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Sweitzer Ancestry

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  • ID: I1003
  • Name: Simon Essig 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
  • Sex: M
  • Birth: 27 DEC 1754 in near Hagerstown, Cumberland County, Maryland 1 8 9 4 10 6
  • Death: 18 MAR 1852 in Canton, Stark County, Ohio 1 8 11 6
  • Death: 1851 in "97 years old" 12
  • Death: 18 MAR 1851 in "aged 97 years, 2 mo, 21 days" 13
  • Burial: UNKNOWN Warstler Cemetery, Middlebranch, Stark, Ohio (1st row) 13
  • Burial: Zion Cemetery 12
  • Occupation: Blacksmith, farmer. 2 4 9
  • Residence: AFT 10 MAY 1808 Plain, Stark, Ohio, at "The Old Essig Home", just north of the present (1998) Nimmisilla Park in Plain Township 2 14
  • Residence: BEF 10 MAY 1808 Cumberland County, Pennsylvania 2 14
  • Emigration: 10 MAY 1808 From near Hagerstown, Cumberland Co. (southern Pa., Carlisle, inc. 1751, is Co. seat), to Plain Twp., Stark Co., Ohio 1 2 14 15 4 16
  • Emigration: 1804 or 1808; From Cumberland County, Pennsylvania to Plain Twp., Ohio 7 17
  • Military Service: Blacksmith in Continental Army, Revolutionary War, served Battle of Trenton and other engagements 12/25/76-1/3/77 18 2 4 12 19
  • Religion: Lutheran 2
  • Event: Misc. Simon was the 4th great-grandfather of Sharalyn, Hunt, Brent, and Greg Sweitzer 20
  • Reference Number: 1003
  • Note:
    Many of the men who settled the area had also served in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War, coming from Pennsylvania and Maryland into what then was the "far west." One of them lies beneath his monument, which reads: "Simon Essig, 1754-1852, and his wife, Julia Schneer Essig, 1761-1844, emigrated from Cumberland County, Pa., to Plain Township, Stark County, Ohio in 1808. Revolutionary Soldier, Pioneer, and Honored Ancestor..."
    -The Stark County Bicentennial Story: 1776-1976, Vol. 2, Pub. 1976 by Stark Co. Bicentennial Committee, pg. 11.

    The tide of Pennsylvania immigration to Ohio became quite a story in 1806. Families such as Dickenhoof, Bossler, Shinsberger, Hantz, Waver, Essig, Ebys, Rufner, Miller, Palmer, Werstler, and others headed Buckeye way.
    -P. 1, The Stark County Bicentennial Story: 1776-1976, Vol. 2, Pub. 1976 by Stark Co. Bicentennial Committee

    According to The North Canton Heritage, Vol 1, 1805-1940, by Ruth Harpold Basner, page 86, Simon and Julia, along with their children John, Adam, Jacob, George, Samuel, William, Magdalena, Elizabeth, Julia, Sarah, Catharine, and Rebecca, arrived in Plain Township, Stark County, in 1808. There were no settlers in that township prior to 1805, and only about 100 people there upon Simon's and Julia's arrival.

    SIMON ESSIG
    Simon Essig was the son of Wendel Essig who came to America as early as 1750. Simon was born near Hagerstown, Md. He and some of the other children escaped being killed by being sent on an errand to some distant relative when his father, mother and most of their children were massacred by Indians, and their bodies burnt in their own cabin.
    Simon learned the blacksmith trade and during the Revolution he served as blacksmith in the American Army, being present at the battle of Trenton and several other engagements.
    After the close of the Revolution, he married Julia M. Schwarrin (Schneer). In 1808 they emigrated to Ohio, arriving on their land, which was afterwards known as "the old Essig home" just north of the present Nimmisilla Park in Plain Township on the 10th day of May 1808. Here he followed farming and blacksmithing until old age began to creep in upon him and compelled him to retire from his business.
    He was very decided in his views, either political, financial or religious. In religion he was an enthusiastic Lutheran and endeavored to rear all his children in that faith, and in politics he called himself a "Jackson Democrat"
    He was the father of thirteen children-Magdalena, Polly, Elizabeth, John, Adam, George, Julia, Sarah, Samuel, Catherine, William, Rebecca and Jacob.
    From these children has sprung the numerous members of the Essig family so well known throughout Stark County, Ohio.
    His remains repose in Warstler Cemetery
    He died March 18, 1851, aged 97 years, 2 Mo, 21 da."
    -The North Canton Heritage, Vol 1, 1805-1940, by Ruth Harpold Basner, pp. 221-222.

    SIMON ESSIG
    "Simon ESSIG was born on Dec. 27, 1754. He died on Mar 18 1852. Served in the Military during the American Revolution as a Blacksmith. Simon was the fourth child of Wendell and Anna Eve Essig. When Simon was about eighteen, the Indians came and massacred most of the settlement, including all of Wendell Essig's family. Fate had it though, that Simon was on an errand at some distant settlement: he was the only remaining Essig. Simon started his life in the blacksmith trade. During the American Revolution, he entered the Army as a blacksmith. He also served as a volunteer soldier at the Battle of Princeton. In March, 1781, Simon married Julia Margaret Schnarin, and moved to York, Pennsylvania, where four of their thirteen children were born. In 1808, the family travelled for fifteen days by covered wagon over the Allegheny Mountains, to the Ohio country. They were the fourth family to settle in Plain Township."
    -Jeanette J. Wenner (1998), 631 Treadway Blvd., Sheffield Lake, OH 44054; "These narratives were passed down to my husband (George Gilbert Wenner) via his mother (Eloise Essig) who has since passed away."

    [John Trump] married Sarah Essig, who was born in Cumberland County, Pa., in 1799, and was a daughter of Simon and Julia Ann Essig. Accompanied by his family, her father [Simon Essig] came to this county in 1806, casting in his lot with its early settlers. He was a blacksmith and in connection with that trade carried on farming.
    -Portrait & Biographical Record of Stark County, Ohio, Chapman Bros., Chicago, c. 1892, page 7.

    IN COUNCIL of SAFETY [flyers posted in Philadelphia]
    Philadelphia, December 8, 1776
    Sir,
    There is certain intelligence of General Howe's army being yesterday on its march from Brunswick to Princetown, which puts it beyond a doubt that he intends for this city. This glorious opportunity of fignalizing himself in defence of our country, and securing the Rights of America forever, will be seized by every man who has a spark of patriotic fire in his bosom. We entreat you to march the Militia under your command with all proffible expedition to this city, and bring with you as many waggons as you can possibly expedition to this city, which you are hereby authorized to impress, if they cannot be had otherwise--Delay not a moment, it may be fatal and subject you and all you hold most dear to the ruffian hands of the enemy, whose cruelties are without distinction and unequalled.
    By Order of the Council, David Rittenhouse, Vice-President to the Colonels or Commanding Officers of the respective Battalions of this State.
    Two O'Clock, P.M. The Enemy are at Trenton, and all the City Militia are marched to meet them.
    [Simon Essig lived in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, about 125 miles west of Philadelphia. Trenton is 35 miles north east of Philadelphia.]

    POEM FRAGMENT (author unknown)
    . . . who fell
    In Trenton's morning fight
    Who crossed the freezing Delaware
    That cold December night;
    When, as the columns onward marched
    With firm, unbroken ranks,
    The blood-marked footprints thick were left
    Upon the wintry banks.
    -History of Summit County, Ohio

    BATTLES OF TRENTON AND PRINCETON
    December 25, 1776 - January 3, 1777
    The approach of the British to Philadelphia was cause for alarm in the capital. On December 12, 1776, with General Howe's troops just thirty five miles away, Congress delegated dictatorial powers to General George Washington, adjourned and fled to Baltimore until the danger passed.
    The ensuing Battles of Trenton and Princeton were notable as the first Continental Army successes of the Revolutionary War, fought and won under the command of general George Washington, commander in chief of the Continental Army. After the British capture of Fort Washington on Manhattan Island in November 1776, general Sir William Howe had forced the Americans to retreat through New Jersey and across the Delaware River into Pennsylvania. Convinced that the Americans were thoroughly beaten and that the Continental Congress would sue for peace, Howe then went into winter quarters, leaving the Hessian colonel Johann Rall at Trenton with about 1,400 men.
    Howe had not underestimated the weakness of the American army. It consisted of fewer than 3,000 men, badly clothed and equipped and poorly fed. In spite of strenuous efforts by Washington and others to recruit new troops, few citizens cared to join an army that appeared on the point of collapse. Total defeat and the end of the new nation seemed to be at hand, but by a master stroke of strategy, Washington kept the cause alive. On Christmas night, in a blinding hail and snowstorm, Washington led the remnants of his army across the ice-choked Delaware River in Durham boats and surprised the Hessian garrison at Trenton, taking nearly a thousand prisoners.
    Hearing of Washington's move, Lord Cornwallis confronted the Continentals east of the city with about 7,000 troops on Jan. 2, 1777, driving them back. Unable to find boats for an escape, Washington called a council of war that confirmed his bold plan to break camp quietly that night and take a byroad to Princeton. The maneuver succeeded, and three British regiments that met him there on January 3 were routed at the Battle of Princeton. As a result, Washington continued his march to Morristown, N.J., where he took up a strong position on high ground. Cornwallis retired to New Brunswick and the British retreated to New York, leaving the revitalized American army in full control of New Jersey. Besides succeeding in breaking through Howe's lines, Washington had placed himself in an advantageous position for recruiting his army and maintaining a strong defense in the next campaign.
    The effect of these first American victories was marked. Following close on a long series of American reverses and defeats, Washington had fashioned a victory at the moment when the cause seemed irretrievably lost. The battles of Trenton and Princeton put new life into the American cause and renewed confidence in Washington as commander of the Continental Army.
    -Compiled from 1996 Encyclopedia Britannica, 1997 Microsoft Encarta Encyclopedia, and George Washington, by Richard M. Ketchum.

    STARK COUNTY HOME - STARK COUNTY 1805-1836
    The majority of American families did not live in very close proximity to one another, and each farmstead had to be almost entirely self-sufficient. The ideal place to set up and build a home was near a fresh water source. Otherwise, the family would have to dig a well.
    Most early Ohio settlers live in small, bare, poorly lit houses. On the frontier, the dwellings were usually constructed of logs with only one or two rooms and often with no more than two windows. Such houses did not physical partitions, but spaces outside for sleeping, eating, working, and socializing. Floors, windows, and walls were unadorned for the most part. The family may have had a looking glass mirror on the wall, but paintings, prints, or engravings were rare.
    Food was heavy and coarse. Families in northern Ohio ate butter, cheese, salt and beef pork. They made their bread from wheat flour or rye mixed with indian corn. The food supply was limited by the techniques of preservation available. Few families had regular supplies of fresh meat, but usually consumed salted meat or went without. Root crops, such as potatoes, onions, and beets could be stored in underground cellars and eaten throughout the winter.
    The work of women was essential for the household to function and cooking was a major part of the daily routine. When cooking over the hearth they used heavy iron pots and kettles that sat on the coals or hung on a crane that swung over the fire. The blazing fire itself was hazardous and women's skirts had to be carefully protected from the flames. Women were also responsible for making dairy products, grinding sugar, spices, and coffee, hauling water, and slaughtering chickens.
    -Mckinley National Monument / Stark Co. Historical Society display




    Father: Wendel Essig b: 1700 in Canton of Berne, Switzerland
    Mother: Anna Eve Matte b: AFT 1700 in Haegerstown, Washington, Maryland

    Marriage 1 Julia Margaret Schwarrin b: 15 APR 1761 in York County, Pennsylvania
    • Married: MAR 1781 in Washington County, Maryland 8 6 21
    Children
    1. Has No Children Magdalena Essig b: 15 NOV 1782 in York County, Pennsylvania
    2. Has No Children Elizabeth Essig b: 14 SEP 1784 in York County, Pennsylvania
    3. Has Children John Essig b: 23 SEP 1786 in York County, Pennsylvania
    4. Has Children Adam Essig b: 22 NOV 1788 in York County, Pennsylvania
    5. Has No Children Jacob M. Essig b: 8 APR 1791 in Adams County, Pennsylvania
    6. Has No Children George Essig b: 19 OCT 1794 in Adamas County, Pennsylvania
    7. Has No Children Sarah Essig b: 1797
    8. Has No Children Julia A. Essig b: 22 OCT 1797 in Adams County, Pennsylvania
    9. Has Children Sally Essig b: 22 OCT 1797 in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania
    10. Has No Children David Essig b: 1798 in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania
    11. Has No Children Samuel Essig b: 9 FEB 1801 in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania
    12. Has No Children Catherine Essig b: 9 APR 1804 in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania
    13. Has Children William H. Essig b: 9 APR 1804 in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania
    14. Has Children Rebecca Essig b: 7 MAY 1806 in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania

    Sources:
    1. Title: Warstler Cemetery, Middlebranch Road, Plain Township, Stark County, Ohio
      Repository:
      Media: Tombstone
    2. Title: Barbara A. Dunn, Stark County, Ohio, bardulow@juno.com, bardulow@aol.com
      Repository:
      Media: Book
    3. Title: Stark County, Ohio, Ancestor Charts, pub. 1987
      Page: 266
    4. Title: Margaret Anne Schmidt; Margo2323@aol.com; 400 E. Randolph #2323, Chicago, IL 60601
      Repository:
      Media: Book
    5. Title: The North Canton Heritage, Vol 1, 1805-1940, by Ruth Harpold Basner
      Repository:
      Media: Book
      Page: 86, 221-222
    6. Title: ESSIG.GED, Leo Lutz, 1116 Williamsburg Place, Lawrence, KS 66049; LeoLtz@aol.com; March, 2000 email to Gregory Sweitzer
      Repository:
      Media: Book
    7. Title: Combination Atlas Map of Stark County, Ohio, L.H. Everts & Co., Philadelphia, 1875, 3rd edition published 1995 by Stark County Historical Society
      Repository:
      Media: Book
      Page: 26
    8. Title: Jeanette J. Wenner, 631 Treadway Blvd., Sheffield Lake, OH 44054, wennerj@rei.relteccorp.com; 102557.733@compuserve.com
      Repository:
      Media: Book
    9. Title: The North Canton Heritage, Vol 1, 1805-1940, by Ruth Harpold Basner
      Repository:
      Media: Book
      Page: 221
    10. Title: Joanne / Richard Pettit, dknjo@bright.net
    11. Title: The North Canton Heritage, Vol 1, 1805-1940, by Ruth Harpold Basner
      Repository:
      Media: Book
    12. Title: The North Canton Heritage, Vol 1, 1805-1940, by Ruth Harpold Basner
      Repository:
      Media: Book
      Page: 212
    13. Title: The North Canton Heritage, Vol 1, 1805-1940, by Ruth Harpold Basner
      Repository:
      Media: Book
      Page: 222
    14. Title: Mary Ann Sloat - sheet prepared by Oliver Sweitzer III
    15. Title: Compilation of Genealogy Begun March 1, 1944, by OHS III
      Repository:
      Media: Book
      Page: 4
    16. Title: The North Canton Heritage, Vol 1, 1805-1940, by Ruth Harpold Basner
      Repository:
      Media: Book
      Page: 86
    17. Title: The Stark County Bicentennial Story: 1776-1976, Vol. 2, Pub. 1976 by Stark Co. Bicentennial Committee
      Repository:
      Media: Book
      Page: 11
      Text: gives 1808
    18. Title: Warstler Cemetery, Middlebranch Road, Plain Township, Stark County, Ohio
      Repository:
      Media: Tombstone
      Text: Simon's tomstone reads "Revolutionary Soldier ~ Pioneer and Honored Ancestor"
    19. Title: The Stark County Bicentennial Story: 1776-1976, Vol. 2, Pub. 1976 by Stark Co. Bicentennial Committee
      Repository:
      Media: Book
      Page: 11
    20. Title: Gregory Alan Sweitzer
    21. Title: Kathi Valle, ksvalle92@cs.com, 1664634.ged/ftm, submitted Nov. 1, 2001 to ancestry.com

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