some KELLY MONK CAVAYE BRUEN EVANS HAMILTON TORRANCE FRIEDLANDER ancestry, and the kinsfolk of Alexander COWAN

Entries: 19041    Updated: 2013-01-02 18:07:08 UTC (Wed)    Contact: Roger    Home Page: website links

Names here all interconnect. For some information about this tree, look up KOSMOID in its alphabetic index

Index | Descendancy | Register | Pedigree | Ahnentafel | Public Profile | Add Post-em

  • ID: I7510
  • Name: Thomas BLAKE
  • Given Name: Thomas
  • Surname: Blake
  • Sex: M
  • Death: Aft 1820 bef 1841
  • Note:
    Noted as living on his son W.N. Blakes marriage certificate in 1841.
    This is odd,

    MARRIAGES at Hales:
    1810 no.58
    Thomas Blake of the Parish of Bergh Apton and Elizabeth Nichols of this Parish both single persons were married in this church by licence this Twentieth Day of February in the year One Thousand Eight Hundred and Ten by me John Penn Minister.
    This Marriage was solemnised between us) Thomas Blake / Elizabeth Nichols
    In the Presence of ) Jane Blake / Sarah Nichols
    =================================================
    The previous entry was notable for the witnesses too:
    no 57:
    Joseph Jennings of the parish single man and Elizabeth Buck of the same parish single woman were married in this church by licence this 17th Feb 1807 by John Penn Minister In the presence of Maryann Nichols and William Nichols
    =======================================
    BAPTISMS at Hales
    Feb 4th 1787 Sarah daughter of William and Ann Nicholls (late Mickleburgh widow formerly Fisher spinster born 20th Jan. Baptised privately this day. Recd into Church July 26. Indented to May 4 1787 John Penn Minister
    ====================================================================Feb 26th 1788. Maryann daughter of William and Ann Nicholls (late Mickleburgh widow, formerly Ann Fisher spinster) born 23rd instant , baptised privately this day. Recd into the Church March 2. Indented May 9th 1788. John Penn Minister.
    ====================================================================
    Jan 26th 1790. Elizabeth, daughter of William and Ann Nicholls (late Mickleburgh widow formerly Fisher spinster) born ye 15th baptised privately ye day. Recd into the church Oct 10th. Indented to May 1790. John Penn Minister.
    ====================================================================
    Looking further back - and forth - in the register we found these too: Feb 10th 1788
    Sarah, daughter of Robert and Lorina Buck (Late Lorina Fisher spinster) born 31st Jan. Baptised privately this day.
    ========================================================
    April 3rd 1781 Eliz. daughter of Ellis and Ann Mickleburgh.....John Penn.
    =========================================================
    Dec 6th 1780 Ann, daughter of Ellis and Ann Mickleburgh.
    ==========================================
    Jan 15th 1758, Lorina, daughter of John and Elizabeth Fisher
    ==============================================
    1753 William, son of William and Mary Fisher?? from ?? Homesfield, Suffolk. was
    baptised October 7th 1753. Bill given us.
    ==============================================
    1749 Ann, daughter of John and Elizabeth Fisher was baptised June 26th 1749
    ======================================================
    BURIALS at Hales
    June 10th 1801. Elizabeth, wife of John Mickleburgh (late Denny) aged 56.
    ====================================================
    April 10th 1805, John son of John and Elizabeth Mickleburgh (late Denny) aged 32
    ====================================================
    1807. John, son of Matthew and Elizabeth Mickleburgh (late Ellis) 64
    =======================================================
    July 29th 1813 William Nichols aged 2 yrs.
    ========================================
    July 2nd 1814 (?) Anna Blake, abode Loddon. infant.
    =========================================
    Oct 9th 1816 Jane Blake, abode Loddon, daughter of Thomas and Elizabeth, 8 months.ceremony James Wall
    ============================================================
    Oct 19th 1817 Sarah Blake, abode Loddon, daughter of Thomas and Elizabeth, 5
    months.
    ========================================================
    May 29th 1830 William Nichols, abode Hales, aged 67 years. James Wall Curate.
    =========================================================
    May 21st 1832 Sarah Nichols, abode Hales, aged 45 years.
    ========================================================
    Jan 30th 1836, Elizabeth Blake, abode Hales, 16 years.(could this be ours?
    if it were a mistaken reading for 46 yrs?)
    ==============================================
    March 16th 1838, Lorina Buck, widow, abode Hales, aged 81 years.
    ===============================================
    more MARRIAGES 1786
    no 26. William Nichols of this Parish Batchelor and Ann Mickleburgh of same parish widow were married in this church by licence the 27th Day of July in the year seventeen hundred and eighty six by me John Penn Minister. Solemnised by us) William Nichols / Ann Mickleburgh In the presence of) Roger Eaton / Lorina Fisher
    =====================================================
    26th October 1802 no 51. Charles Crowfoot of Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk
    married Mary Nichols of this parish. witnesses: Elizabeth Buck / William Wilson
    ===========================================
    3oth April 1804. John Mickleburgh m Mary Eade ============================================
    22nd Oct 1848 Herbert Howlett, Butcher of Beeston m Sarah Fisher daughter of Robert Fisher, Blacksmith, Hales.
    =====================================================
    July 17th 1870 Jonathan Nicholles, blacksmith, Hales, m Maria Elizabeth Crickmore, Hales witnesses) Noah Nicholls, Labourer/ Jonathan Bickman.
    ================================================

    Norfolk Chronicle & Norwich Gazette January 11th 1902.
    Norfolk and Norwich "Notes and Queries"
    (407) A farmer near Loddon assured me recently that it was a firm belief in
    the district that snails either made into a soup or boiled in milk was a
    sure cure for consumption. W. B. Gerish
    (409) OLD NORFOLK SONG - I heard the following excellent old song well sung
    in character at a recent farmers' dinner in Norfolk and by the courtesy of
    the singer and a friend am enabled to send it to you. If anyone hears any
    similar songs I would suggest he should send them to you to preserve in
    type:-

    I once was never satisfied
    With how the cash was laid out,
    I thought for once I would provide
    To see how it was paid out;
    for money goes so precious fast,
    It almost drove me raving:
    I said to my wife, "Dear Julia,
    Let us both try for saving."

    Chorus-
    My wife did chaff, the boys did laugh,
    The neighbours all did lark it;
    and with my basket on my arm,
    I toddled off to market.

    When scarce I had got down the street,
    When up came neighbour Canny;
    He said, "It is your turn to treat,
    Come, spend your market penny."
    Away we toddled to the Crown,
    For drinks I did feel craving;
    At skittles I lost half a crown.
    Look, what a precious saving.

    Chorus-
    My wife did chaff, &c.

    When they found the beer and ale
    Had got into my noddle,
    They pinned a dish-cloth to my tail,
    and called me Molly coddle.
    As down the street I tried to pass,
    I got tripped on the paving,
    I fell backwards on a box of eggs.
    Look, what a precious saving.

    Chorus-
    My wife did chaff, &c.

    A butcher's shop I next went to,
    To buy a pound of bacon;
    And hoped misfortune there would end,
    But I found myself mistaken,
    For the butcher being a sly old rough,
    Must have a heart quite stony,
    To sell me that for tender meat,
    He knew was tough and bony.
    And to his trips I being strange,
    To all his tricks and cavings;
    He forgot to give me back my change.
    Look, what a precious saving.

    Chorus-
    My wife did chaff, &c.

    A grocer's shop I next went in,
    And there another shock met;
    A man came in and collared me,
    And said I'd picked his pocket.
    The police came in the cause to learn,
    And took me to the station, the next day being Sunday,
    So would not let me change my clothes
    Till twelve o'clock on Monday.
    The men of strife, through all your life,
    To all these tricks and cavings:
    If you take the shopping from your wife,
    you will lose instead of saving.

    Chorus-
    For your wife will laugh,
    And the boys will chaff,
    And the neighbours all will lark it;
    So you may take your basket on your arm,
    And toddle off to market

    -WALTER RYE
    from Norfolk Chronicle & Norwich Gazette January 11th 1902.



    Raveningham Marriages
    Benjamin Blake of this parish, single man and Mary GATES ? of this parish single woman married in this church by Banns 15 May 1763

    An April 2004 researcher writes:
    "Land Tax records are most useful. These are on fiches and cover every year from 1794. Norfolk is a county of Parishes - 800?? so I stuck to Loddon this time. I peeped at Carleton St Peter but didn't see a Thomas Blake, only: 1800 John Blake (occupier) proprietor : Proctor. sum: 12 shillings.

    Loddon Land Registers.
    I checked to see if Thomas BLAKE appeared after 1820. He didn't.
    1821-no Blakes.
    1819 Tho. Blake late Cooper. Occupier: Foreman James.
    1820 Blake Tho' late Cooper. Occupier: Foreman James. rent...

    date, owner, occupier, amount
    25/3/1820 Blake Tho' Late Cooper. James Foreman.
    1819 Blake Thos, James Foreman.
    1818 Blake Thos Late Cooper, Himself, 4/-
    1817 Blake Thos, himself.
    1816,Blake Thos, Late Cooper Esqr, Himself.
    1815, Blake Thos. Late Cooper Esq, Himself.
    1814 Blake Tho' late Cooper Esq.
    1813 Blake Tho' Late Cooper Esq, himself.
    1812 Cooper Thos, Esq, Barnfellow Edward.
    1811 Cooper Thos Esq, Barnfellow Edward.
    1810 Blake Thos Esq. Brown Wm.
    1809 Blake Thos Esq, William Brown.
    1808 Cooper Thos, Bonfellow Edw.
    1807 Blake Thos Esqr Brown Wm
    1806 Blake Thos Esq Brown Wm.
    Cooper Thos, Bonfellow.
    1805 Blake Thos Esq. Brown Wm.
    Cooper Thos Esq Bonfellow.
    1804 Blake Thos Esq Brown
    Cooper Thos Esq Bonfellow
    1803 Blake Thos Esq Brown. Wm.
    1802 Blake Thos Esq Brown Wm.
    Cooper Thos Esq Bonfellow
    1801 Blake Thos Esq Brown.
    Cooper Thos Esq Bonfellow.
    1800 Blake Thos Esq, Browne late.....
    Cooper Thos Esq ed Bonfellow G...y (illeg)
    1799 Cooper Samuel
    Nichols Peter
    1798 x
    1797 x
    1796 illegible
    1794 and 5. hardly any pages and I couldn't read anything!

    "I was fascinated by the "Late Cooper Esqr" beside Thomas Blake's name and have been pondering this. Did he change his name? If so, why? But then I saw there was also a Thomas Cooper. I asked the archivist but she wasn't a lot of help. Norfolk Archives is brand new and very smart, staffed by young girls who agreed with my first suggestion that people occasionally changed their names to their mother's or to inherit.
    But maybe one man was just taking over the other's land I reflected.

    "Next I had a look at the 1841 Loddon Census. I have seen this before but it was a much clearer film. However I didn't see anything new! By 1841 our Blakes had gone from Loddon.
    A few notes:
    At The Hall, Loddon: Sarah Nichols, 65, farmer, Yes (born in county)
    Hannah Nichols, 40 ditto
    At Carleton, Claxton on the farm of Robert Lacey was William Blake 20 M.S. yes.
    Maria Ellis 20, F.S. yes.

    "I scribbled out pages of notes which are not terribly interesting and by
    then I was so tired I stopped for lunch. Refreshed in the afternoon. I found the Loddon Overseers Account Book 1801 - 1822, Reference: MF/X/263/1 Loddon 1817:
    Rate or Apportionment for necessary Relief of the Poor in the said parish of the County of Norfolk and for the purposes mentioned in the several acts of parliament relating to the Poor from Easter 1816 to Easter 1817 at 3 shillings and eightpence in the pound for the year.
    Blake Thos £11. 4/7
    ####################################
    I saw a reference to Thomas Blake on several years and his signature
    appeared regularly on the list of Parish Overseers. I have asked for a printout of one of these entries; they will post it to me.

    Here is an example from the books: 1819
    For carrying John Green to hospital 10s.
    Paid Mr Fisher £104 - 9 -6
    Allowed J Carver 3 days 2/6
    Relieved old Dow 3 days 3/-
    Overseers Salary £10/9/-
    Journey to Norwich 10/-
    Paid Mr Fisher £87/1/3
    (who is this Mr Fisher!!!)

    "I decided to order up 3 maps and while I waited for them to be brought from storage I looked in the book Norfolk Annals.

    "18/5/1826 Died at his lodgings at Yarmouth, aged 86 Mr Roger Hays of
    Norwich, former Captain in the 11th Light Dragoons and many years adjutant
    of the East Norfolk Yeomanry Cavalry. He entered the army in 1760 and was on
    duty with the Household Troops at the coronation of George III
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    "24th Jan 1823
    Capt Hayes "The father of the British Army" was entertained at the Star Inn,
    Norwich on the anniversary of his entrance into the service. he has served
    62 years.
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    "The maps arrived. Tithe Maps of 1841 for Loddon and for Howe & Poringland.
    A field map of 1810 for Loddon. The tithe maps are wonderful. Each field is named and numbered. Thomas Cooper was a major landowner in Loddon. (but who was he? and how come he was still around in 1841 and where is Thomas Blake??)
    In Howe & Poringland tithe map 1841
    Owner:.John Blake Esqr occupier: James Shorter
    a list of fields amounting to about 21 acres
    North Poringland:
    Rev. Robert Cooper, owner: West Poringland Glebe. Occupier: James Shorter.
    also Howe Glebe, occupier: himself amounting to 56 acres.

    "There are so many other "facts" I could have added but 5 pm came and I had
    to leave. Meanwhile, just found this on the internet:

    "LODDON ASSOCIATION 1812
    For Apprehending and Prosecuting Thieves, for indemnifying each other against Losses by Theft, and granting Rewards on the Conviction of Offenders.
    AT a Meeting of the Members at Loddon Swan Inn, the 16th of December, 1812, the Rules of the Society were ratified, and several Contributions towards Losses paid.
    WM. UTTING, Treasurer.
    MEMBERS.
    ---------------------Arminghall:
    Mr. Robert George
    ----------------------.Ashby:
    Mr. Robert Monsey
    ------------Bergh Apton:
    Mr. Robert Batchelder
    Robert Freston
    C. Tompson, Esq.
    -----------------------Bungay:
    Mr. Thomas Sayer, jun.
    -------------------Carlton next Langley.
    Mr. Thomas Cullum
    William Johnson
    Francis Perkins
    ----------------------Chedgrave.
    Rev. William Hobson
    -----------------------Claxton.
    Mr. Wm. S. Batchelder
    Jeremiah Batchelder
    Wm. Cooke
    ------------------Ellingham.
    Mr. William Hoddy
    -------------------Hales.
    Mr. Robert Buck
    J. Hase's Executors
    James Jennings
    William Nichols
    --------------------Hardley.
    Mr. Joseph Adams, jun.
    Joseph Duffin
    Samuel Goddard
    William Hood
    -----------------------Hedenham.
    Mr. O.G. Clarke's Exrs.
    -------------------------Hellington.
    Mr. Robert Newman
    ---------------------------Langley.
    Mr. Francis Browne
    Thomas Burton, jun.
    Richard Cossey
    John Read
    ------------------------------Loddon.
    Mr. Philip Beard
    Thomas Blake
    Daniel Branch
    E.D. Browne
    E. Bonfellow
    Wm. Burton
    Wm. Dowson
    Wm. Ebden
    John Fisher
    Mr. William George
    Edward Gibbs
    Daniel Hotson
    Guyton Jollye
    William Lamb
    James Lawrence
    William Page
    Samuel Palmer, Esq.
    Mr. J.C. Parkerson
    Thomas Press
    James Shreeve
    John Spence
    Francis Tovell
    Henry Thirkettle
    Robert Ward
    ---------------------Mundham.
    Mr. John Back
    Rev. J. Gilbert
    Mr. Michael Roberts
    ------------------------Postwick.
    Mr. Robert Gilbert
    --------------------Raveningham.
    Mr. James Denny
    ------------------------Reedham.
    Mr. Jeremiah Nichols
    ------------------Rockland.
    Mr. T.B. Crowe
    --------------------Seething.
    Mr. Wm. Crickmore, jun.
    Robert Grimer
    -----------------------Sisland.
    Mr. Wm. Browne
    Osmond Clarke, sen.
    Robert Tibbenham
    -----------------------Stockton.
    Mr. Robert Bonfellow
    ------------------------Thurlton.
    Mr. James Disney
    Thomas Sayer, sen
    -------------------------Thurton.
    Mr. Edward Burton
    John Garnham
    John Minister
    William Utting
    --------------------------Thwaite.
    Mr. Matthew Rackham
    ---------------------------Topcroft.
    Mr. Robert Warmoll
    ---------------------------Trowse.
    Mr. J.P. Garrad
    ::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::::

    "So there we are. Thomas Blake esq was a big noise in Loddon at some time and
    J Hase at Hales, but peoples' fortunes came and went in those days and it's ironic that his son Thomas Hase Blake was later a convict."

    BLAKE and COOPER?

    The distinguished practitioner and surgeon to King George IV Sir Astley Cooper was painted in a three-quarter-length portrait painted by Lawrence in 1828, and now in the collection of the Royal College of Surgeons. Cooper's elder brother, Robert Bransby a member of Parliament was also a patron of Lawrence and had been painted by him in 1813. Cooper was the son of Rev. Samuel Cooper, D.D., curate of Great Yarmouth, and rector of Morley and Yelverton, Norfolk, but a career in the church held no appeal for him, and he followed his grandfather Samuel Cooper, a Norwich surgeon, and his uncle William Cooper surgeon to Guy's Hospital, to whom he was apprenticed in 1784. He was transferred to the care of Henry Cline, surgeon at St Thomas's, who had a great early influence on his protégé. Cline was a man of democratic principals, and Cooper spent some time in Paris in 1792, in the aftermath of the French revolution staying with friends of Cline who were sympathetic with the revolutionary cause. In the following year on his return to England he was chosen to lecture on anatomy at the College of Surgeons, which he continued to do with great success until 1796. In 1800 Cooper succeeded his uncle as Surgeon at Guy's, and with this elevation he abandoned the more radical thinking of his youth. In addition to his work for the hospital and his lecturing he built up the largest private practice of any surgeon in London. He was popular as a lecturer, and acquired an anecdotal notoriety over his pragmatic attitude to the work of the 'resurrection men', whose gruesome and illegal trade supplied doctors with much-needed corpses for dissection. On one occasion he remarked to a Committee of the House of Commons that was investigating body-snatching: 'There is no person, let his situation in life be what it may, whom, if I were disposed to dissect, I could not obtain. The law only enhances the price, and does not prevent the exhumation.' (Dictionary of National Biography) Although in 1804 - 7 Cooper had lost one thousand pounds in the publication of his important two-part treatise Hernia, the ruinous expense arising from the cost of the illustrations, the years after 1806 were the most lucrative of his career, and in one year he made £21,000. On one occasion he received his largest fee of one thousand guineas tossed from a window in a nightcap by a grateful West Indian planter whom he had treated for the stone. In 1813 Cooper was appointed professor of comparative anatomy by the Royal College of Surgeons. In May 1815 he performed the operation that made his name as a surgeon, when he tied the aorta to remedy an aneurism. In 1820 King George IV, recognising him to have been a trusted surgeon to the Prime Minister Lord Liverpool, summoned him to perform a small operation, for which he was rewarded with a baronetcy. Six years later, one year after he became President of the Royal College of Surgeons, he was appointed Surgeon to the King. Cooper died on February 12th 1841 and by his request was buried beneath the chapel of Guy's Hospital. This interment cemented his association with the institution, as well as relflecting, perhaps, his awareness of the potential impermanency of burial in more public places.

    This is not our Thomas:
    1851 census?------------------------------------------------------------------
    Thomas Blake Head. 72. farmer. 60 acres. Born. Carleton st Peter.
    Sarah wife 68 farmers wife born sisland
    Rebecca daur 41 U. born Carleton st peter.
    Mary. daur 40. U born carleton st peter.
    Address. Church Road, Loddon.
    c/place. Carleton st peter

    IGI Individual Record FamilySearch™ International Genealogical Index v5.0
    THOMAS BLAKE Male
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Event(s): Birth:Christening: 22 FEB 1778 Carleton St. Peter, Norfolk, England
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Parents: Father: JOHN BLAKE Mother: MARY
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Source Information: Batch Number: 8300792
  • Change Date: 23 OCT 2007 at 23:06:41



    Father: Thomas HASE b: 22 DEC 1747 in Bergh Apton
    Mother: Anna BLAKE

    Marriage 1 Elizabeth NICHOLS b: 15 JAN 1790 in Hales (Norfolk) England c: 26 JAN 1790 in Hales (Norfolk) England
    • Married: 20 FEB 1810 in Hales (Norfolk) England
    • Note:
      Thomas Blake = Elizabeth Nichols 20.02.1810 Hales
      MARRIAGES at Hales:
      1810 no.58
      Thomas Blake of the Parish of Bergh Apton and Elizabeth Nichols of this Parish both single persons were married in this church by licence this Twentieth Day of February in the year One Thousand Eight Hundred and Ten by me John Penn Minister.
      This Marriage was solemnised between us) Thomas Blake / Elizabeth Nichols
      In the Presence of ) Jane Blake / Sarah Nichols

      Thomas Blake = Elizabeth Nichols 20.02.1810 Hales
      MARRIAGES at Hales:
      1810 no.58
      Thomas Blake of the Parish of Bergh Apton and Elizabeth Nichols of this Parish both single persons were married in this church by licence this Twentieth Day of February in the year One Thousand Eight Hundred and Ten by me John Penn Minister.
      This Marriage was solemnised between us) Thomas Blake / Elizabeth Nichols
      In the Presence of ) Jane Blake / Sarah Nichols
    Children
    1. Has Children William Nichols BLAKE b: 12 JAN 1811 in Berghapton,Norfolk c: 7 FEB 1811 in Bergh Apton,Norfolk
    2. Has Children Thomas Hase BLAKE b: 28 MAY 1812 in Bergh Apton (Norfolk) England c: 3 JUN 1812 in Bergh Apton (Norfolk) England
    3. Has No Children George BLAKE c: 25 JUL 1813 in Holy Trinity,Loddon (Norfolk) England
    4. Has Children Ann BLAKE b: in Kirby Cane near Loddon,Norfolk? c: 21 JAN 1815 in Holy Trinity,Loddon (Norfolk) England
    5. Has No Children Jane BLAKE c: 3 MAR 1816 in Holy Trinity,Loddon (Norfolk) England
    6. Has No Children Sarah BLAKE c: 4 JUN 1817 in Holy Trinity,Loddon (Norfolk) England

  • Index | Descendancy | Register | Pedigree | Ahnentafel | Public Profile | Add Post-em

    Welcome to descendants of John YOUNG (Jock the Genius) and Christina CLAPPERTON in Australia and USA; Welcome to descendants of Midlothian TORRANCEs worldwide. Greetings to CAVAYE family members (Cavaye family reunions held in Edinburgh 1964, 1984, 2000, Australia 2003, 2004: Dorothy CAVAYEs book on the family origins "Need a Body Cry" published by Librario). Welcome to Rangoon FRIEDLANDERs, Loddon BLAKEs and Corton COLEs, to Manx, to Orcadians, and to all connected with the COWAN papermaking family.

    Printer Friendly Version Printer Friendly Version Search Ancestry Search Ancestry Search WorldConnect Search WorldConnect Join Ancestry.com Today! Join Ancestry.com Today!

    WorldConnect Home | WorldConnect Global Search | WorldConnect Help

    RootsWeb.com, Inc. is NOT responsible for the content of the GEDCOMs uploaded through the WorldConnect Program. If you have a problem with a particular entry, please contact the submitter of said entry. You have full control over your GEDCOM. You can change or remove it at any time.