeated the noble genealogy in his 1937 book, The Young Family of Bristol. This book has been widely circulated and cited repeatedly for Michal Cadet Young's ancestry, but there is absolutely no documentation anywhere in it to connect Michael Cadet Young to the Youngs of Bristol. On the other hand, there is ample evidence to connect Michael Cadet Young to François/Francis Cadet and Marie Marthe LeGros of London.

    Baptismal Record: MICHAEL CADET bpt.: 28 MAR 1694, Threadneedle Street French Huguenot, London, England. Parents: FRANçOIS CADET and MARIE, witnessed by Jacques Cadet and Jacques le Gros. (Colyer-Fergusson, T. C., The Registers of the French Church, Threadneedle Street, London. Aberdeen, 1906, pp. 131. (The Publications of the Huguenot Society of London, XVI.) and 1600 - 1639 942.1 L1 B4H V.9 Book England, London, St. Bartholomew by the Exchange - Church records - Indexes Computer printout of London, Threadneedle Street French Huguenot, Lond., Eng LDS 6903811 Number of Fiche: 6.) (Originals of Registers at Guildhall Library London)

    In 3 May 1739, Michael Cadet Young stated that he was approaching 50 years old. (Brunswick County, Virginia. Deeds & Wills, 1725-1737, p. 241.) If he were 48 or 49 in 1739, he would have had a birth year of 1690/1691, rather than a birth year of 1694. It is possible that Michael was baptized late, but this does not seem likely. Judging from other contemporaneous Threadneedle baptismal records, which include dates of birth as well as dates of baptism, children in the Huguenot community were usually baptized within a week or two after birth. I think it is much more likely that Michael was simply off a few years on his age.

    For what it is worth, according to Young family lore, Michael Cadet Young was 37 when he married a 17 year-old wife. If MCY was born in March of 1694, as his baptismal record suggests, he would have been 37 in 1731. This fits pretty well with with MCY?s marriage to Temperance about 1730 and the birth of their first child Francis in October of 1731. (The Vestry Book and Register of Bristol Parish, Virginia, 1720-1789, transcribed and published by Churchill Gibson Chamberlayne. Richmond, Va. 1898.)

    Walter Jorgensen Young's book, "The Young Family of Bristol" (1937), said that MCY was born 1684, St. James, Clerkenwell, London, the son of Francis Young and Martha LeGros of Bristol, England. Walter Young did not provide documentation for this information, and, as far as I can tell, there is none. Michael Cadet Young is not listed anywhere in the birth registers of St. James, Clerkenwell, even though they exist for the period in question. (City of London Metropolitan Archives. London Generations database SAINT JAMES, CLERKENWELL, CLERKENWELL GREEN, ISLINGTON. Composite register: bapt Aug 1673 - Mar 1711, marr Aug 1670 - Mar 1692, bur Apr 1670 - Mar 1711: X097/356 - index X102/029; X102/030; X102/032;X10. Also available through LDS: London Metro. Archives call no.: P76/JSI/001-009, 023-029, 031, 064, 171-173, 175-182.)

    MCY?s father, François Cadet, died December 28, 1712, in the Parish of St. Mary Magdalen, Bermondsey, Surrey, England. François Cadet?s will was probated in 1713. (Prerogative Court of Canterbury Wills, 1 Leeds 531-545.) Jacque Cadet l?aine (aka James Cadet Sr.) and Michael LeGros testified when the will was probated. François Cadet left half of his modest estate to his wife Mary Martha and half to his three sons, Francis, Michael and Benjamin. Judging from the way the will was drafted, it appears that the three sons were unmarried and probably under-age in 1713.

    On 3 May 1739, Michael Cadet Young testified that it was ?now Seventeen years since his ?Importation from Great Brittain [sic]. . . .? (Brunswick County, Virginia. Deeds & Wills, 1725-1737, p. 241.) This means that he arrived in Virginia about 1722. Listed in the 3 May 1739 record with Michael Cadet Young were a number of other individuals also testified about their importations. Some were fairly recent, and others many years previous. The individuals who testified included John Stevens, John Scott, John Jackson, Cornelius Keith, Marmaduke Johnson, Henry Morris, William Eaton, Patrick Dempsey and Thomas Avent. (Brunswick County, Virginia. Deeds & Wills, 1725-1737, p. 241-243)

    Michael Cadet Young and these same nine individuals were also listed in the "Virginia Patent Book", vol. 18:531 which showed a grant of acreage to Clement Reade dated 12 Mar 1739/40 for the "... Importation of 10 persons to dwell in Virginia whose names are John Stevens, John Scott, John Jackson, Cornelius Keith, Marmaduke Johnson, Michael Cadet Young, Henry Morris, William Eaton, Patrick Dempsey and Thomas Avent..."

    Under Virginia law, an individual who paid the transportation costs of an immigrant to Virginia received 50 acres of land for each immigrant he imported into the colony. Although some individuals received land grants for importing family members, most grants were for the importation of indentured servants.

    ?Virginia planters who imported their labor were awarded 50 acres per indentured servant. The headright claims for the indentured servants listed the names of the individuals imported. Headrights were not always claimed immediately after immigration. There are instances in which several years elapsed between a person's entry into Virginia and the acquisition of a headright and sometimes even longer between then and the patenting of a tract of land.? (Library of Virginia, "Headrights," VA-NOTES, <http://www.lva.lib.va.us/whatwehave/local/va4_headrights.htm> (accessed July 26, 2006.))

    Many, if not most, immigrants came to the colonies as indentured servant. ?In exchange for their service, the indentured servants received their passage paid from England, as well as food, clothing, and shelter once they arrived in the colonies. Some were even paid a salary.? (Ekirch, A. Roger. "Bound for America," in The William & Mary Quarterly, 3d. series, 42(April 1985): 167-83.)

    Judging from the record, Michael Cadet Young arrived in Virginia in 1722, probably as an indentured servant. At a minimum, the grant of land to Clement Reade tells us that Michael Cadet Young did not pay his own passage and undoubtedly had to work-off the cost of his transportation to Virginia. [Caveat: Robert Young Clay says that MCY paid his own passage, but Robert Young Clay did not discuss, and might not have been aware of, the record showing a grant of acreage to Clement Reade for importing Michael Cadet Young.]

    Although many low-skilled laborers received no salary for their work and were poorly treated as indentured servants, skilled workers were often able to negotiate reasonable employment contracts before they left England. Some of these contracts included a grant of land at the end of the indenture or an agreement that the servant would be entitled to claim the importation headright. (David W. Galson; White Servitude in Colonial America: An Economic Analysis. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 1981.)

    As far as I can tell, there is no record of Michael Cadet Young from 1722 to 1725 when he appeared on the 1725 tithables lists in Henrico County, Virginia. He was listed as ?Michel le June? or Le Jeune. (The Vestry Book of King William Parish, Virginia, 1707-1750. Manakin Episcopal Church, Midlothian, Virginia, 1966. p. 256. )

    On May 2, 1726, Michael Cadet Young witnessed the will of Pierre Dutoit/Dutoy of Henrico County. He signed his name as M?l c Young. (Henrico County, Virginia. Miscellaneous Records (loose papers - original), Vol. 2 pp. 659-661.) Michael Cadet Young?s signature was very distinctive throughout his time in Virginia. He elongated the tail of the ?g? in Young and ran it back under his full name adding curls and other flourishes. His signature on Pierre Dutoit/Dutoy?s 1726 will contained the fancy-work ?g? that appeared on later documents.

    Pierre Dutoit was a Huguenot immigrant. (Register of Qualified Huguenot Ancestors of the Huguenot Society, 4th Ed., Finnell, Arthur Louis: 1995, p. 86.) The other witnesses to his will, Jean Jouany, Jean Piere Bilbou and Antoine Bennis, were also Huguenot. (List of Manakintowne Huguenot Settlers, published in The Huguenot, 1933, F. Batisse; Turff & Twigg: The French Lands, Volume I. Cabell, Priscilla Harriss. Richmond, VA: Carter Printing Company, 1988; The Virginia Genealogist - Volume 7: Jean Jouany, as American as John Jones.)

    In 1726, Barbara Dutoy, widow of Pierre Dutoit, appeared on the tithable lists for King William Parish, Henrico County. ?White women were not tithable, but they occasionally appeared on the tax lists if, as widows or spinsters, they were responsible for paying the tithes of sons, slaves, or employees.? ("What Genealogists should know about 18th Century Virginia Law", John P. Alcock, November 17, 1999, Library of Virginia, <http://home.hiwaay.net/~woliver/Virginia_Law.html>) A ?Michel Yons? appeared in household of Barbara Dutoy. Also in the household were Jean Pierre Bilbau and Antoinne Benin. (The Vestry Book of King William Parish, Virginia, 1707-1750. Manakin Episcopal Church, Midlothian, Virginia, 1966. p. 371. )

    According to Robert Young Clay, senior genealogy researcher for the Library of Virginia, ?Yons is a fairly standard spelling for the name Young as pronounced with a French accent and the name so appears in many French Huguenot records.? (Select Virginia Huguenot Resources in the Library of Virginia, Call Number: 32204, copy in my paper file.) Given his connection to the Dutoit family, I am sure ?Michel Yons? was Michael Cadet Young, who was an employee or indentured servant in the Dutoit household.

    On August 3, 1728, as ?Michael Young,? he witnessed a deed in Henrico County from Robert Mann to Thomas Mann. Other witnesses were Mark Moor and George Hunt Moore. (Henrico County, Virginia. Deeds & Wills, 1725-1737, pp. 195-196.) On the 1st Monday in October, 1729, he witnessed a deed from Godfrey Fowler, Sr., and Godfrey Fowler, Jr., to William Dunavant in Henrico County. Other witnesses were Gilbert Morry and Philip Dunavant. His signature on the deed is ?M? C. Young? and it bears the same flourish as his signature on the will of Pierre Dutoit. (Henrico County, Virginia. Deeds & Wills, 1725-1737, pp. 351-352)

    At some point, Michael apparently changed his French name, Cadet, to the English equivalent, Young. This was typical of Huguenots who assimilated into English society and Anglicized their family names. For example the name Dubois became Woods and Roussel became the English Russell. (Eglise Protestante Française de Londres <http://www.egliseprotestantelondres.org/histoire3.php>)

    It is not clear whether Michael Cadet Young changed his name from Cadet to Young in England or Virginia, but, starting about 1729 in Virginia, he seems to have had ?second thoughts? about the name ?Young,? and started using both Cadet and Young. From that point on, most of his signatures are either M. Cadet Young or Michael Cadet Young. His sons, Francis, Thomas, Michael, and LeGros, all used the double surname, Cadet Young, while their father was alive, but all appear to have dropped the Cadet when their father died. (Robert Young Clay, Select Virginia Huguenot Resources in the Library of Virginia, Call Number: 32204, copy in my paper file.)

    Generally speaking, an indentured servant could not marry or have children during the term of his indenture. (Ekirch, A. Roger. "Bound for America," The William & Mary Quarterly, 3d. series, 42 (April 1985): 167-83.) This may explain why MCY?s first son, Francis Cadet Young, was not born until 25 October 1731. (The Vestry Book and Register of Bristol Parish, Virginia, 1720-1789, transcribed and published by Churchill Gibson Chamberlayne. Richmond, Va. 1898.) If Michael Cadet Young had been an indentured servant under a 7 year contract, his contract would have terminated in 1729. He could then have married in 1730 and had his first child in 1731.

    Michael Cadet Young married Temperance (last name unknown) about 1730, probably in Henrico County, Virginia, or in the part of Prince George County, that became Brunswick County, Virginia. Temperance is the only wife of whom we have any record. Temperance was listed as Francis Cadet Young?s mother in his 1731 birth record. (The Vestry Book and Register of Bristol Parish, Virginia, 1720-1789, transcribed and published by Churchill Gibson Chamberlayne. Richmond, Va. 1898.) In a Brunswick Co., Virginia, deed dated 25 November 1755, Temperance Young relinquished her dower rights in land transferred by Michael Cadet Young Sr. to Buckner Stith. (Brunswick Co. Deed Book 5, p. 744; and Order Book 5, p. 503.) Michael Cadet Young, Jr.'s, 1762 will listed Temperance as ?my mother Temperance Young.? (Brunswick Co.,Virginia, Will Book 4, pt.2,198-(278) Will of Michael Young Jr. of St. Andrew's Parish 5 Feb. 1762, probate 22 March 1762.) There is absolutely no evidence that Michael Cadet Young married before about 1730 or that his wife was named Martha.

    Michael Cadet Young and his wife Temperance had at least 7 documented children:
    1. Francis Cadet Young, whose birth October 25. 1731, is recorded in the Bristol Parish Register. He married Elizabeth Bennett and died 1794, in Isle of Wight County, Virginia. He was Clerk of Court of that county and his family held the clerkship for may years. (More in his separate file.)

    2. Thomas Cadet Young, b. 30 Sep 1732, probably Brunswick County, Virginia. He moved first to Lunenburg County, Virginia, and then to what is now Iredell County, North Carolina. He married 1st Judith Johnson or Johnston and 2nd Lucy Ragsdale. His relationship to Michael Cadet Young is well documented through several letters from Michael Cadet Young to Thomas. (More in his separate file.)

    3. Michael Cadet Young, Jr., who died in Brunswick County, Virginia, before March 22, 1762, when his will was recorded. He married Lucy (last name unknown). His will mentions his parents and his wife Lucy. Various printed and internet sources state that his widow was Lucy Ragsdale, the second wife of Thomas Cadet Jr. I have not found anything to support this, but it is possible. (More in his separate file.)

    4. LeGros Cadet Young, b. 1734/1740. He died February or March, 1787, at the Congarees, Camden District, Richland County, South Carolina. LeGros married Mary McGrew in South Carolina, date unknown. She died in 1783. They had at least two children, David and Isabella, both of whom died by 1790. LeGros is mentioned as a son in at least one letter written by Michael Cadet Young. In addition, there are two letters written by LeGros Young to his brother Thomas. (More in his separate file.)

    5. John Young, b. abt. 1745, Brunswick Co., Virginia. He was mentioned in a letter his father wrote to Thomas Cadet Young dated February 1, 1767. John was also mentioned as ?your brother John? in a February 1789 letter from James and Mary Gee to Thomas Cadet and Lucy Young. In addition, there is a December 10, 1792, letter written by John Young to Thomas Cadet Young in which he referred to Thomas as ?Brother Thomas.? John Young married Elizabeth Andrews, daughter of Ephraim Andrews. Because their oldest surviving child, William, was born 25 Mar 1783, I assume John and Elizabeth married about 1781/1782. (More in his separate file.)

    6. Martha Young, who was mentioned in a lawsuit in Lunenburg County, Virginia. Michael Cadet Young also referred to ?your sister? in two 1768 letters to Thomas Cadet Young. The sister was unmarried at the time the letters were written. Unfortunately, the name of the sister is not mentioned. A Martha Young married Samuel Bugg of Mecklenburg Co., Virginia, abt. 1769/1770. She was listed as Martha Bugg in his Dec. 24, 1775, will. I do not know if Martha Young Bugg was Michael Cadet Young?s daughter, but the possibility is worth exploring. (More in her separate file.)

    7. William Young b. abt 1745, Brunswick Co., Virginia. He is referred to as ?brother Billey? in a letter dated December 12, 1792, from John Young to Thomas Cadet Young. I believe William was born in the 1740s and was on the1810 and 1820 census in Campbell Co., Virginia. His wife?s name is unknown, but at least two of his daughters had ?Hubbard? as their middle names. He was not the William Young who married Patience Sinclair. (More in his separate file.)

    Published sources claim there were also sons named James, Henry and Benjamin. There was a James Young in Brunswick Co. who witnessed deeds in 1773 and 1790, but I have not been able to connect him to Michael Cadet Young. For what it is worth, MCY had an uncle Jacque/James Cadet. I have not found anything one way or the other about alleged sons Henry and Benjamin. However, Michael Cadet Young did have a brother named Benjamin.

    After the birth of Francis Cadet Young in 1731, the next record we have of Michael Cadet Young is in Brunswick County, Virginia, on 31 July 1734, when he witnessed a deed for George King. (Early Settlers of Mecklenburg Co, Virginia, p. 78.) However, it appears that he purchased land in Brunswick County from Thomas Wilson at some point prior to May 1732, because the deed is mentioned in 1735 as one of 52 that had not been recorded. (Brunswick Co. Virginia 1735, July 3. Land Record. Source Brunswick Order Book 1 page 99, entry of 52 deeds on 3 July 1735. Full text below.)

    Brunswick Co., Virginia, was formed in 1720 from Prince George County, Virginia, but, because of the sparse population, a county government was not organized until 1732. <http://www.rootsweb.com/~vabrunsw/> According to Early Settlers of Mecklenburg Co, Virginia, ?When Brunswick Co. was first cut from Prince George Co. in 1720, jurisdiction was to remain in the Court of Prince George Co. until a government for the county was organized. .... The first meeting of a court for Brunswick was not held until 2 May 1732. It is assumed that deeds, wills and other documents were recorded in Prince George Co. prior to the meeting of the first court in 1732. It is believed that some of these deeds recorded during this period were lost because of the entry below. At a later date, someone in the Clerk's Office wrote on the margin of this page '52 deeds apparently not recorded'."

    A deed from Thomas Wilson to Michael Cadet Young was one of the 52 deeds not recorded: Brunswick Co. Virginia 1735, July 3. Land Record. Source Brunswick Order Book 1 page 99, entry of 52 deeds on 3 July 1735. "Thomas Wilson came into Court & presented & acknowledged deeds of lease & release to Mason Bishop, MICHAEL C. YOUNG, James Rigby, Richard Ramsey, Charles Golstone, John Fountain, Robert Andrews, Henry Beverly, John Merritt, Samuel Crawley, John Adcock, Henry Morris, Samuel Manning, John Blackstone, Richard York, Thomas Couch Jr., Benjamin Boing, Wm. Couch, James Couch, John Barnes, John Thomason, Richard Watts, Patrick Dorum, Seth Pettypool, Thomas Shelton, John Wilson, Philip Morgan, John Thomason Jr., James Dockery, Thomas Rawlins, William Douglas, James Arnold, Matthew Creed, Aaron Johnson, John Humphries, Henry Rottenberry Jr., Wm Fletcher, Thomas Robertson, Aaron Pinson, Joseph Coleson, Robert Alen, Francis Rayney, Joseph Dunman,Thomas Haney, John Mealey, Wm. Pennington, Henry Rottenbury Senr., and William Manning, which at the motion of the said Mason Bishop, MICHAEL CADET YOUNG and all if the aforenamed persons they are ordered to be recorded."

    Family lore says that Michael Cadet Young was a surveyor. I have not found any evidence of this, but early Virginia surveys were apparently discarded after a few years and are no longer in the records. (The Virginia Land Office (Research Notes Number 20) < http://www.lva.lib.va.us/whatwehave/land/rn20_landoffice.htm>) Michael Cadet Young witnesses a far number of land transactions in Brunswick County. Because he was quite literate, it is possible that he drafted the transfer documents and then witnessed the signings.

    In the 1740s, MCY was on the poll lists in Brunswick County:
    Brunswick County, Virginia Deed Book 3 (1744-1749) Page 513, 515
    Pole for Drury Stith--Michael Young [among a long list of others]
    Pole for Sterling Clack--Michael Young [among a long list of others]

    In his 1937 book, The Young Family of Bristol, Walter J. Young portrayed Michael Cadet Young as part of the landed Virginia aristocracy with vast land holdings in Virginia and South Carolina. This doesn?t seem to be accurate. Although Michael Cadet Young did own land, the extent of his holdings was greatly exaggerated by Walter Young.

    For example, there is no record of Michael Cadet Young ever having owned land in South Carolina. Pre-1785 land records in South Carolina were not kept at the county level. They were centralized in Charleston. As a result, they were not burned during the Civil War. Because records from the period, 1720-1785, are extant, with the originals in Charleston, microfilm copies in the South Carolina Department of Archives and History (Columbia), this means that Michael Cadet Young did not own land in South Carolina. (There also are no records of any significance for his son LeGros Young, who lived in South Carolina.)

    Walter Young also inflated Michael Cadet Young?s landholdings in Virginia by, among other things, listing property that MCY had patented or purchased with partners Drury Stith and Henry Morris as if the property had been solely owned by MCY. Without having a copy of their partnership agreement it is impossible to know what share Michael Cadet Young had in the property he acquired with Stith and Morris, but he certainly wasn?t the sole owner.

    We do know that Michael Cadet Young owned at least 684 acres in Brunswick County by 26 Apr 1743, when he sold the property ?where Young now lives? to J. Parish under a mortgage. (Brunswick Co. Deed Book 2, 618(355) 26 Apr 1743.) It is reasonable to assume that MCY either owned other land at the time of the sale or purchased other land shortly thereafter because his property was mentioned in October of 1743, as a boundary-line for other property in Brunswick County. (Extracts From Drury Stith?s Entry Record Book. 1737-1770, Chiarito, Marian Dodson. p.10: 28 Oct 1743 Wm Macby enters 400 acres both sides Midway adj Mich. Youngs upper line. Transferred to James & Mathias Macby. )

    I have records of land transactions from about 1736 through November of 1755 involving Michael Cadet Young -- sometimes in his individual capacity and sometimes in partnership with Stith and Morris. Rather than reciting the transactions here, I have listed them in rough chronological order later in these notes. There are clearly gaps in the records I have, but I suspect that the missing records reflect relatively modest land transactions.

    The overall picture the land records present to me is one of a comfortable middleclass farmer with enough extra to engage in a bit of land speculation on the side. He certainly wasn?t a member of Virginia?s landed gentry. The more interesting question is, ?What happened in the 1750s to bankrupt Michael Cadet Young??

    We know from his personal letters that MCY was destitute in 1767, owning nothing except "a mare, saddle and cart." (1 February 1767, letter.) His situation was also clear from his letter of December 1769 in which he chastised Thomas Cadet Young for failing to visit, stating that Thomas ? undoubtedly would have [visited] if I had an estate to leave behind me, but as I have nothing, I am dispised [sic] and forgot.? MCY also pleaded with Thomas to collect a small debt owed to him by Mr. Hudgins, ?Inclosed [sic] is a letter to Mr. Hudgin which [I] beg you?ll give to him, it is to demand ten shillings of him at once for he owes me twenty more which is thirty in all and if it suits him to pay the whole I shall be glad to receive it, if not, ten will suffice for the present for I am in great need of that quantity of money and can?t tell what to do without it.? (Originals of letters in the Manuscripts Department Library of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill SOUTHERN HISTORICAL COLLECTION #3242 MARY HUNTER KENNEDY PAPERS (Kennedy Collection). Copies of originals in my paper file.)

    I think something happened to MCY in the 1750s that wiped him out financially. We know from his letters that there was court action against him, probably in the mid-1750s that resulted in a judgment against him. In his February 1, 1767, letter, MCY wrote to Thomas, "I expect now a prosecution against me daily for a debt which I thought I had clear of and was accepted in Col. Stith?s hands, but contrary to that, I was served with a Scire Facias to renew the judgment." (Letter in Kennedy collection and paper file.)

    A judgment debt expires after a certain period -- often 6 to 12 years -- unless a court action is brought to renew the judgment. In the old days, a scire facias was one way to renew a judgment. The fact that a scire facias was being brought against MCY in 1767 seems to indicate that a judgment had been entered against him in the 1750s and that the last payment on the judgment had been about 1755/1757. (I believe colonial Virginia used a 10 or 12 year period.) In addition, the underlying judgment probably was substantial, perhaps having to do with a land deal or mortgage, otherwise it would not have been worth the time and expense to file and prosecute the scire facias.

    The last land transaction involving Michael Cadet Young seems to have been in 1755 when he transferred land to Buckner Stith. (General Index to Deeds. Vol. A. 1732-1881. Brunswick County, Virginia, 555: Buckner Stith From Michael Cadet Young &C Deed 1755 5-744). In November of 1755 Temperance Young released her dower rights in land transferred by MCY to Buckner Stith. This was probably in the same land. (Brunswick Co. Deed Book 5, p. 744; and Order Book 5, p. 503. 25 November 1755.)

    In 1756, MCY also sold his personal belongings. (Brunswick County Deed book 6 56-(88), 58 (90), 28 Feb and l Mar 1756.) This is highly unusual and is another indication that Michael Cadet Young was in dire financial straits by the mid-1750s.

    I don?t know where Michael Cadet Young was or what he did from 1755 to about 1760. I am pretty sure that MCY and Temperance had several children still living with them -- probably John, Martha, William and perhaps Michael Jr., and James. Their oldest sons Francis and Thomas, were in their mid-twenties and newly married. It is possible that MCY and family lived with one of them.

    MCY?s son Thomas was working as a factor for John Bennett in Lunenburg County as late as 1767 (letter in Kennedy Collection and paper file), so it is reasonable to believe that Michael Cadet Young might have worked in a similar capacity for a large landowner in the area. Despite his financial difficulties, MCY was highly literate and undoubtedly an experienced manager. As a factor or plantation manager, MCY would have been provided descent living quarters his family.

    In 1760, MCY?s son, Michael Cadet Young, Jr., bought a small farm ?adjoining Little Creek? in Brunswick County: Brunswick County, Virginia, Deed Book 6, page 505: Indenture made the 25th day of April, 1760, between Samuel WIGGEN and Michal YOUNG, Junior, for 16 pounds, conveying 150 acres, adjoining Little Creek and land of James HARWILL, and being same land granted to Marmaduke Daniel on May 19, 1757. Witnesses were Allen LOVE, Randall BRACEY, and Thomas SINGLETON. Indenture proved by the oaths of the witnesses in Court on April 28, 1760.

    It appears that MCY and Temperance moved in with Michael Cadet Jr. and his wife Lucy about 1760, because Michael Cadet Young, Jr.?s, 1762 will left his parents and wife Lucy a life estate in the property. (Brunswick Co., Virginia, Will Book 4, pt.2 198-(278) Will of Michaiel [sic] Young Jr. of St. Andrew's Parish 5 Feb. 1762, probate 22 March 1762.) This is probably where MCY spent the last 9 years of his life.

    On 30 Nov 1760, MCY witnessed the will of Amy Gilliam and proved it in court on 28 March 1763. (Brunswick Will Book 4, pt.2, 227 (323) Will of Amy Gilliam 30 Nov 1760, 28 March 1763. Witnessed by Mychaile Cadle [sic] Young, Mary Vaughn, William Vaughn. Proved by Michaiel Cadle [sic] Young , 28 March 1763.) Amy Gilliam appears to have been the widow of James Gilliam. I don?t know what, if any, connection the Gilliam?s had to MCY.

    On September 9, 1761, MCY witnessed a deed between Richard Vaughan, the Younger, and John Westmoreland (Brunswick Co. Deed Book 7, Page 16.)

    Michael and two of his sons were on the Poll Lists in Brunswick Co. for 1768
    Brunswick Co., Deed Book 9, pp. 279-83: Poll 2 December 1768.
    Young Francis
    Young Michael Cadet
    Young Thomas

    The last dated MCY letter in the Kennedy Collection is from December 22, 1769. In that letter MCY wrote to his son Thomas about his impending death, ?I feel the lamp of life decaying every day; my breath grows shorter and shorter, so that I can?t sport myself the least as can be, not even walk but with great difficulty for the want of breath.? There is another undated letter, clearly from the same period, and, I believe, written shortly after the December 22, 1769, letter. In this final letter, MCY asks Thomas to promise ?that you will take good care of your poor indigent mother and suffer her not to want in her old age. . . .? (Letters in Kennedy Collection and my paper file.)

    When he died in late December 1769 or perhaps early January 1770, Michael Cadet Young had no estate to probate. According to Walter J. Young, this was because MCY had transferred his vast estate to his sons, Michael Jr., Thomas, LeGros, and Francis, before his death. This is not supported by the record. There is nothing to show that MCY ever transferred anything to his sons and none of them was especially well off during the years before MCY?s death.

    Michael Cadet Young, Jr., owned 150 acres when he died in 1762. This was land he had purchased in 1760. (Brunswick Co., Virginia, Will Book 4, pt.2 198-(278); and Brunswick County, Virginia, Deed Book 6, page 505) Thomas Cadet Young was employed as a factor for John Bennett in 1769 and owned a total of 350 acres and one. (Kennedy Collection: undated MCY letter, 1769 will of Thomas Cadet Young, copies in my paper file.) Thomas had purchased the land in November, 1761, from John Pilkinton. (Brunswick County Deed Book 7, Page 47.) LeGros Young left a minimal estate when he died intestate in 1787. (Camden District, S.C., wills and administration, 1781-1787, Brent Holcomb, Elmer Parker, 1978, p. 67: Young, LeGros At. 76, Pck 2712.) Francis Cadet Young?s first land purchase was 50 acres from his father-in-law James Bennett in February of 1761 and his subsequent land purchases were modest and do not appear to have any connection with his father. (Brunswick County Deed Book 6, page 619; Deed Book 4, Page 205; Deed Book 7, Page 109; and Deed Book 8 page 125.)


    MCY Land Records:
    The following are land records in which Michael Cadet Young was listed as something other than a witness. In some he was a seller, in others a purchaser and in some his land was mentioned to locate identify boundary lines of the property being transferred:

    Brunswick Co Book 1 p. 306: William Toms of Brunswick Co., to Michael Cadet Young of the same County . . . 125 acres . . . on the north side of the Roanoke River . . . adjoining Thomas Robertson & Philip Morgan . . . part of a patent for 534 acres granted to John Davis. Witness John Parker, Henry Crackendale, James Riggby /s/ William Toms. Signed and recorded 3 March 1736. (Source: Early settlers of Mecklenburg County, Virginia. p. 83.)

    Virginia Patent Book No. 18, p. 986: Michael Cadet Young 171acres Brunswick Co. S side Sturgeon Run and on both sides Hall's Br. adj. Embry & Davis 1 June 1741 (Cavaliers & Pioneers Vol. IV p. 44; and Brunswick Deeds, citing VPB 19:986 <http://users.rcn.com/deeds/Brunswck.txt> )

    Brunswick Co. Deed Book 2, 618(355) MC Young sold to J. Parish 684 acres, where Young now lives. Mortgage for 684 acres. 26 Apr 1743.

    Extracts From Drury Stith?s Entry Record Book. 1737-1770, Chiarito, Marian Dodson. ?This book list land entries in the western portion of the original Brunswick County - what is today Halifax, Pittsylvania, Henry, Franklin & Patrick. These counties were formed from Lunenburg which was separated from Brunswick in 1746. These are entries - statement of intentions to purchase.?

    p.10 28 Oct 1743 Wm Macby enters 400 acres both sides Midway adj Mich. Youngs upper line. Transferred to James & Mathias Macby.

    p.34 27 Nov 1746 William Macby entered 200 acres of Land West side of Birches Creek joyning Michael Cadet Young and James & Matthias Macby, to be alter'd. Survd. [See first entry for William Macby]

    Virginia Patent Book 28, p. 230: 1 October 1747 Drury Stith, Henry Morris & Michael Cadet Young 412 acs. Brunswick Co. on the Ridge bet. Little Bluestone and the Middle Fork. beg. near a pond. £2 5 shillings. (source: Cavaliers and Pioneers Vol. V, p 321.)

    Virginia Patent Book 28, p. 233: 1 October 1747 Drury Stith, Henry Morris & Michael Cadet Young 637 acs. Brunswick Co. on both sides of Bluestone Cr. just above the Middle Fork, adj. Byrd £3 5 shillings. (source: Cavaliers and Pioneers Vol. V, p 322.)

    On 10 Nov 1748 the Council of VA ordered that John Stovall have a patent on Couch's Creek, Lunenburg Co. Virginia, as assignee of Nicholas [sic Michael??] Cadet Young. [My note: the transcription says Nicholas, but I think it is a misreading of Michael.] (Transcription at <http://www.sylcox.com/ged/html/notes.html>)

    Lunenburg Co. VA Deeds 1746-1752 Pg. 28. (463) Sep 26, 1749 from Drury Stith, Henry Morris, & MICHAEL CADET YOUNG of Brunswick Co and Parish of St. Andrew to John Thompson of L and Parish of Cumberland, 44L about 637 acres on both sides of Blewstone Creek being the same land that was formerly patented to Stith, Morris, & Young on Oct 1, 1747, & bounded by Byrd's line. S/Drury Stith, Henry Morris, M. CADET YOUNG. Wit. James Parrish, John O Murphey, John (+) Humphris. Recor. Oct 3, 1749.

    VA Land Patent
    5 Jul 1751 Patent Book 30, p.479-80
    To William Macbee, 800 acres in county of Lunenburgh on both sides Medway River [later Birches Creek]. Begin Umphrey's corner beech on Michael Cadet Young's line (source: Cavaliers and Pioneers Vol. VI, p 65.)

    Indenture made the 1st day of April, 1752, between Thomas SADLER and Rebecca, his wife, and Buckner STITH for 40 pounds, conveying 118 acres on South side of Sturgeon Run and part of a larger tract granted to MICHAEL CADET YOUNG by Letters of Patent bearing date of June 1, 1741 and conveyed by M. Cadet YOUNG to Thomas SADLER by Deed of Gift. Witnesses were Francis Cadet YOUNG, Richard UNDSON and MICHAEL CADET YOUNG, Jr. Presented in Court on June 21, 1752. Deed Book 5, page 233.

    Virginia Patent Book 30, p. 346: 6 August 1753 Drury Stith, Henry Morris & Michael Cadet Young 3,070 acs. Lunenburg Co. on both sides of Grassey Cr. on White Lick Br. and Beaver Pound Br. £15 5 shillings. (source: Cavaliers and Pioneers Vol. VI, p 85.)

    Indenture made the 17th day of June, 1755, between MICHAEL CADET YOUNG and THEOPHILUS FEILD of Prince George County and BUCKNER STITH, for 20 pounds, conveying 53 acres on South side of Hals Branch. Witnesses were THOMAS CADET YOUNG, NICHOLAS EDMUNDS, and TIMOTHY WARD. Presented in Court on June 24, 1755. Deed Book 5, page 744, Brunswick County, Virginia.

    General Index to Deeds. Vol. A. 1732-1881. Brunswick County, Virginia
    555 Buckner Stith Fr Michael Cadet Young &C Deed 1755 5-744

    "Record of acknowlegment by T. Field (spelled ffeild here) that he has received from Buckner Stith an assignment of George and Robert Austin's n (?) bond to him dated 9 April, 1755, whereon is due 63 pounds, 17s and 1d. which said money is received on a mortgage made ...... since contracted by Michael Cadet Young to Theophilus Field the 27 March, 1753. On a tract of land in Brunswick County containing 882 acres ... dated 17 June, 1755, and recorded 24 June, 1755." (<stith.packent.com/aunt_estie/letters/19610221.html>)

    Brunswick Co. Deed Book 5, p. 744; and Order Book 5, p. 503. 25 November 1755, Temperance Young relinquished her dower rights in land transferred by Michael Cadet Young Sr. to Buckner Stith.

    * * * *
    Other Brunswick County Records Concerning MCY: Starting in about 1735, Michael Cadet Young witnessed a number of deeds and wills and was mentioned in other documents:

    Early Settlers of Mecklenburg Co, Virginia,
    p. 78: Michael Cadet Young witnessed George King deed 31 July 1734

    BRUNSWICK COUNTY, VIRGINIA - WILL AND DEED BOOK 1
    P. 178-180 June 1735; William Toms of St. Andrews Parish, Brunswick County, to John Clements of same; lease and release; 277 acres on the north side of Roanoke River; on Gabriel Harrison's line on the river; to Philip Morgan's line. Wit: MICHAEL CADET YOUNG, Nicholas Edmunds. 5 June 1735; acknowledged by William Toms.

    Indenture made the 7th day of April, 1737, between William WALTERS of St. Andrews Parish and Drury STITH, Gentleman, for 20 pounds, conveying 240 acres on South side of Maherrin River. Witnesses were M. CADET YOUNG, Willm. JONES, and Canduis CARGILL.(might that be Cornelius?? Cargill?) Presented in Court and acknowledged on April 7, 1737. Deeds and Wills Book 1, page 313.

    Deed Book 1, page 526: Indenture made the 7th day of June, 1738, between Thomas LOYD, Sr., of St. Andrews Parish and Drury STITH, Gentleman, for 50 pounds, conveying 283 acres on lower side of Sturgeon Run on the South side of Nottoway River. Witnesses were James PARRISH and M. CADET YOUNG. Presented in Court and acknowledged on June 7,1739.

    Brunswick County, Virginia Will Book 2, pages 14, 15: Will of Richard Massey 1 Feb 1739 Proven 5 June 1740 Witnesses: Michael Cadet Young Phillip P. Jones Seth Petty Poole proved by The oaths of Michael Cadet Young, Phillip Jones and Seth Petty Poole.


    Deed Book 1, page 530: Indenture made the 2nd day of August, 1739, between Thomas Couch, Sr., Thomas Couch, Jr., and Drury Stith, Gentleman, for 30 pounds, conveying 566 acres on the Pine Lick Branch (John Stroud's corner, Thomas Lloyd's line, Talbott's line, Morris's corner), same being granted to the said Thomas Couch, Sr., by Letters of Patent at Williamsburgh, 1720. Witnesses were M. CADET YOUNG and William Edwards. Presented in Court and acknowledged on August 2, 1739.
    Brunswick County VA Deeds, Deed Book 1, page 530: Indenture made the 2nd day of August, 1739, between Thomas COUCH, Sr., Thomas COUCH, Jr., and Drury STITH, Gentleman, for 30 pounds, conveying 566 acres on the Pine Lick Branch (John STROUD'S corner, Thomas LLOYD'S line, TALBOTT'S line, MORRIS'S corner), same being granted to the said Thomas COUCH, Sr., by Letters of Patent at Williamsburgh, 1720. Witnesses were M. CADET YOUNG and William EDWARDS. Presented in Court and acknowledged on August 2, 1739.

    Deed Book 2, page 51: Indenture made the 5th day of March, 1740, between John STROUD, of St. Andrews Parish, Planter, and Drury STITH, Gent. of St. Andrews Parish, for 20 pounds, conveying 196 acres on North side of Sturgeon Run, being part of a larger tract formerly granted to: John STROUD, Sr., and bequeathed to his son, John STROUD. Witnesses were M. CADET YOUNG, Ralph DUNKLEY, and Matthew MAYO. Acknowledged in Court on March 5, 1740, at which time, Jane STROUD, wife of the said John STROUD, appeared and relinquished her dower interest..

    Deed Book 2, page ___: Indenture made the 7th day of August, 1740, between John COOKE and Nathaniel COOKE and Samuel HARWELL, for 20 pounds, conveying 286 acre tract on South side of Stony Hill Run. Witnesses were M. CADET YOUNG and John STROUD. Acknowledged in Court on August 7, 1740.

    Deed Book 2, page 125: Indenture (Mortgage) made the 27th day of June, 1741, between William STROUD, Planter, and Drury STITH, Gent., conveying 196;acres on both sides of Sturgeon Run and 392 acres which was surveyed for John STROUD, dec'd. in 1729, to secure payment of 12 pounds, 12 shillings and 2 pence. Witnesses were M. CADET YOUNG, Wm. MACLIN, and Thomas SADLER. Acknowledged in Court on December 3, 1741.

    Deed Book 2, page 236: Indenture made the 28th day of February, 1742, between Cornelius KEITH and Thomas TWITTY, for 25 pounds, conveying 100 acres, being same land in that certain deed of gift from Robert HIX,, Sr., late of Brunswick County, dec'd. to the said Cornelius KEITH, dated the 2nd day of May, 1734, and the same being part of a larger tract of land granted to the said Robert HIX in his lifetime. Witnesses were Clement READ, M. CADET YOUNG, and Thomas LANIER. Acknowledged in Court on March 3, 1742, at which time Elizabeth, wife of the said Cornelius KEITH, appeared and relinquished her dower interest.

    [??] On 2 Sep 1744, William Gent of Edgecombe Co., NC sold his remaining land in Brunswick Co., VA to William Irby (Brunswick from Prince George, Isle of Wight and Surry in 1720). Mary, wife of William, relinquished her right of dowry. M. Cadet Young, Moses Dunkrey and Charles King were witnesses.

    BRUNSWICK COUNTY, VIRGINIA, 4 January 1745, M. Cadet Young, Thomas Brooks, and John Maclin witnessed the Will of Mary Maclin. The will was prove 5 February 1746 by the testimony of the witnesses. (Kinfolks, Harllee, William C., New Orleans, Searcy & Pfaff (1934) at p. 2636)

    BRUNSWICK COUNTY, VIRGINIA - WILL BOOK 2, p. 129: Mary Maclin proved Feb. 5, 1746 Witnesses: John Maclin , Thomas Brooke , M. CADET YOUNG.

    Brunswick County, Virginia Deed Book 3 Page 174: Indenture made 3 March 1745/6 between William Tilman of Brunswick County and George Tilman of same, 5 Shillings, South side of Waqua Creek, 617a as in Certain Letters Patent dated 28 September 1732 whereby the said Land was granted to the said William Tilman. Signed William Tillman. Witnesses: Lewis Parham, William Irby, M. CADET YOUNG. Court April 3, 1746, Indenture acknowledged by Wm. Tillman.
    Deed Book 3, Page 175: Indenture made 3 April 1746 between George Tillman of Brunswick County and William Tillman of same, for Love and Affection and 5 Shillings, on Stoney Hill Run, 512a, it being 308a which was granted to Roger Tillman by Patent dated 7 July 1726 and then acknowledged to the said George Tillman at a court held for Brunswick 6 December 1739 and rest of land was granted to the said George Tillman by Pattent dated 22 September 1739, and the said William Tillman doth agree that the said George Tillman shall quietly & peaceably have hold use occupy possess and enjoy the manner plantation with all the Lands & premises thereto belonging during his Natural Life & if it shall so Happen that Mary who is now Wife to the said George Tillman shall survive her said Husband she is to have the same Land & Plantation also agreed to by the said George Tillman & William Tillman. Signed George Tillman and William Tillman. Witnesses: Lewis Parham, William Irby, M. CADET YOUNG. Court April 3, 1746, Indenture acknowledged by George Tillman.

    Deed Book 3, page 182: Indenture made the 1st day of May, 1746 (MDCCXXVI), between Drury STITH and James PARISH and William MACLIN, for 20 pounds, conveying 224 acres on South side of Maherrin River, tract formerly granted to Thomas ALISTER by Letters of Patent bearing date of September 28, 1728 (MDCCXXVII) and conveyed from the said Thomas ALISTER to William WALTERS to Drury STITH, Sr. Witnesses were M. CADET YOUNG and Moses DUNKLEY. Acknowledged in Court by Drury Stith on May 1, 1746.
    Deed Book 3, Page 182: Indenture made the 1st day of May, 1746 between Drury Stith of St. Andrew Parish, Brunswick County, and James Parish and William Maclin, for 20 pounds, conveying 224 acres on South of same parish and County, South side of Maherrin River, 224a, it being the same tract of land formerly granted to Thomas Alister by Letters Patent dated 28 September 1728 and by the said Alister conveyed to William Talters & by him conveyed to Drury Stith Senr, dated 1 May 1746. Signed Drury Stith. Witnesses: M. CADET YOUNG, Moses Dunkley. Court May 1, 1746, Deed acknowledged by Drury Stith.

    Deed Book 3, page 537: Indenture made the 4th day of January, 1748, between Robert GEE and Nathaniel HARRISON, for 37 pounds and 10 shillings, conveying 413 acres, adjoining land of LANIER, READ, HARWELL and LLOYD, and being part of land granted to the said Robert GEE by Letters of Patent bearing date of January 12, 1746 (MDCCXXXVI). Witnesses were M. Cadet YOUNG, Hervy MORRIS, and William MORRIS. Acknowledged in Court on March 2, 1748.

    Deed Book 3, Page 565: John Lloyd of St. Andrew Parish, Brunswick County, Planter for £8-1 Shillings paid by Thomas Lloyd Junr. of same, Planter, goods and chattels, dated 18 March 1748. Signed John Lloyd (bhm). Witnesses: M Cadet Young, Thomas Sadler, William Stroud Senr (bhm). Inventory of goods &; Chattels to Thomas Lloyd Junr.on 18 March 1748. Signed John Lloyd. Witnesses: M Cadet Young, Thomas Sadler, William Stroud Senr. (bhm). Court June 1, 1749. Bill of Sale and Inventory proved by oath of Michael Cadet Young.

    Deed Book 3, Page 515: Micahel Wall Sheriff. This 13th Day of June 1748. Miachel Wall Sherif made Oath before me that this is true copy taken for this County Given under my hand this day above written. Signed John Willis.. [Among many others ] Michael Young.

    Deed Book 3, page 522: Indenture made the 3rd day of November, 1748, between John Davis of Cumberland Parrish, Lunenburgh County, and Buckner STITH, for 115 pounds, conveying 480 acres, on South side of Sturgeon Run, and being part of a larger tract granted to the said John DAVIS and Baxter DAVIS by Letters of Patent bearing date of September 28, 1728. Witnesses were M. Cadet YOUNG, Henry EMBRY, Jr., and Thomas SADLER. Acknowledged in Court on January 5, 1748..

    Deed Book 3, page 537: Indenture made the 4th day of January, 1748, between Robert GEE and Nathaniel HARRISON, for 37 pounds and 10 shillings, conveying 413 acres, adjoining land of LANIER, READ, HARWELL and LLOYD, and being part of land granted to the said Robert GEE by Letters of Patent bearing date of January 12, 1746 (MDCCXXXVI). Witnesses were M. CADET YOUNG, Hervy MORRIS, and William MORRIS. Acknowledged in Court on March 2, 1748.

    Deed Book 3, Page 537: Indenture made 4 January 1748, between Robert Gee of St. Andrew Parish, Brunswick County, and Nathaneil Harrison of same. £37-10 Shillings, on South side of Sturgeon Runn, 413a. Signed Robert Gee. Witnesses: M. CADET YOUNG, Henry Morris, William Morris. Court March 2, 1748, Indenture and memorandum acknowledged by Robert Gee.

    Indenture made the 3rd day of November, 1748, between John Davis of Cumberland Parrish, Lunenburgh County, and Buckner STITH, for 115 pounds, conveying 480 acres, on South side of Sturgeon Run, and being part of a larger tract granted to the said John DAVIS and Baxter DAVIS by Letters of Patent bearing date of September 28, 1728. Witnesses were M. CADET YOUNG, Henry EMBRY, Jr., and Thomas SADLER. Acknowledged in Court on January 5, 1748. DeedBook 3, page 522.

    Deed Book 3, Page 570. Ralph Dunkley of St. Andrew Parish, Brunswick County held firmly bound unto George Clayton of same, in sum of ?80, dated 1 June 1749. Condition of obligation that if Ralph Dunkley shall make over in open court by good & lawfull deeds or other conveyance a tract of land lying on the Ridge between Waqua & Sturgeon Run and adjoining the lines of the said Clayton, Fisher & Griffin or otherwise to Return the Survey into the Secretary Office in the said George Claytons name when required then obligation to be void. Signed Ralph Dunkley. Witnesses: M Cadet Young, Richd. Vaughan (bhm). Court June 1, 1749, Bond acknowledged by Ralph Dunkley.

    Deed Book 3, Page 621: Indenture made 16 December 1749, between Charles Clanton of St. Andrew Parish, Brunswick County, and Thomas Clanton of same, £20, 213a. Signed Charles Clanton (bhm). Witnesses: M Cadet Young, Richard Hyde (bhm). Court December 26, 1749, Indenture and Memorandum acknowledged by Charles Clanton.

    Brunswick Co., VA. Will Book 3, p. 19: Will of Sterling Clack of St. Andrews Parish, , will Jan. 1750, proved on 26 March 1751 by Michael Cadet Young and other witnesses, Henry Morris and Clack Courtney. (The Family Chronicle and Kinship Book, Bond, Octavia Zollicoffer, Nashville, Tenn. McDaniel Print. Co.1928, pp. 618, 619.)

    Deed Book 4, Page 171: Indenture made this 26 June 1750, between Samuel Dispain of Brunswick County, and Samuel Marshall of same, £30, 200a, on S side of Maherrin River that was granted to the said Samuel Dispain by Letters Patent dated 20 August 1748. Signed Samuel Dispain (bhm). Wit: Andrew Metcalfe, Anthony Metcalfe, M Cadet Young. Court 26 June 1750, Indenture and Memorandum acknowledged by Samuel Dispain.

    Deed Book 5, page 22: Indenture made the 26th day of March, 1751, between Hezekiah THROWER of the Johnston County, North Carolina, and Joseph WRENN of Surry County, Virginia, for 37 pounds, conveying to Hezekiah THROWER, 195 acres beginning at upper Fork of the first Great Creek above Christianna Fort, granted to John Ray, by patent bearing date of October 16, 1727. Witnesses were M. CADET YOUNG and Thomas JACKSON. Presented in Court on March 26, 1751.

    Deed Book 5, Page 118: Indenture made 29 March 1751, between George Clayton of St. Andrew Parish, Brunswick County, and William Rawlings of same, £30, 202a, being the same formerly granted to the said George Clayton by Letters Patent dated 20 August 1748. Signed George Clayton. Wit: William Harrison, M. Cadet Young, The: Burk. Court 25 September 1751, Indenture acknowledged by George Clayton.

    Deed Book 5, Page 107: Indenture made 25 September 1751 between Thomas Alstine of Surry County, Ship Carpenter and Thomas Singleton of Brunswick County, £80-8 Shillings, 804a, on South side of Totero Creek and being part of a Larger Tract formerly granted by Letters Patent to Henry Harrison Esqr. late of Huntington decd. and by him in his Lifetime conveyed to the said Thomas Alstine as by deed for that purpose in the records of this County may more largely appear. Signed Thomas Allstin. Wit: Lemuel Cocke, Randall Bracey, M Cadet Young. Court 25 September 1751, Indenture and memorandum acknowledged by Thomas Austine.

    Deed Book 5, Page 143: Indenture made 1 January 1752, between Hinchia Mabry the Elder of St. Andrew Parish, Brunswick County, and Anne his wife, and Clack Courtney of same, Chyrurgeon, £150, 578a, on both sides of Stoney Hill Run, as in and by a Patent dated 5 July last past granted to the said Anne by the name of Anne Courtney. Signed Hinchey Mabry (bhm), Anne Mabry. Receipt witnessed by M Cadet Young. Court 1 January 1752, Indenture acknowledged by Hinchia Mabry and Anne his wife; receipt acknowledged by the said Hinchia, previous to which Anne was privily examined.

    "Record of acknowlegment by T. Field (spelled ffeild here) that he has received from Buckner Stith an assignment of George and Robert Austin's n (?) bond to him dated 9 April, 1755, whereon is due 63 pounds, 17s and 1d. which said money is received on a mortgage made ...... since contracted by Michael Cadet Young to Theophilus Field the 27 March, 1753. On a tract of land in Brunswick County containing 882 acres ... dated 17 June, 1755, and recorded 24 June, 1755." <stith.packent.com/aunt_estie/letters/19610221.html>

    Book 7, Page 16: Indenture made the 9th day of September, 1761, between Richard Vaughan, the Younger, and John Westmoreland, for 32 pounds, conveying 63 acres and 3 quarters, on South side of Wagua Creek and on both sides of Beaverpond Branch, and being part of a larger tract of 250 acres formerly granted to Richard Vaughan, the elder, by Letters Patent and was by a clause in the Last Will and Testament of the said Richard Vaughan bequeathed the 250 acres to his two grandsons, Richard Vaughan and Abraham Vaughan, to be equally divided between them and that the division be made across the Beaver Pond Branch, the half of which division on the North side of the said Branch is hereby gargained and sold on the North side of the same. Signed by Richard Vaughan (his mark). Witnesses were Thomas Butler and M. CADET YOUNG. Indenture and Memorandum of Livery of Seizin were acknowledged in Court on September 28,1761, by Richard Vaughan. Deed.

    Brunswick Will Book 4, pt.2
    227 (323) Will of Amy Gilliam 30 Nov 1760, 28 March 1763. Witnessed by Mychaile Cadle [sic] Young, Mary Vaughn, William Vaughn. Proved by Michaiel Cadle [sic] Young , 28 March 1763.


    MCY Letters:
    Here are transcriptions of the four letters in the Kennedy Collection written by Michael Cadet Young

    Michael Cadet Young Letter February 1st, 1767, to Thomas Young [Copy of original in paper file.]

    My son,
    I wish you joy of your fourth daughter which it has pleased God to send you, and I hope that Judith will have a good time of it and that she will get well again after the difficulties of child bearing. Nod [apparently a slave] tells me that you and yours are well excepting his mistress?s condition which God grant may be to her and your comfort.

    I sent you by Capt. Stith a note to ?? Mr. Taylor or his deputy to give you my order for attendance as a witness between Stith and Cordbreath [?] and I had expected that when Nod came down that you had sent it by him, but it seems you did not: I am in great need of the same for I expect now an prosecution against me daily for a debt which I thought I had clear of and was accepted on Co. Stith?s hands, but contrary to that, I was served with a Scire Facias to renew the judgment in order to run me to an [?] charge which I am determined never [to] pay as there was an assumption on the one hand and an acceptance on the other . If you have not been to the office[?] the order, pray mighty god [obscure words] your affairs will admit and [?] you [your?] [?] come and you send it by him; In the mean time, if the Execution comes, I am resolved to go to prison and stay there as the law directs and swear myself out for you are sensible that what little is in the house and out of doors belongs to you and your brother John and sister, saving the mare saddle and cart which really is all the property I have.

    Inclosed [sic] is a letter to Mr. Hudgin which beg you?ll give to him, it is to demand ten shillings of him at [?] for he owes me twenty more which is thirty in all and if it suits him to pay the whole I shall be glad to receive it, if not, ten will suffice for the present for I am in great need of that quantity of money and can?t tell what to do without it. I [give or grant] you and yours my blessing and am you affectionate father. M Cadet Young
    Tuesday Morning February 1st, 1767
    P.S. Mr. Hudgin lives at or near Coll. Garland

    [My note: stapled to the copy of the letter I received was a note of debt to Thomas Young for four pounds, dated January 2, 1768. It is not signed and does not seem to belong with the letter, so I have not transcribed it as part of this letter.]

    Michael Cadet Young Letter: ?To Thomas Cadet Young on Crooked Creek, Lunenburgh County?

    Thursday 2nd of June 1768
    Son Thomas,
    This day your Brother Legros intended for your House in order to proceed on his journey to the Congarees, but just before his departure from home your sister?s suitor Brock, arrived with his waggon [sic] from Petersburg and insisted on his staying this night, indeed myself and your mother required him to stay ?till morning which upon our [?] he agreed to.

    Mr. Brock seems to be very [?] on his courtship and by what I guess by her conduct [she? M?] has an inclination to him and to be fully satisfied of the man?s character, and way of living. Your mother [her?] self has desired your Brother Legros to call upon John Marshall and to make enquiry of him and others in the neighborhood about Brock and to know for certain the truth of his conduct and living, which you Brother is to acquaint me by a letter. But I think it would be much better if your business could permit it, that you would take [?] with your Brother as far as Fishing Creek to be satisfied [?]: For various are the reports concerning him. Some saying that he is a married man and others that he is not, and that his wagon and team are his own property, if so considering the misfortunes your poor sister has had it will be a tolerable match for her, but if it be otherwise, she must wait longer to better her self.

    [The next section seems to have been written later. Most of the first sentence, and perhaps more, is missing. ]
    When I came ?. after [?] stay, I [?] over to Capt. Buchner Stitth?s to keep house for them that night while they were gone to Capt. ??mmon?s to a Coit Play and when I returned in the morning was agreeably surprised with the [?] of your brother who was come back from his journey to a [several words obscure] of the character of Brock who is such a base scoundrel Your Brother went to [see?] John Marshall who informed him that the base intruder was a married man that he has a wife and two children [words obscure] that they wo?? [his?] habits with papers for such; that he, the said Brock, is a drunken worthless fellow; that he owes to one Mr. Parks for whom he waggons for at least sixty or seventy pounds; that he is so dishonest that Marshal was afraid to trust him with his tobbo [tobacco] when he waggoned it to the Point; that it is expected that he will run away soon and that he is so much in debt that it is impossible for him soon to get out of it and in short that he is a very roguish knave. These tidings from your kind brother came very opportunely to prevent the misery and shame your sister would by this rogue?s insinuations have been brought to, if not thus timely prevented. I am resolved if ever he comes again (or any such) not to suffer him to stay in my house and to sharply reprimand him for his wicked designs.

    [There seems to be a missing piece to the letter because the first sentence in the following section does not fit with the last sentence in the previous section.]
    toward his sister in preventing this [?] delusion?s taking effect upon her and has advised her for the future to be very cautious of all strangers, and indeed of every man who pretends to offer their humble service to her, and not to give anyone too much liberties, but to keep them off at proper distance ?till she knows in the first place what they are and secondly if they are upon honorable forms and lastly if they are sincerely and affectionately bent upon matrimony; and if so, then not to give her suitor no more liberties than modesty will bear and [?] require. With this advice he took his leave of her and his Mother on the Monday following, and then came to me who was in the corn-field and bad me farewell and proceeded on his journey again the second time.

    I hope that you and Judith and Children are all well which is the desire of your affectionate father. M. Cadet Young.

    Michael Cadet Young Letter December 1769

    Son Thomas,
    I commend you for your industry and care in advancing your self and making provision for your family, but in the mean time, you are undutiful to me who thro? God is the author of your being here. You are sensible of the low station of health I am in, which if you had that filial duty in you as a son should have for his father must give you some anxiety considering that I got this lingering ailment in riding early and late in the tending upon you in your late sickness and that it was thro? my care and blessing of God that you mended from your dangerous illness. But for all my care and [?] I am forgot and neglected by you. It is as [?] you could have done, at least in this Holyday times either to have sent or come yourself to know how your aged father was which you undoubtedly would have done if I had an estate to leave behind me, but as I have nothing, I am dispised and forgot.

    You promised me at your unfortunate brother?s funeral that you would take an assignment of Wicked Ralph?s bond [?? Ralph Dunkley?? Ralph Hubbard??], and sue him to recover the contents of the same, which I want done as soon as possible, and make him know that I am not to be deceived any longer by his lies. I am not in a condition to attend a court so far distant from me, and supposed, as you are my son, that you would do that piece of service for me, if you will not and this is much trouble to you, I must apply to some other person that [has? tear in paper] charity in them and a fellow feeling. I am in great want of money to discharge what little [?] before I leave this world, and God knows how soon that may be, for I feel the lamp of life decaying every day; my breath grows shorter and shorter, so that I can?t sport myself the least as can be, not even walk but with great difficulty for the want of breath: I hope that you and your family are well which is the sincere desire of your affectionate father.
    [Xber] the 22nd, 1769.

    [My note: Given what appears to be ?X? in the month and MCY?s reference to the ?Holydays,? I think this letter was written in December of 1769. Although most sources say that he died in 1769, I think the letter in which he asked TCY to care for TCY?s mother in her old age, was written after this letter. This would probably mean that MCY died early in 1770. I believe the cover of this letter is addressed to ?Mr. Thomas Young, factor of John Bennet.? This raises additional questions about the wealth of the Young family.]

    Michael Cadet Young Letter -- Undated Probably late December 1769 or early January 1770.

    Son Thomas,
    When you and Judith were down to see me you was very desirous to know what I had to say to you before you left me, but seeing you somewhat [?] at my unhappy condition, I did refrain from opining my last sentiments to you; and gave you in [lieu thereof?] a paper for the regulation of your family for I knew very well that what I am now dictating would have set the whole family in fear. Now what I request at your hands is this, that you will take [?] care of your poor indigent mother and suffer her not to want in her old age [the next two sentences are obscured by what looks to be old scotch tape. MCY seems to be writing about the ?debt that is owing from a child to parent? in old age] repays back the cares, troubles, and anxieties which parents undergo in the raising them to the state of manhood.

    I should have recommended her to your brother Francis as your elder brother but poor Betty is such an infirm body that it would be very disagreeable and irksome to my poor old mate. Therefore my son I am in hopes that you will comply with the desires of your dying father who earnestly wishes you and yours well, by praying to God that he may [?] on all your just and honest undertakings; and may that same almighty pour down upon you his heavenly benediction is the hearty desire of your afflicted and affectionate dying father. M. Cadet Young

    [My note: I think this was one of the last letters MCY wrote. I suspect TCY responded to MCY?s 22 December 1769 letter with an immediate visit, but MCY didn?t use the occasion to discuss his own impending death. This letter followed shortly after the visit.]

    * * * *
    Select Virginia Huguenot Resources in the Library of Virginia [not in the Huguenot Library at Manakin

    Call Number: 32204 Title: Young family genealogical Material: 7 leaves. Summary: This accession discusses the French Huguenot ancestry of Michael Cadet Young of Brunswick County, Virginia. He emigrated to Virginia in 1722 and translated the Cadet surname to the English form of Young, adopting both surnames: Michael Cadet Young (ca. 1690-1768). Includes his descendants, who, upon his death, dropped the surname Cadet and used only the surname Young. Format: Photocopies. Related Related Title: : Young family genealogical chart (accessions 27663 and 28929). Subject - Personal Cadet, Francis, d. 1712. Young, Michael Cadet, ca. 1690-1768. Cadet family. Young family. Genre/Form Genealogies -- France. Genealogies -- Virginia -- Brunswick County.

    SOME IMPORTATIONS FROM ORDER BOOKS BRUNSWICK CO B 1, p.241- 3 B 1, p. 241- 3 May 1739 - Also Michael Cadet Young?is now Seventeen years since his Importation from great Brittain?
    1 2
  • Change Date: 11 May 2008 at 15:21:20



    Father: Francois (Francis) Cadet b: BEF 1673 in Niort, Poitou, France
    Mother: Marie Marthe Le Gros

    Marriage 1 Temperance b: ABT 1703 in St. Andrew's Parish, Brunswick County, Virginia
    • Married: ABT 1742 in Virginia 3
    Children
    1. Has No Children Francis Cadet Young b: 25 Oct 1731 in Bristol Parish, Prince George, Virginia c: 25 Dec 1731 in Bristol Parish, Prince George, Virginia
    2. Has Children Thomas Cadet Young b: 5 Jan 1733 in The Oaks on Crooked Creek, Brunswick Co Virginia
    3. Has No Children Michael Cadet Young Jr. b: ABT 1740/1741 in Brunswick County, Virginia
    4. Has Children LeGros Cadet Young b: 1734
    5. Has No Children John Young b: ABT 1745 in Brunswick County, Virginia
    6. Has No Children Martha Young
    7. Has No Children William Young b: ABT 1745 in Brunswick County, Virginia

    Sources:
    1. Title: Young, Michael Cadet, Family
      Author: Janice McAlpine
      Publication: 2006 Research
    2. Title: International Genealogical Index
      Note: 942.1 L1 B4H V. 16 Book: Batch C049031; Michell Cadet, chr. 28 March 1694' s/o Francois Cadet & Marie
    3. Title: International Genealogical Index
      Note: Record submitted after 1991 by a member of the LDS Church to request LDS Temple ordinances. Michael Cadet Young, s/o Francis Young & Martha Le Gros

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