J.H. Garner Genealogy Database

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  • ID: I8 View Post-em!
  • Name: Lloyd Herin GARNER 1 2 3 4
  • Sex: M
  • Change Date: 20 JUN 2010
  • Birth: 17 MAY 1898 in Sweetwater, Newton Co, Missouri 5 6 7 8
  • Residence: BEF 1960 Pinehurst, Shoshone Co, Idaho
  • Note: Also lived in Deadwood Gulch in Shoshone County.
  • Death: 08 APR 1967 in West Shoshone Hospital, Kellogg, Shoshone Co, Idaho
  • Note: Died of a (2nd) stroke. 9 10
  • Occupation: Employed as a foreman at the Bunker Hill Smelter for 43 years. BET 1921 AND 1964 Smelterville, Shoshone Co, Idaho
  • Education: 3rd grade education.
  • Event: Note
  • Note: A mechanical genius. He built a portable saw mill out of an old White school bus that cut more precisely than modern mills
  • Burial: APR 1967 Greenwood Cem, Kellogg, Shoshone Co, Idaho
  • Note: The plot he shares with his wife Margaret is in the Industrial Union Section of the cemetery.
  • RETI: 01 JUN 1963
  • Note: He retired from the Bunker Hill Company smelter in Smelterville, Shoshone Co, ID, on June 1, 1963, after working there for 40 years. 11
  • Event: Note 05 OCT 1921
  • Note: The World Series was broadcast on radio for the first time on October 5, 1921.
  • Event: Note 30 OCT 1938
  • Note: The radio play "The War of the Worlds," starring Orson Welles, aired on CBS on October 30, 1938. (The live drama, which employed fake news reports, panicked some listeners who thought its portrayal of a Martian invasion was real.)
  • Event: Note 05 DEC 1933
  • Note: The Twenty-first Amendment of the U.S. Constitution was ratified on December 5, 1933, ending the "noble experiment" of prohibition.
  • Event: Note 07 DEC 1941
  • Note: Japanese forces attacked American and British territories and possessions in the Pacific, including the home base of the U.S. Pacific Fleet at Pearl Harbor in Hawaii on December 7, 1941.
  • Event: Note 11 DEC 1941
  • Note: Germany and Italy declared war on the United States on December 11, 1941; the U.S. responded in kind.
  • Event: Note 16 JAN 1920
  • Note:
    Prohibition began in the United States on January 16, 1920 as the 18th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution (ratified one year before on January 16, 1919) took effect. (It was later repealed by the 21st Amendment in 1933.)

    Federal Prohibition agents (police) were given the task of enforcing the law. Many social problems have been attributed to the Prohibition era. A profitable, often violent, black market for alcohol flourished. Racketeering happened when powerful gangs corrupted law enforcement agencies. Stronger liquor sales surged in popularity because its potency made it more profitable to smuggle. The cost of enforcing prohibition was high, and the lack of tax revenues on alcohol (some $500 million annually nationwide) affected government coffers. When repeal of prohibition occurred in 1933, following passage of the Twenty-first Amendment, organized crime lost nearly all of its black market alcohol profits in most states (states still had the right to enforce their own laws concerning alcohol consumption), due to competition with low-priced alcohol sales at legal liquor stores.

    While the manufacture, sale, and transport of alcohol was illegal in the U.S., it was not illegal in surrounding countries. Distilleries and breweries in Canada, Mexico, and the Caribbean flourished as their products were either consumed by visiting Americans or illegally imported to the U.S.

    Prohibition had a notable effect on the brewing industry in the United States. When Prohibition ended, only half the breweries that had previously existed reopened. Wine historians also note that Prohibition destroyed what was a fledgling wine industry in the United States. Productive wine quality grape vines were replaced by lower quality vines growing thicker skinned grapes that could be more easily transported. Much of the institutional knowledge was also lost as winemakers either emigrated to other wine producing countries or left the business altogether. It was not until the Paris Wine Tasting of 1976 that American wines could claim to be world class.
    12
  • Event: Note 06 MAR 1933
  • Note:
    A nationwide bank holiday declared by President Roosevelt went into effect on March 6, 1933. In 1933 incoming president Franklin D. Roosevelt saw the severe problems of the depression as requiring immediate and direct relief. The most immediate need lay in the on-going banking crisis. As people panicked and withdrew all their money from the nation's banks, many banks began to fail and were forced to close their doors.

    In an effort to stop these runs on the banks, FDR declared a bank holiday which temporarily closed all US banks while the government addressed the problems. Congress passed FDR's Emergency Banking Relief Bill and stable banks were allowed to reopen. Unstable banks were either given government assistance to insure their stability or were closed down and absorbed by larger banks.
  • Event: Note 28 FEB 1932
  • Note: On February 28, 1932, the last Ford Model A was produced, ending an era for the Ford Motor Company. The successor to the Model T, the Model A was an attempt to escape the image of bare bones transportation that had driven both the Model T's success and its ultimate failure in the market. The vastly improved Model A boasted elegant Lincoln-like styling, a peppy 40 horsepower four-cylinder engine, and a self-starting mechanism. The Model A was as affordable as its predecessor, and with a base price at $460, five million Model A's rolled onto American highways between 1927 and 1932.
  • Event: Note 22 MAR 1933
  • Note: During Prohibition, President Roosevelt signed a measure on March 22, 1933 to make wine and beer containing up to 3.2 percent alcohol legal.
  • Event: Note 29 MAR 1943
  • Note: World War II meat, butter and cheese rationing began on March 29, 1943.
  • Event: Note BET 06 JUN 1942 AND 17 AUG 1943
  • Note:
    On June 6, 1942, the Japanese invaded and captured Kiska Island in Alaska's Aleutian islands with a force of 500 Marines as a diversionary part of the Japanese plan for the Battle of Midway. The Japanese captured the sole inhabitants of the island: a small U.S. Navy Weather Detachment consisting of ten men, including a lieutenant, along with their dog. One member of the detachment escaped for 50 days. Starving, thin, and extremely cold, he eventually surrendered to the Japanese. The next day, on June 7, the Japanese invaded nearby Attu. The 42 inhabitants who lived on Attu were taken to a prison camp near Otaru, Hokkaido, Japan. There, sixteen of them died.

    This was not part of a greater offensive against the Aleutian Islands and Alaska, as some had believed. Intercepts of Japanese signals had forewarned U.S. authorities that the Japanese action was intended as a diversion from the main Japanese attack at Midway. The military importance of these difficult-to-supply frozen islands were questionable, but the psychological impact upon the Americans of losing U.S. territory was tangible. During the winter of 1942–43, the Japanese reinforced and fortified the islands—not necessarily to prepare for an island-hopping operation across the Aleutians, but to prevent a U.S. operation across the Kuril Islands. A naval force under Rear Admiral Charles McMorris was assigned to interdict the Japanese supply convoys. After the Battle of the Komandorski Islands, Japan abandoned its attempts to resupply its Aleutian garrisons by the surface. From then on, only submarines were used for the resupply runs. During October 1942, American forces undertook seven bombing missions over Kiska, though two were aborted due to inclement weather.

    On May 11, 1943, the operation to recapture Attu began. A shortage of landing craft, unsuitable beaches, and equipment that failed to operate in the appalling weather caused great difficulties in projecting any force against the Japanese. Many soldiers suffered from frostbite because essential supplies could not be landed, or having been landed, could not be moved to where they were needed, because vehicles would not work on the tundra. The Japanese defenders under Colonel Yamasaki did not contest the landings but rather dug in on high ground away from the shore. This caused bloody fighting: there were 3,929 U.S. casualties: 549 were killed, 1148 were injured, 1,200 had severe cold injuries, 614 succumbed to disease, and 318 died of miscellaneous causes, largely Japanese booby traps and friendly fire. The Japanese were defeated in Massacre Valley with a backfire led by Sergeant Morgan Sinclair. The death count for the Japanese was 2,035. The Americans then built Navy Town near Massacre Bay.

    On May 29, the last of the Japanese forces suddenly attacked near Massacre Bay in one of the largest banzai charges of the Pacific campaign. The charge, led by Colonel Yamasaki, penetrated U.S. lines far enough to encounter shocked rear-echelon units of the American force. After furious, brutal, close-quarter, and often hand-to-hand combat the Japanese force was killed almost to the last man: only 28 prisoners were taken, none of them officers. U.S. burial teams counted 2,351 Japanese dead, but it was presumed that hundreds more had been buried by bombardments over the course of the battle.

    On August 17, 1943, an invasion force consisting of 34,426 Allied troops, including 5,300 Canadians, 95 ships (including three battleships and a heavy cruiser), and 168 aircraft landed on Kiska, only to find the island completely abandoned. The Japanese, aware of the loss of Attu and the impending arrival of the larger Allied force, had successfully removed their troops on July 28 under the cover of severe fog, without the Allies noticing. That night, however, the Imperial Japanese Navy warships, thinking they were engaged by Americans, shelled and attempted to torpedo the island of Little Kiska and the Japanese soldiers waiting to embark.

    Allied casualties during the August invasion nevertheless numbered close to 200, all from friendly fire, booby traps set out by the Japanese to inflict damage on the invading allied forces, or disease. There were seventeen Americans and four Canadians killed from either friendly fire or booby traps, fifty more were wounded as a result of friendly fire or booby traps, and an additional 130 men came down with trench foot. The destroyer USS Abner Read hit a mine, resulting in 87 casualties.

    This final removal from the Aleutians spelled the end of any Japanese hopes to invade the United States from the north, and Kiska became of little importance as a base for further Allied attacks.
    12
  • Event: Note 15 MAY 1942
  • Note: Wartime gasoline rationing went into effect in 17 states on May 15, 1942, limiting sales to three gallons a week for non-essential vehicles.
  • Event: Note 08 MAY 1945
  • Note: President Truman announced in a radio address on May 8, 1945 that World War II had ended in Europe.
  • Event: Note 30 MAY 1937
  • Note: Ten people were killed on May 30, 1937 when police fired on steelworkers demonstrating near the Republic Steel plant in Chicago.
  • Event: Note 30 MAY 1943
  • Note: American forces secured the Aleutian island of Attu in Alaska from the Japanese on May 30, 1943.
  • Event: Note MAY 1935
  • Note: Babe Ruth hit the 714th and final home run of his career, for the Boston Braves, in a game against the Pittsburgh Pirates, in May 1935.
  • Event: Note 06 JUN 1944
  • Note: The "D-Day" invasion of Europe took place as Allied forces stormed the beaches of Normandy, France beginning on June 6, 1944.
  • Event: Note 22 NOV 1963
  • Note: U.S. President John F. Kennedy was assassinated in Dallas, Texas at 12:30 p.m. CST on November 22, 1963, while on a political trip through Texas; he was pronounced dead at 1:00 p.m. 12
  • Event: Note 05 JUN 1917
  • Note: About 10 million American men began registering for the draft on June 5, 1917 for World War I.
  • Event: Note 11 JUN 1947
  • Note: The government announced the end of household and institutional sugar rationing on June 11, 1947, to take effect the next day.
  • Event: Note 19 JUN 1910
  • Note: Father's Day was celebrated for the first time on June 19, 1910, in Spokane, WA.
  • Event: Note JUN 1940
  • Note: Adolf Hitler gained a stunning victory as France was forced to sign an armistice on June 22, 1940, eight days after German forces overran Paris on June 13. 12
  • Event: Note 21 JUN 1945
  • Note:
    The Battle of Okinawa ended on June 21, 1945 with an Allied victory; some 13,000 Americans and 90,000 Japanese soldiers, plus 130,000 civilians, were killed in the nearly three-month campaign.

    The battle was the largest amphibious assault during the Pacific campaigns of World War II. It lasted from late March through June 1945. The battle has been referred to as the "Typhoon of Steel" in English, and tetsu no ame ("rain of steel") or tetsu no bofu ("violent wind of steel") in Japanese. The nicknames refer to the ferocity of the fighting, the intensity of gunfire involved, and sheer numbers of Allied ships and armoured vehicles that assaulted the island. Neither side expected Okinawa to be the last major battle of the war, when it in fact was. The Allies were planning to use Okinawa as a staging ground for Operation Downfall, the invasion of the Japanese mainland; however, after the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in August 1945 and the Soviet Union's declaration of war on Japan, Japan surrendered and World War II ended.
    12
  • Event: Note 28 JUN 1919
  • Note: The Treaty of Versailles was signed in France on June 28, 1919, ending World War I.
  • Event: Note 28 JUN 1950
  • Note: North Korean forces captured Seoul, the capital of South Korea, on June 28, 1950.
  • Event: Note 06 AUG 1945
  • Note: On August 6, 1945 the nuclear weapon Little Boy was dropped on Hiroshima by the crew of the Enola Gay, directly killing an estimated 80,000 people and completely destroying approximately 68% of the city's buildings. In the following months, an estimated 60,000 more people died from injuries or radiation poisoning. This was the first use of a nuclear weapon in warfare. The action is estimated to have saved some 1,000,000 American soldiers' lives if an invasion of the Japanese homeland had been necessary due to the Japanese refusal to surrender.
  • Event: Note 14 AUG 1935
  • Note: President Franklin Roosevelt signed the Social Security Act into law on August 14, 1935.
  • Event: Note 31 JAN 1934
  • Note: President Roosevelt devalued the dollar in relation to gold on January 31, 1934.
  • Event: Note 03 MAR 1931
  • Note: "The Star-Spangled Banner" officially became the national anthem of the United States on March 3, 1931.
  • Event: Note 25 AUG 1944
  • Note:
    The streets of Paris were draped with flags of Allied nations today after American and Free French troops took control of the French capital.

    "Gen. Eisenhower's Supreme Command declared that Brig. Gen. Jacques LeClerc's armor was operating in the capital and a broadcast from a reporter with American forces in France spoke of the liberation of Paris as 'a fact,'" reported The News on August 25, 1944.
    13
  • Event: Note 01 SEP 1939
  • Note:
    On September 1, 1939, Germany followed through on its threats to attack Poland. Under the guise of responding to a (fabricated) attack on a German border post, German troops crossed into Poland and began to take cities. The following was reported by the Albuquerque Journal:

    "The German army was ordered to “meet force with force” and Poland was declared dangerous territory for foreigners by Adolf Hitler. At the same time a naval blockade of the Polish harbor of Gdynia was announced. The Fuehrer proclaimed his action was because of alleged Polish violations of the German frontier. Neutral ships in the Baltic were warned they entered Danzig harbor or nearby harbors at their own peril. The announcement said military operations necessitated these measures."
    13



    Father: Joel Labron GARNER b: 12 SEP 1865 in Newton Co, Missouri
    Mother: Debbie Cecilia CLEMENT b: 14 FEB 1878 in Indiana

    Marriage 1 Margaret Ann CLAYTON b: 25 DEC 1901 in Olivet, Osage Co, Kansas
    • Event: Note BET 1925 AND 1927 in Rice, Stevens Co, Washington
    • Note: Lloyd owned a saw mill in Rice, which is where he met his wife, Margaret Clayton, who taught school there. 14
    • Married: 12 MAY 1927 in Kellogg, Shoshone Co, Idaho
    • Event: Widowed APR 1967
    • Note: Her husband Lloyd Garner died in April 1967.
    Children
    1. Has Children Fred Clayton GARNER b: 05 FEB 1928 in Kellogg, Shoshone Co, Idaho
    2. Has No Children Joel William GARNER b: 1929 in Kellogg, Shoshone Co, Idaho
    3. Has Children Paul Garland GARNER b: 02 SEP 1930 in Kellogg, Shoshone Co, Idaho
    4. Has Children Harold David GARNER b: 07 DEC 1931 in Kellogg, Shoshone Co, Idaho
    5. Has Children John Philip GARNER b: 11 MAR 1936 in Wardner Hospital, Kellogg, Shoshone Co, Idaho
    6. Has Children Lyle Edison GARNER b: 05 NOV 1938 in Kellogg, Shoshone Co, Idaho
    7. Has Children Living GARNER

    Sources:
    1. Title: Garner, Grace Elizabeth (Kelso), Recipient: Donald Lee Garner
      Abbrev: Garner, Grace (Kelso)
      Author: Garner, Grace (Kelso)
      Note:
      Grace did much research on the Garner, Adams & Howell lines in the 1970's. Most of her research was donated to the Spokane Public Library; however, they subsequently lost it. She also sent letters, etc. with genealogical info to Donald Lee Garner & his parents, & to Lori (Garner) Elmore. She wrote "Index to Roster of Ohio Soldiers War of 1812", self-published, Spokane, 1974.
      Page: Lloyd Herin Garner
    2. Title: The Washington Ancestry & Records of McClain, Johnson & Forty Other Colonial American Families, Volume: Chart: The Ancestry of Mourning Adams Garner, pp 54-55, Vol I, three volume set
      Abbrev: Washington Ancestry & Record
      Author: Charles Arthur Hoffin
      Publication: Yale University Press, 1932
      Page: Floyd Herring Garner
    3. Title: Bill Ellis, Url: http://www.gencircles.com/users/bill-ellis
      Abbrev: Ellis, Bill
      Author: Bill Ellis, Compiler: www.gencircles.com
      Publication: April 2001
    4. Title: Birth Certificate
      Abbrev: Official Document
      Repository:
        Name: Jay Garner's files.

      Page: Birth Cert for John Philip Garner; Lloyd H. Garner
    5. Title: Social Security Death Benefit Records: Brøderbund Family Archive # 110, Subject: Social Security Death Benefit Records, Url: http://www.familytreemaker.com/
      Abbrev: SS Death Benefits
      Publication: Brøderbund BannerBlue Division
      Page: Vol. 1 Surnames Beginning with G, Internal Ref. # 1.111.3.75766.156
    6. Title: The Washington Ancestry & Records of McClain, Johnson & Forty Other Colonial American Families, Volume: Chart: The Ancestry of Mourning Adams Garner, pp 54-55, Vol I, three volume set
      Abbrev: Washington Ancestry & Record
      Author: Charles Arthur Hoffin
      Publication: Yale University Press, 1932
      Page: b 1898, no place
    7. Title: Garner, Grace Elizabeth (Kelso), Recipient: Donald Lee Garner
      Abbrev: Garner, Grace (Kelso)
      Author: Garner, Grace (Kelso)
      Note:
      Grace did much research on the Garner, Adams & Howell lines in the 1970's. Most of her research was donated to the Spokane Public Library; however, they subsequently lost it. She also sent letters, etc. with genealogical info to Donald Lee Garner & his parents, & to Lori (Garner) Elmore. She wrote "Index to Roster of Ohio Soldiers War of 1812", self-published, Spokane, 1974.
      Page: b 1898 in Newtonia, Newton Co, MO
    8. Title: Birth Certificate
      Abbrev: Official Document
      Repository:
        Name: Jay Garner's files.

      Page: Birth Cert for John Philip Garner
    9. Title: Social Security Death Benefit Records: Brøderbund Family Archive # 110, Subject: Social Security Death Benefit Records, Url: http://www.familytreemaker.com/
      Abbrev: SS Death Benefits
      Publication: Brøderbund BannerBlue Division
      Page: Vol. 1 Surnames Beginning with G, Internal Ref # 1.111.3.75766.156
    10. Title: The Washington Ancestry & Records of McClain, Johnson & Forty Other Colonial American Families, Volume: Chart: The Ancestry of Mourning Adams Garner, pp 54-55, Vol I, three volume set
      Abbrev: Washington Ancestry & Record
      Author: Charles Arthur Hoffin
      Publication: Yale University Press, 1932
      Page: d 1967, no place
    11. Title: Garner, Dora (Glisson), Interviewer: J.H. Garner, Informant Address: 3208 Pine Creek Rd., Pinehurst, ID 83850
      Abbrev: Garner, Dora (Glisson)
      Author: Dora Garner
      Publication: 14 Feb 2000
    12. Title: Wikipedia The Free Encyclopedia, Url: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page
      Abbrev: Wikipedia Free Encyclopedia
    13. Title: Miscellaneous
      Abbrev: Miscellaneous
      Page: dailyperspective@newspaperarchive.com
    14. Title: Millwee, Norma Fern (Willard), Compiler Address: 4011 Kiva Trail S.W., Las Lunas, NM 87031-9707
      Abbrev: Millwee, Norma Fern (Willard)
      Author: Millwee, Norma Fern (Willard)
      Note:
      Norma Fern Willard & Clyde Millwee's letters, notes & computer files.
      Page: as told to her by Harold Garner

  • Index | Descendancy | Register | Pedigree | Ahnentafel | Download GEDCOM | Public Profile | Add Post-em | View Post-em (1)

    "The providence of God, which keeps up the generations of men, and so preserves that degenerate race, though guilty and obnoxious, in being upon earth. As one generation, even of sinful men, passes away, another comes (Eccl 1:4; Num 32:14), and will do so while the earth remains. Destroy it not, for a blessing is in it." --Matthew Henry

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