South Alabama Roots and Branches and New England's Founders

Entries: 62008    Updated: 2013-07-12 15:57:16 UTC (Fri)    Contact: Mary

Always Under Construction / Always Subject To Revision

Index | Descendancy | Register | Download GEDCOM | Public Profile | Add Post-em | View Post-em (1)

  • ID: I45068 View Post-em!
  • Name: James Oliver MORGAN
  • Sex: M
  • Birth: BET 1782 AND 1794 in Edgefield Co. SC
  • Death: 25 JUN 1877 in Brantley, Crenshaw Co. AL
  • Burial: Oak Grove Cem. Crenshaw Co. AL
  • Note:
    http://www.andalusiastarnews.com/genealogy_archives/09222001cthomasson.htm l
    Genealogy column written by Curtis Thomasson for the Andalusia Star News
    © 2000 Andalusia Star News, All Rights Reserved.

    "Morgan ancestors settled in northeast Covington and Crenshaw Counties"

    By Curtis Thomasson
    The Andalusia Star-News

    While an early settler, Seaborn Morgan, was in Covington County by 1855, there is no knowledge currently of his family or any relationship to other Morgans in the area. During 1855, he purchased 313 acres of land in the Falco community, but no additional information is known.


    The progenitor of most Morgan descendants of Covington County was James Oliver Morgan, born in 1794 in Edgefield County, S.C. In 1816, he was married in Augusta, Ga., to Mary Dathney, who was born in 1794 in North Carolina.

    Soon after their marriage, the young couple made their home in Greene County, Ga., where their first two children were born. They moved next to Henry County, where the remainder of their children were born. A few years later, the family moved further west to Columbus in Muscogee County, Georgia.

    While living in Columbus, the children began to choose mates and form their own families. By the 1850 U.S. Census of Muscogee County, the family had only the youngest three children still residing at home.

    James Oliver and Mary reared the following children: Green Berry, b. 1818, d. 1906, m. Darkis Tabitha Taylor; William Boynton, b. 1819, d. 1908, m. (1) Nancy Coffee (2) Nancy Wallace; James Jackson, b. 1822, d. 1898, m. (1) Susan Cartledge (2) Rebecca Eleanor Coffee; Lucinda A., b. 1825, d. 1855, m. Calvin Bland; Cynthia, b. ca 1826; Christopher Columbus, b. 1828, d. before 1900, m. Adaline Culpepper; Elijah Oliver, b. 1829, d. 1911, m. Sophia Ann Lanier; Thomas S., b. ca 1833, d. 1865, m. Nancy Askew and Julia A., b. ca 1836.

    During the 1850s, some members of the family became attracted to south Alabama. It was probably, as it was for so many other families, the lure of cheap land featuring virgin forests and rich soil.

    The first of the family to make the move was James Oliverís son, Christopher Columbus, and his wife, Adaline Culpepper. They were settled in Butler County by 1860 when their son, William, was born in Greenville. Their other children were born in the same general area.

    The rest of the family remained in Georgia during the trying war years. In 1851, Elijah Oliver had married Sophia Ann, the daughter of Lewis and Mary Lanier. They lived in Chattahoochee County, near his parents, and began their family. They reared the following children: Roxie Ann Victoria, b. 1852, d. 1947, m. Thomas Calvin Capels; Judge McDuffie, b. 1854, d. 1908, m. (1) Nancy Jeanette Ruth Walker (2) Laura Viola Everage; Jessie Oliver L., b. 1858, d. 1937, m. (1) Mattie Eunice Payne (2) Lula Kilcrease; Elijah Harper, b. 1861, d. 1941, m. Laura McDonald; Mary E., b. 1863, d. 1902, m. John Pleasant Tisdale; Sara Ellen, b. 1866, d. 1934, m. Daniel M. Short; William Thomas, b. 1868, d. 1893, m. Laura Ann Louise Wyatt; Sophia Ann P., b. 1870, d. 1876; Georgia Catherine, b. 1872, d. 1966, m. William Robert Tisdale; Nathan Stanton, b. 1875, d. 1969, m. Dora Carrie Barrington; and Namon Jonah, b. 1877, d. 1964, m. Elvira Mariah Wyatt.

    During the war in 1862, Elijah enlisted as a private in the Phillips Legion, Company B, C.S.A. and continued service until he was paroled at the end of the war. Following the war, probably in the later part of 1865, he moved his family to Alabama. They settled in the northeast corner of Covington County, but the property fell in Crenshaw County when it was created in 1866.

    About the same time, Elijah and Christopherís father, James Oliver, moved what was left of his family to the same area. With him were his wife and his daughter, Julia Ann, with her two children. They were probably encouraged by the relatives already living here and looking for a way to recover from the ravages of the war.

    Julia Ann had lost her husband, James Jefferson Lanier, a brother to Elijahís wife, during the war. He entered the Confederate Army as a member of Company B, 31st. Regiment of the Georgia Volunteer Infantry, and died at the end of 1862. He left Julia a young widow with their two young children, Melissa and James Albert. They returned to her parentsí home and made the move to Alabama. They were still in this family when the 1870 census was taken.

    Following his father and brothers, Green Berry, moved his family into Alabama during the mid-1870s and settled near his relatives. He and Dorcus soon became grandparents, and the family became rooted in the southeast corner of Crenshaw County. They became closely associated with the Union Primitive Baptist Church. During 1887, he, his son, James Henry, each homesteaded 80 acres of land in the Union community. Also, Snow B. Morgan homesteaded 161 acres of land in the same section.

    The brother named James Jackson had moved his family to Pike County by 1870. He had lost his first wife, Susan Cartledge, in Georgia and was remarried there to Rebecca Eleanor Coffee. They eventually settled in Coffee County where they died and were buried in the Keyton Cemetery on the outskirts of Enterprise. The only known child for James Jackson is a daughter, Rosie, born to his second wife. She was born in 1853 and died in 1931.

    Another brother, Thomas, lost his life during early 1865 in the conflict in Virginia. Apparently the other children of James Oliver chose to remain in Georgia.

    There were several members of the next generation of this family who moved into Covington County to rear their families. In the next column, a number of these will be presented to identify the descendants and to recognize other families related to this one.

    Appreciation is expressed to two descendants of this family, Rex Everage of Enterprise and Dan Shehan of Andalusia, who graciously shared their family records for this writing. Anyone who might have corrections or additional information is requested to contact Curtis Thomasson at Route 9, Box 97, Andalusia, AL 36420 or Email: chthom@alaweb.com

    *This is copied here for information only. Do not re-print this article for publication anywhere as it is copyrighted material.*




    Marriage 1 Mary DATHNEY b: 1794 in NC
    • Married: 6 APR 1816 in Richmond Co. GA
    Children
    1. Has No Children Green Berry MORGAN b: 7 FEB 1818
    2. Has No Children William Boynton MORGAN b: 12 SEP 1819
    3. Has No Children James Jackson MORGAN b: 1822
    4. Has No Children Lucinda MORGAN b: ABT 1825
    5. Has No Children Christopher Columbus MORGAN b: ABT 1827
    6. Has Children Elijah Oliver MORGAN b: AUG 1829 in Henry Co. GA
    7. Has No Children Thomas S. MORGAN b: BET 1833 AND 1836
    8. Has Children Julia Ann MORGAN b: ABT 1836

  • Index | Descendancy | Register | Download GEDCOM | Public Profile | Add Post-em | View Post-em (1)

    This file is a guide, not proof. However I will gladly correct errors and omissions. And I always appreciate additional infomation. Some major changes have been made!

    Printer Friendly Version Printer Friendly Version Search Ancestry Search Ancestry Search WorldConnect Search WorldConnect Join Ancestry.com Today! Join Ancestry.com Today!

    WorldConnect Home | WorldConnect Global Search | WorldConnect Help

    RootsWeb.com, Inc. is NOT responsible for the content of the GEDCOMs uploaded through the WorldConnect Program. If you have a problem with a particular entry, please contact the submitter of said entry. You have full control over your GEDCOM. You can change or remove it at any time.