Mansfield-Perkins Ancestry

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  • ID: I10
  • Name: George Edward Janes
  • Title: Jr.
  • Sex: M
  • Birth: 26 APR 1863 in Baldwinsville, , New York
  • Death: 10 DEC 1952 in Wessington Springs, Jerauld County, South Dakota
  • Burial: 12 DEC 1952 Prospect Hill Cemetery, Wessington Springs, Jerauld County, South Dakota
  • Note:
    The following write up was sent to Margaret Janes by Juanita Sinkie who
    is one of our cousins.

    GEORGE EDWARD JANES
    George Edward Janes was born to George and Marietta (Nickerson)
    Janes near Syracuse, NY on Apr. 26, 1863. He immigrated by covered
    wagon pulled by an ox team to Dakota Territory in 1876, with his father and
    brother. They homesteaded at Milltown, SD, near Parkston. His mother
    and the other children came to Dakota Territory by rail to Sioux City, Iowa
    the next year. The trip to Milltown was made by team and
    wagon.
    The Janes family built a dam for water power on the James River in
    1879 and established the Janes Mill near their home. It was young
    George's job to run the mill that ground grain for the farmers of the
    neighborhood to be used as flour and cereal for the family and as feed for
    the animals. (George was better known as "Ed" so as not to confuse him
    with his father.) One incident Ed often told of these days happened in an
    electrical storm, Ed was sacking grain from the spout when a bolt of
    lightning struck the mill. He was thrown across the mill onto sacks of
    grain. All his life he was afraid of lightning.
    Ed was united in marriage to Isabel Sterling, a neighbor girl, in 1883.
    The couple moved to Dale Township near Wessington Springs, where Ed
    worked for C.J. Bliss on his ranch in the early 1900's. Here Ed was
    responsible for the feeding and shipping of the fattened cattle to the
    markets at Chicago and Kansas City. The cattle were driven to the railroad
    station at Wessington Springs where they were loaded onto
    cars. Ed rode in the car with the cattle or in the caboose to see that the
    cattle were fed and watered on the way. He then sold the cattle and
    returned home by rail.
    It was while he worked on the Bliss ranch, that several tradgedies
    happened that changed his life. His oldest daughter was accidentally
    shot and killed in 1903 at a neighbors place. That same year his wife
    was warming milk for a new baby over a kerosene lamp. She left the
    kettle set down on the chimney causing the lamp to explode. She was
    badly burned and died a few weeks later. In 1904 a young son died of
    consumption. After this the older sons went out on their own, the
    daughters were taken in by several families as was the younger son, the
    baby was taken by Ed's brother and his wife. A firm believer in GOD and
    a man of great faith he was able to carry on.
    In 1905 Ed homesteaded in Lyman County near Westover, south of
    Murdo, SD. By this time he was joined by his son, Arza. They ranched
    near the Little White River where he proudly raised and bred Kentucky
    Whip horses. These showy horses were bright bay with black manes and
    stockings. He lost six of these prized possessions when they were
    struck by lightning. While he and his son were out west they rode in the
    Last Round-up of that area. He told many accounts of these days when the
    herds of cattle that roamed free in the hills along the White River
    were rounded up.
    When he moved back to the Wessington Springs area, he brought back a
    stallion and several mares of the Kentucky Whip Stock. He then worked
    several ranches, one was the George Wallace ranch in Marlar Township.
    Wallace raised Aberdeen Angus cattle and Spotted Poland China hogs.
    This was in WWI days so business was profitable. In 1916 Ed and Arza
    formed a partnership with Wallace. After Arza was married in 1917
    they continued the partnership for a number of years. When the
    partnership was disssolved Ed and Arza continued to raise Aberdeen
    Angus cattle and hogs. Ed was responsible for the hog business and of
    course found time to herd cattle as riding his horse, Teddy was the joy
    of his life. Ed lived through prosperous times and the depression. The days
    of grasshoppers, dust and Morman Crickets were events he could
    well remember.
    One incident the family remembers happened when a flash flood
    occurrred to the north and west of his home. The water came rushing
    down the creek. The creek ran through the yard near the house. Netting
    wire came with the raging water and wrapped around the house. In order to
    save the house, Arza held Grandpa Janes out the kitchen window by his legs
    and he clipped the wire so it could go both ways around the house
    and on down the creek. The house was saved and Grandpa Ed was the
    hero.
    Another incident well remember was not a happy day. Ed had ached
    with rheumatism for several years and it was gradually getting worse.
    On a trip to the doctor he was told "no more riding horseback". To say
    the least, the old cowboy was very unhappy, but no curse words crossed his
    lips. He was undaunted, in order to be with the cattle and be useful
    to the family, he rigged up a two wheel cart and trained his faithful
    riding horse to pull it. Life continued with herding cattle and bringing
    the cattle in from the pasture. He became a skilled cowboy at cutting
    cattle in his cart with his dog Jack.
    Some other events in the life of Grandpa Ed that are remembered by
    the family are---He would shoot chicken hawks with the old double
    barrel shot gun and eliminated many of them. While working at Knippling
    ranch, he had ridden 5-6 miles NW of the place. He had dismounted to open
    the gate, for some reason the horse kicked him and broke his leg.
    He got back on the horse and returned to the ranch house. They took him
    to a doctor who set his leg. The leg served him well for many years.
    During the "Dirty Thirties," he was broken hearted to see the stock
    destroyed for lack of feed. After the conditions of the area improved he
    and Arza rebuilt their herd of black cattle. It was during the 30's that
    Ed was in charge of the family heating stove. The fuel was the cow
    chips collected off the pastures and prairies. With cow chips as the
    fuel, ashes were plentiful. He was kept busy carrying in chips, fueling
    the fire, and carrying out ashes. But the family made it through the
    winters and, as they thrived, burned coal again.
    Ed enjoyed being in Mitchell during Corn Palace week. He often visited
    his daughters, who lived in Mitchell, that week.
    Ed was a man of small stature but he had a bass voice. He would chord
    on his old pump organ and sing for the family and especially to the
    grandkids. Some of his songs were "Ole Dan Tucker", "Go Tell Aunt
    Addie", "Wings in the Morning", "Maggie", "Where Has My Little Dog Gone",
    "How great Thou Art", and many other Hymns.
    When the steps in the Arza Janes home became too difficult for him to
    negotiate, he moved to Wessington Springs where he lived at the L.P.
    Wait home and later with Mrs. Augusta Abraham. After a brief illness,
    George Edward Janes passed away in 1952 at the age of 89 years 8
    months. He is buried in the Prospect Hill Cemetary in Wessington
    Springs.
  • Note: A ROUNDUP OF MEMORIES, THIS TIME ABOUT MY GRANDPA
  • Note: BY GRANDSON KEN JANES
  • Note:
    AS I SIT HERE REMEMBERING MY GRANDPA ON MY DADDY'S SIDE
    I SEE HIM ON THIS BIG BAY HORSE THAT HE ALWAYS USED TO RIDE.
    HE LIVED WITH MA AND DAD AND ALL THE REST OF THE CLAN,
    ON A RANCH IN CENTRAL SOUTH DAKOTA ON GOOD OLD PRAIRIE LAND.
    HIS LIFE HAD MORE THAN IT'S SHARE OF TRAGIC SAD EVENTS,
    BUT HE WAS ABLE TO RISE ABOVE THEM AND A MEANINGFUL LIFE HE SPENT
    HE TAUGHT ME MANY THINGS, WHEN I WAS A BOY,
    HOW TO MAKE A BULL WHIP POP AND SNAP AND BUILD A LATH GUN TOY.
    I REMEMBER IN THE EVENING, BY THE OLD OIL LAMP WE WOULD BE
    AND BY THE OLD PUMP ORGAN HE WOULD PUT ME ON HIS KNEE.
    WE WOULD SING "HOW GREAT THOU ART" IN A VOICE DEEP IN BASS,
    IT WOULD MAKE THE RAFTERS RATTLE AND MY HEART WOULD TRULY RACE.
    I RECALL, HE NEVER WENT TO TOWN UNLESS HIS HAIR GREW LONG.
    HE WOULD SOONER STAY AND TEND THE COWS, SEEMS THAT'S WHERE
    HE BELONGED.
    AS THE YEARS CAUGHT UP WITH HIM AND HE COULD RIDE NO MORE,
    HE PUT TOGETHER A ONE HORSE CART AND CONTINUED TO DO HIS CHORES,
    BUT THE TIME DID COME, WHEN HE COULD NO LONGER ROAM,
    AND ON A DAY WHEN THE GRASS WAS GREEN, THE "GOOD LORD"
    CALLED HIM HOME.
  • Note: So far, I do not see George (Edward) in the 1930 Census.
  • Note:
    The following record is found in the 1920 US Census:

    Census Place: (Marlar), Jerauld County, South Dakota
    February 10-11, 1920 (Family number 2 in this district)
    Name Rel Sex Marr Race Age Birth Occupation Father Mother
    Arza Janes Head Male M W 27 SD Farmer NY Scotland
    Laurretta Janes Wife Female M W 22 IA Keeps House Ger WI
    Juanita Janes Dau Female S W 2/12 SD SD IA
    Edward Janes Father Male W W 56 NY Farmer NY NY

    The following record is found in the 1910 US Census:
    (Maria is shown as having had 2 children who are both still living in 1910)
    Census Place: Buffalo Township, Lyman County, South Dakota
    May 3, 1910
    Name Rel Sex Marr Race Age Birth Occupation Father Mother
    Amos S Janes Head Male M W 26 SD Farmer NY Scotland
    Maria M Janes Wife Female M W 25 SD Keeps House NY MI
    May Janes Dau Female S W 5 SD SD SD
    Addie L Janes Dau Female S W 3 CA SD SD
    Edward Janes Father Male W W 47 NY Farmer NY NY

    The following record is found in the 1900 US Census
    (Isabella is shown as having had 6 children and all 6 are still living in 1900)
    Census Place: Plummer, Brule County, South Dakota
    June 4-5, 1900
    Name Rel Sex Marr Race Age Birth Occupation Father Mother
    George E Janes Head Male M W 37 NY Farmer NY NY
    Isabella B Janes Wife Female M W 41 Sco Keeps House Sco Scotland
    Andrew L Janes Son Male S W 17 SD NY Sco
    Amos S Janes Son Male S W 11 SD NY Sco
    Mary A Janes Dau Female S W 9 SD At School NY Sco
    Arza J Janes Son Male S W 8 SD NY Sco
    Cora E Janes Dau Female S W 6 SD NY Sco
    Margaret Janes Dau Female S W 1 SD NY Sco




    Father: George Edward Janes b: 27 MAY 1834 (1833) in Baldwinsville,Onondaga Co.,New York
    Mother: Marietta Osborn Nickerson b: 25 OCT 1842 (1843) in Mexico,Oswego Co.,New York

    Marriage 1 Isabella Black Stirling b: 31 AUG 1866 in Galashills, Scotland
    • Married: 30 MAY 1883 in Hutchinson County, South Dakota
    Children
    1. Has No Children Andrew Law Janes b: April, 1886 (2 AUG 1888?) in Near Parkston,Hutchinson Co.,South Dakota
    2. Has No Children Amos S. N. Janes b: August, 1888 (30 APR 1884?) in Near Parkston,Hutchinson Co.,South Dakota
    3. Has No Children Mary Adelaide Janes b: October, 1890 (1887/1889) in Near Parkston,Hutchinson Co.,South Dakota
    4. Has Children Arza Philip Janes b: December, 1891 (23 DEC 1893) in Near Parkston,Hutchinson Co.,South Dakota
    5. Has Children Cora Miner Janes b: 19 MAY 1894 in Parkston,Hutchinson Co.,South Dakota
    6. Has No Children Margaret Law Janes b: 15 JUN 1898 (1897?) in Near Parkston,Hutchinson Co.,South Dakota
    7. Has No Children Cortiss Bliss Janes b: 1900 in Mitchell,Davison Co.,South Dakota
    8. Has No Children Ida Isbella Janes b: 23 AUG 1903 in Near Wessington,Springs,Jerauld Co.,South Dakota

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