Tlingit, Haida and Tsimshian genealogy of Alaska

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In memory of Kha'Jaq'tii 1908-2011

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  • ID: I12006
  • Name: Adam Grant HORNE
  • Given Name: Adam Grant
  • Surname: Horne
  • Sex: M
  • _UID: 1BBC085102D1481DA6AFCEE0255EF1CCABB2
  • Change Date: 19 OCT 2013
  • Note:
    This information is from several articles and obituaries I have in my possesion. Information on children from a copy of written family records.

    Adam Grant Horne was born in Edinburg in 1829, but was raise in Kirkwall, Orkney Islands. He was able to joing the services of the Hudson Bay Company as a Storekeeper-clerk. He sailed away for the Colony of Vancouver Island on board the brig "Tory" and arrived in Victoria in 1851.

    Without further delay, he was sent north to the Compay post of Fort Rupert where he was to remain until 1853, when he was sent to Nanaimo, to take charge of the Company Store and Wharehouse. His first home was a Company house almost directly across from the store and he shared the place with George Mitchell.

    Adam Horne was keenly interested in adventure and listened to the tales of trappers and prospectors. His duties at the store kept him occupied, but he would await the time and place to do what he witshed to do.

    North of Nanaimo about 40 miles in Qualicum River, the stie today of the Provincial Fish Hatchery. The source of the river in Horne Lake and was know to the Indians as "Enk-sa-sent". The flow of this river is regulated by lookd gates and a tunnel that diverts the original flow, leaving the river bed dry. In the winter months the lake level rises to the extent that it reaches the floors of the cabins built at the original high water mark. During the summer months the water level lowers to the extent taht many boats have their ramps left high and dry. It was this area that Adam Grant Horne was to explore.

    Very little was known about the interior of Vancouver Island in 1855. A report had been received by Governor Duglas that a tribe ofIndians existed inland of the island with no access to either east or west coasts because of hostile tribes on both sides.

    The Hudson Bay Company wanted to ascertain the facts that two previous expeditions had been unable to do. In 1854, Captain Sturart had replaced J.W.McKay as the Officer in charge at Nanaimo. He had been instructed to continue with expolations whenever possible. One day in May, 1855,Governorr James Douglas visited Nanaimo, so Adam asked permission to speak to the governor about going out on the next expolation trip. The Governor sized up the 6foot 3 inch young man, weighing in at 200 ibs. and 24 years old, and asked him several questions. Satisfied withthe answers, the Governor gave Horne permission to lead the next expedition.

    Caaptian Sturt was viven orders to fit Adam Horne and his party out with a caner, and supplies, and tell him to seek out the rail from the east coast it the wast coast. Horne was allowed to choose his own men, so he chose two French Canadians, and the Governor's personal guide, Tomo.

    At first, Adam tried to hire several local tribesmen, but they refused to go. He learned that the Indians had trouble before with northern tribes u the coast and did not want to have anything to do with them.

    On the 25th of May, the canoe was pddled up the coast by the two French Canadians. As they approaced the mouth of the Qualicum River, Tomo sighted smoke spiraling above the tops of the trees. He made a sign to make for shore, and Adam had learned never to question Tomo, so gave the orders to beach the canoe, then had it covered over with brush.

    Adam and Tomo left the others behind under coer while they crept through the underbrush to a place ovelooking the encampment of th Qualicums. Adam was horrified to larn that he was unable to assist in any way and had to be restrained by Tomo. Agroup of maruaders wiped out he tribe, taking prisoners, leaving the others dead or dying.

    Horne decided it would be wiser to return to Nanaimo to report the incident. When Governor Doughlas learned of this atrocitym he immediately banned futher expolation wuntil the danger of possible uprising was quelled.

    It was not until 1856 that Adam Grant Horne was to outfit another expedition to find the trail over the mountains. Governor Douglas returned to Nanaimo in July 1856 and Adam again sought permission to speak to the Governor. Wtihout further word, he asked the governor to give permission to try to find the trail. The Governor asked, "Are you not afraid?" to which Adam replied "No", and received the permission "Then you shall go"

    Captian Stuart recieived instructions from the Governor to supply Horne with the supplies required, a canoe, and be allowed to choose his own men.

    Thus begins the narrative of Adam Grant Horne.

    I had to get some Indians to go with me, but I had no luck trying to induce tem to come. I learned that, as before, they did not want to have any trouble with the upcoast Indians.

    A few days later, I found an Indian who had a wife that had been kinappped many years before as a child. She was : both willing to go along with her husband, and be our interpreter when we got there. The governore persoally sent me his guide, Tomo, who I knew fro my previous expedition.

    It was a month later that we left Nanaimo in a ssmall canoe headed north to the mouth of the Quallicum River. Tomo thought it best to conceal the canoe i nthe brush, so we pulled ashore, hauled the canoe out othte water, revoced the supplies, and carefully his the canoe.

    We traveled through rough brush for half a dya until we arrived at the shore of a lake. We rested, then made a raft to travel the lake to the distant shore. We climbed up a rise until we reched the top where we rested and could see the waters of the distant Pacific Ocean.

    I took out my compass to use going through the woods until we came to a river that empties into the distant sound, and continued to follow the river to the forks where we decided to spend the night, and made camp.

    I was exhausted, so slept soundly until a sharp noise awoke me with a start. I woke up Tomo and the other tow and moved slowly towards the rive. There were three Indian canoes with two Indians in each paddling up river towards us. I went back to the camp and told Tomo while the Indian and his wife hid in the bush. Tomo stood up and walked boldly towards the riever where he could be seen by the strangers, called out and beckoned them to join us.

    The strangers were taken by surprise when they saw us both for they let out howls, like wolves and made for the opposite bank anut 150 yards from us. I tried everything that I cold think of to coax them across the river but it was no use. Instead, the kept jumping up and down, brandishing their bows and arrows, showing us what they were going to do to us.

    Tomo whent back to the camp, lit a fire, brewed some tea, prepared bisquits right in front of the hostiles, ignoring their threats. This did not work, so I got the Indian to bring out his wife, and show themselves. When the hostiles saw the woman, they quietened down at once, spoke to each other in their dialet, and sign language. Evidently the danger was over, but not one of them would venture across the rive.

    I motioned Tomo, the Indian and his wife to bring out pipesand toacco and join me. I held up a pipe and tobacco, beckoned them to come over for a pipeful which was usually the sign of peace. At long last, on ventured across the river wile his cimpanions waited.

    I offered the stranger a pipe of tobacco, followed by Tomo passing over his pipe. Tea a bisquits followed after I sampled everything first, and we were ssoon on good terms. The stranger left to bring the others over for the same cource that he had enjoyed. We all settled down for the night in front of the fire, but I sill kept a watchful eye all night.

    In the morning we had breadkfast, then got into the canoes to go up river to the Falls where to were to stay and rest. One of our new freinds left us to go ahead to tell the chief of our arrival.

    Shortly afterwards, the Chief and a party of his men came down to us, made sign language to Tomo and the two Indians. It was t my astonishment that I was picked u bodily and carried along, for I was considered to be the leader. I told Tomo to bring our two Indians and goods for I did not want any of us or or supplies to be separated.

    We were given one end of te Chief's house to ourselves where we could freshen ourselves after a long trek. New cedar mats were used to sit upon, then a bain of water to wash out hands before eating, as was the Indian custom. The Cheif had slamon brought in freshly caught at the river nad we watched the fish put on sticks and covered over by hot coals of the fire before us.

    When we had first apppeared, I noticed that all th women in camp fled int the bushes. As we sat there eating, they swarmed all ove us. Several of the women commenced to take something out ot their hair and put it into my hair, which I could not stand, I larned this was a way of showing their friendship.

    After the last bite of foos, I prsented the th Cheif and his wife a pipe and tobacco, beads, and other gifts. I turned in later for I was in need of much sleeep, leaving Tomo to keep watch.

    The next mornig, I showed th Cheirf how my fifle killed by downing tow crows in quick succession, shich greatly impressed him. The Chief and five of his men took me alnong to the far end of the lake where I shot and killed a beaver aht dressed to 31/2 lbs. While standing at the head of the lake, I noticed another lake in the distance, paused in my thoughts to ponder over this vey thoruoughly. I realized I was with the Indian tribe that was so feared by so many. I heard of this tribe plundering as far as Puntlas Lake and were known as the Lake Indians" and were feared by the east coast Indians.

    Through Tomo I learned that the tribe I was with had traed with other tribes encmaped between the lake and the palce know to them as Shestrate. They were greatly outnumnbered so were not feared by the Indian traders who cheated them, giving them only a fraction in trade goods and blankets.

    When I returned to the village, I asked the Chief to see some of his prime pelts. I was greatly impressed by so many, and since I had only a limited supply of trade goods, and one canoe, I picked out the very best and lightest pelts.

    I gave the Cheif the same prices I paid for in Nanaimo whch plased him greatly, and was suprised to be treated fairly instead of being cheated. I sold eveything I owned including my blandkets, withte exception of pistol an rifle.

    After the business had ended, I spoke to the Chief for several hours afterwards through Tomo and the tw Indians, I soon learned the Cheif was known as High pen milth. I presented him with Tomo's new musket, powder, shot and flint, then Tomo showed the Chief how to use the musket.

    When it was time to leave, I managed to convey to the Chief that I would be back as soon as possible with more men and canoes, to trade.

    Chief High pen miltqh and several of his men accopanied us to a shorter trail. He said it would take us home an dreturn much faster. At the top of the mountain, the Cheif and I parted company, with more farewells and the promise of a quick return.

    I was the first white man the Lake Indians had ever seen.

    In 1862 the Vancouver Coal Company took over the mines and stor of the Hudson Bay Company and Mr. Horne opened up in business for himself, erecting a new building in town. After some years he again went in to the service of the Hudson Bay Company and was stationed at Fort Simpson. He was next sent to Comox where he was given charge of the establishment.

    In 1878 he left the Hudson Bay Company, and a second time entered into business for himself. He then put up the building on Victoria Cresecet, and for years carried on a business there, retiring a few years before his death.

    During his long connection with eht Hudson Bay Company., Mr. Horne became very well acquainted withthe various Indian tribes, gaining a great influence over them. Upon more that one occasion this was used to the advantage of the Company and of the Civil Authorities, as he was made the intermediary in connection with diaputes that had arisen. On one occasion he accpmanid a gunboat who had commietted atrocities at Salt Spring Island. The Indians resisted arrest and it was found necessary to bombard their camp before making the arrest.

    In public life, Mr. Horne also took a deep interest. He served as a Alderman of th City and ever evinced the keenest consideration for the advancement of Nanaimo.

    Horne Lake on the Island was named after him as the discoverer of it upon one of his many expeditions across Vancouver Island.

    Additional information was provided by Joel Thomas Anderton via the Internet, 11 and 12 Nov 2001.

    He attended the University of Glascow. As was common in those days a person did not necessary take a degree, per se, unless it was required by their profession.

    Horne was the Hudson Bay factor at Nanaimo and Fort Simpson, BC. As factor, he also served as the local Justice of the Peace, the JP at the time was more in line with today's Provincial Court Judge.
  • Birth: 1 JAN 1829 in Edinburg,Scotland
  • Death: Y



    Marriage 1 Elizabeth BATE
    • Note:
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    • Married: 22 FEB 1859 in Nanaimo British Coloumbia
    Children
    1. Has Children Sarah Maria Simpson HORNE b: 1 JAN 1867 in Fort Simpson Nanaimo,B.C.
    2. Has No Children Adam Henry HORNE b: 9 DEC 1859 in Nanauro,B.C.
    3. Has No Children Ann Elizabeth HORNE b: 23 JAN 1862 in Nanauro,B.C.
    4. Has No Children Lucy Amandia HORNE b: 15 JAN 1865 in Fort Simpson,British Columbia,Canada
    5. Has No Children Herbert Lewis HORNE b: 28 JUN 1869 in comofe
    6. Has No Children Higmus Charlas HORNE b: 7 JUN 1870 in comofe
    7. Has No Children Emily Maude HORNE b: 8 FEB 1874 in comofe
    8. Has No Children Lucy Bate HORNE b: 7 OCT 1875 in Nanauro,British Columbia,Canada
    9. Has No Children David William HORNE b: 13 MAR 1878 in comofe
    10. Has No Children George Grant HORNE b: 31 JAN 1881 in Nanauro,B.C.
    11. Has No Children Tinlie Dallas HORNE b: 21 MAR 1883 in Nanauro,B.C.

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