YADKIN COUNTY and CASWELL COUNTY

Entries: 145140    Updated: 2014-12-19 04:37:19 UTC (Fri)    Contact: grant

PINNIX, SHORE, DICKERSON, PARDUE, MARTIN, OLVEY, SWAIM of Yadkin Co. and SHAW, SIMPSON, MILES, MATKINS, BOULDIN, LEATH, HORNBUCKLE, GUNN, HOOPER, SNIPES, KIMBROUGH, GRAVES, STADLER, ARNOLD, BLALOCK, PRENDERGAST, WILDER, VINCENT, WALKER, ASHFORD, BIRD, WHITTED, CLENEAY of Caswell/Alamance/Orange Co. -- also WALL, WHITSETT, MOORE, HENRY of Rockingham Co.

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  • ID: I092338
  • Name: Garland "Gallant" Ayres
  • Sex: M
  • Birth: ABT 1775 in VA
  • Burial: **** See AYRES HUDSPETH
  • Note:
    5/29/97 - I an requesting information on a Gallant/Garlint/Garland Ayres/Ayers who was born around 1775 in VA. This is my G-G-Great grandfather. Any information greatly appreciated....

    Thanks, Don Ayers, 435 Seay Rd., Inman, S.C. 29349

    E-MAIL: DAyers6179@aol.com
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    ID: I1835
    Name: Gallant Ayers
    Sex: M
    Birth: ABT. 1776 in VA
    Death: in Yancey County, NC
    Note: It is believed that Gallant (Galient/Garland) Ayers was born in Pittsylvania County Virginia around 1776. I believe that his real name was Garland. There were three Ayers heads of household recorded in Pittsylvania County at the time of his birth. Moses Ayers who had 13 members in his house, Thomas Ayers who was brother to Moses and a Daniel Ayers on which I have been unable to find further information. Thomas moved to Surry County in NC and Moses followed sometime later. Moses then moved on into Georgia and indications are that Thomas went with him. The number of family members and the relocations from Virginia into North Carolina and on to Georgia causes me to believe that Moses was Gallant's father. The fact that Gallant named his first born son Moses also supports this theory.

    Marriage 1 ?
    Children
    Moses Ayers b: 28 FEB 1801 in Georgia
    William Ayers b: ABT. 1805
    Lucinda Ayers
    Efsobe Ayers b: 8 JAN 1808
    Morning Ayers b: 10 JUN 1814

    Marriage 2 Amy or Anna Bennett
    Children
    Jeremiah Ayers b: 6 MAY 1822
    Sarah Ayers b: ABT. JAN 1826
    Baker Ayers b: 15 NOV 1828
    Meshach F. Ayers b: 2 APR 1830
    Wilburn Ayers b: 11 MAY 1834


    RESEARCHING THE ANCESTORS AND DESCENDANTS OF GALLANT AYERS. OTHER SPELLING OF NAME WOULD BE GARLINT AYRES. GALLANT AYERS REPORTEDLY WAS BORN IN VA. AROUND 1775 AND MIGHT HAVE MIGRATED TO SURRY CO. N.C. AREA AND BY 1800 MIGRATED TO FRANKLIN CO. GA. UNTIL AT LEAST 1818 AND TRAVELED BACK TO WILKES COUNTY, N.C. AREA FOR A SHORT TIME BEFORE MOVING ONTO YANCEY CO. N.C. WHERE HE RESIDED AT A PLACE CALLED *******JACK'S CREEK OUTSIDE OF BURNSVILLE N.C. UNTIL HIS DEATH. GALLANT HAD A TOTAL OF 11 CHILDREN. SOME OF THE CHILDREN BY HIS FIRST WIFE WERE MARRIED IN WILKES CO, N.C. BUT LATER MOVED CLOSE TO GALLANT IN YANCEY CO, N.C. EXCEPT ONE SON WHICH WAS WILLIAM WHO MARRIED MARTHA PATSY HUBBARD AND RAISED HIS FAMILY IN WILKES CO, N.C. NAMES IN BIRTH ORDER ARE MOSES, LUCINDA, WILLIAM, EFOSBE, REV. JAMES W. AND MOURING, WHICH WAS CHILDREN OF FIRST WIFE WHO WE DON'T KNOW HER NAME. CHILDREN FROM SECOND WIFE ANNA BENNETT, POSSIBLY SPELLED AMY BENNETT, ARE AS FOLLOWS, JEREMIAH, BAKER SR., SARAH, MISHACK F. AND WILBURN. BIRTH RANGES FROM 1801 THRU 1834 ON CHILDREN. WE ARE SEARCHING FOR THE PARENTS OF GALLANT ALONG WITH ANY INFORMATION REFERENCE TO THE FAMILY HERITAGE. ALSO RESEARCHING THE FOLLOWING RELATED FAMILIES FROM WESTERN NORTH CAROLINA: BAILEY, BANKS, BENNETT, BOWMAN, BRIGGS, DEYTON, EDWARDS, FOX, GOUGE, HENSLEY, HIGGINS, HOBSON, HONEYCUTT, HUGHES, JOHNSON, KING, LAWS, LETTERMAN, MCCURRY, MILLER, MITCHELL, PATE, PATTERSON, PEAKE, PHILLIPS, PRESNELL, RANDOLPH, RAY, RIDDLE, ROBERSON, TAFFER, TIPTON, WEBB, AND WOODY......WHEN YOU VIEW MY DESCENDANT CHART AND SEE THAT I HAVE MADE A MISTAKE OR HAVE ANY QUESTIONS OR INFORMATION ON ANYONE IN THIS REPORT PLEASE CALL OR WRITE ME AND I WILL CORRECT OR ADD THE INFORMATION THAT YOU ARE WILLING TO SHARE. I HAVE A LOT OF INFORMATION THAT I HAVEN'T POSTED AND I AM ADDING ALL THE TIME. ALL YOUR HELP WILL BE GREATLY APPRECIATED AND THE SOLE REASON FOR THE GENEALOGY REPORT IS TO SHARE OUR FAMILY HISTORY WITH THE AYERS RELATIVES AND TO HELP THEM DISCOVER THEIR ANCESTORS...
    ________________

    Subj: Garland Ayers
    Date: 1/3/2009 2:25:34 AM Eastern Standard Time
    From: lmvollmer@bresnan.net
    To: grantpinnix@cs.com
    File: Moses&NathanielAyers.zip (141987 bytes) DL Time (TCP/IP): < 1 minute
    Received from Internet: click here for more information


    I, too, am searching for Garland Ayers' roots. I have a Garland Ayers in Bedford Co, TN in the 1850 census with a number of children. Next door is Jesse and Allis Boon. I believe Allis Boon to be his oldest daughter as her son is named Garland Boon and in later censuses, her younger sister, Virginia Caroline Ayers resides with one of her daughters in Van Buren Co. KY. I thought that Garland's father was Moses Ayers, Jr, but I have no evidence.

    I'm attaching some Ayers information I came across in the event it's helpful to you. I would love to share information with you. What I think my lineage is: Lynn Farris, Andrew Farris, Addie Mooneyhame, Alice Caldonia Boone, Allis (Alice) Ayers, Garland Ayers, Moses Ayers, Moses Ayers, Natanial Ayers.

    I was recently in TN and KY and found marriage certificates of the daughters of Allis Ayers Boone Cross. I photocopied them and would be happy to share copies.

    I hope we're on the same trail,
    Lynn Farris


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    MEMOIRS OF VALENTINE DAVIS
    Part 2

    I Remember The First Time I Ever Went To Town. I And Brother Young And A Man By The Name Of Evans Went To Shelbyville And Drove Them Oxen. It Was In The Year Of 1860. I Remember That We Carried Some Wheat And Corn And Went By The Mill, Known As The Doke (Doak) Mill. It Was Across The River From Where The Sylvan Mills Now Stand And The Sylvan Mills Was There At The Time. We Left Our Grinding There Then Went On To Town And They Sold Out Their Butter And We Went Out On Unionville Turnpike As Far As What They Call The Public Well. At That Time There Was A Bucket Factory There Where They Made All Sorts Of Cedar-Ware Buckets And Tubs, Cedar Churns, And They Were Making Walnut Stocks There. That Being My First Trip To Town, I Saw Lots Of Things That Were Of Great Concern To Me. For Where I Lived, While It Was A Mighty Pretty Place, It Was A Little Off The Pike And Nothing Much To See. There Was No Stream Nearer Than Four Or Five Miles Of Us That Required Any Bridge And When I Would Hear Them Talking About Bridges, I Could Not Imagine How They Would Build A Bridge. I Remember That Brother William Went Somewhere One Day And His Horse Fell Through A Bridge And Hurt Brother Pretty Bad And That Raised My Curiosity About What Sort Of Contraption A Bridge Was. I Got It Fixed In My Mind That They Was Something Like A House Top And As High As The Highest Tree. A Toll Gate Was A Real Wonder To Me. I Thought It Was A Big Gate Put Across The Road But I Could Not Imagine How They Could Keep People From Going Around That Gate, So I Learned A Great Deal That Day That I Went To Town. It Cleared Up Many Mysteries To Me. When I Think Of How I Was Raised And Look At How Children Are Raised This Day And Time, I Can See A Wide Difference. Just Think Of It. I Was 9 Years Old Before Ever I Was As Far From Home As Seven Miles, And That Trip To Town That Day Is As Fresh On My Mind Almost As If It Had Been Yesterday.

    There Was Nothing That Escaped My View. Every Thing Was New And I Saw Everyone. Both Sides Of The Road Both Going And Coming. When We Started Out That Morning On The Ox Cart, Brother Young Was Driving And Him And Mr. Evans Sat In Front And I Was Setting Back On The Sacks Of Grain As We Drove Out To The Pike. Now If I Were Starting Out On A Trip To New York, I Know That I Could Not Feel Half As Delighted As I Was Then. The First Mile Was Nothing New To Me For That Part Of The Road I Had Already Traveled Going To School. But The Next Mile Brought Me New Scenery. It Took Us Through A Toll Gate But Just Before We Got To The Toll Gate, I Saw A Pole Reaching Clear Across The Pike And I Began To Wonder What It Was For. But About That Time My Brother Turned To Me And Said, "This Is The Toll Gate", But It Was So Far From Looking Like I Had Always Imagined A Toll Gate Was, I Felt Like A Fool. I Saw At Once Though, How They Kept People From Going Around Them. The Toll-Gates Was Not Fixed To Them Like They Have Them Now. The Gate Keeper Had To Take Hold Of The Pole And Carry It Clear Around The Pike Every Time He Opened It. They Kept Them Open Most Of The Time But Would Close Them Up At Dark And Open Them At Nine O'clock At Night. All The Travel After Nine O'clock Until Daybreak Got Through Free. And After Passing Through The Toll-Gate And My Curiosities Satisfied About It, We Journeyed On Our Ox-Cart And I Was Taking Everything In For You May Bet Your Life That In Traveling On An Ox-Cart That You Had Plenty Of Time To Take In The Scenery And That I Did.

    There Was Plenty Of New Things For Me To Look At And The Forth Mile From Home, We Came To A Long Bridge, This Bridge Was Built Across Sugar Creek And Was Not Very High But Mighty Long. Though We Did Not Cross, We Forded The Creek In Order To Give The Oxen Water. After Crossing That Creek, We Then Came To Thompson's Shop. We Were Then Just Four Miles From Home. Our Next Mile Brought Us In Some New Scenery. We Past What Is Known As The Bill Little Place. It Was A Large Two Story Building Painted Pure White, Trimmed In Green, And Set Back 300 Yards From The Pike And A Rise Surrounded With Pine And Other Kind Of Trees With Lots Of Shrubbery And Vines. The Space Between The Pike And House Was Set In Blue Grass And Had A Winding Gravel Driveway Bordered On Each Side With Cedar Trees That Had Been Kept Trimmed Down Nicely. In This Lot There Was A Flock Of Wild Geese; Must Have Been As Many As 50 Of Them. Running Down Through This Grass Lot Was A Bold Brook And There Was An Artificial Lake In This Lot And Them Geese Was Having A Time. They Was Of The Wild Goose Kind But Had Been Trained. And Right On The Other Side Of The Pike Was A Nice Brick House; The First Brick House That I Had Ever Seen. I Tell You I Had Many Imaginations About How It Was That Some People Could Have Things So Fine Because I Never Had Been Raised To Believe That One Person Had Anymore Than The Other. I Thought That Everybody Lived About Alike.

    So The Mile Put Us To The Mill. We Left The Pike And About A Quarter Of A Mile Down To The Mill And We Came In Sight Of The River And Saw The Water Spilling Over The Dam And I Learned The Roar Of The Mill. I Know That Sight Of Niagara Falls Would Not Amuse Me Half As Much As That Did At That Time. A Few Minutes Later We Went Back To The Pike, That Is, After They Had Taken The Grain Into The Mill And Gave Instructions On How To Grind It, And We Headed For Town. We Were Then Traveling On Our Sixth Mile. We Passed Through Another Toll Gate And Then Crossed Another Bridge Across Flat Creek, Past Another Nice House With A Pretty Lawn In Front. At The Next Mile Which Was The First Mile Post From Town, We Came In Sight Of Town And Let Me Tell You When I Looked Across The Field And Was Seeing The Town In Plain View With All The Tall Buildings, The Court House And Church Steeples, And Heard The Exhaust Of An Old Steam-Mill, I Was Frightened Plum Away.

    We Were Then Traveling Our Seventh Mile And Our Old Oxen Jogged Along In The Usual Gate; About Three Miles An Hour But After While We Came To And Crossed The Town Bridge And Was In Town And I Know That If I Was In New York Today, I Would Not See Half As Much As I Saw That Day. So I Followed My Brothers And Evans Around And I Had Two Silver Nickels. I Spent One Of Them For A Little Barlo Knife. The Merchant Said That The Knife Was Worth Ten Cents But He Would Let Me Have It For Five Cents. So I Brought My Other Five Cents Home. I Kept It Until 1866 And I Gave It To Brother Young For A $20.00 Confederate Bill, After We Got Through With Our Trading We Started For Home. We Got Home About Sun Down And I Had Lots To Tell About What Wonderful Sights I Had Seen. That Ended My First Trip To Town.

    The Next Year In 1861, The War Was On In Good Fashion. The Country Was Full Of Solders In The Winter Of 1862. There Were Lots Of Federal Solders In The Country. There Was Never A Day But That Solders Came To Our House To Get Something To Eat. They Belonged To Barge's Army And Were Always Polite And Paid For Everything That They Got. I Remember Two Came To Our House One Day And Wanted To Buy Some Turnips. We Happened To Have A Pretty Good Patch Of Turnips And Mother Sent Me With Them To Get Them. They Got A Bushel And Gave Me Five Dollars For Them. I Carried The Money To Mother And Ask Her To Let Me Keep It But She Would Not Let Me, So I Thought That Turnips Were A Pretty Profitable Crop At $5.00 Per Bushel. Soon I Got Me A Hoe And Dug Up Some Ground And Planted Me A Few Turnip Seed With The Expectation Of Selling Them For $5.00 A Bushel But My Crop Was Too Late. They Did Not Do Any Good. That Was The Fall Of 1862. So In The Spring Of 1863 Myself And Brother Young Put In Another Crop Of Corn And Hay And Oats And That Summer There Was A Good Crop Year. There Was Not Much Planted But What There Was Yielded Well. There Was A Great Many Berries Also. I Could Have Stayed In One Place And Picked A Quart. The Squirrels Became Very Plentiful. I Remember In The Winter Of 1863, I Guess I Caught A Hundred Or More. I Caught Them By Trapping And There Was One Boy In The Neighborhood That Was Trapping But Was Not Having Any Luck. So One Day I Went To Me Trap And There Sat His Trap Right Beside Mine And I Turned His Trap Bottom Side Up And The Next Time I Went To My Trap His Was Gone And Mine Was Torn To Pieces. But The First Trap That I Ever Had I Remember That Brother William Made It For Me And I Took It Out In The Field And Sat And Baited It And I Would Look At It Three Or Four Times A Day But Would Always Find It Setting, After A Few Days, I Got Tired Of Going So Often And Not Getting Anything But One Day I Went To My Trap And It Was Down. I Got Down On My Knees And Felt Under It And I Saw Something That Looked Like A Partridge But It Seemed To Be Dead Or Something Wrong. It Was Not Moving About Any But I Kept My Hand Under The Trap And Sure Enough It Was Dead But That Made Little Difference; I Had Caught One. I Pulled It Out And Did Not Wait To Reset, Then I Lit Out For Home, I Ran All The Way And When I Got There I Went In With And Yelped Out, "Oh, I Caught One. I Got A Partridge!" But Sister Sallie Says, "That Ain't A Partridge, That Is A Chicken". But I Would Not Hear To This. I Knew It Was A Partridge. She Could Not Fool Me I Knew A Partridge When I Saw One.

    Something appears to be missing from the copy that is available today. And In The Fight One Boy Got Out With A Knife On The Back Of The Hand And They All Said That I Had Done It But If I Cut Anybody I Never Did Know It Though I Had A Little Old Knife And Had It Out And We Were All In A Mixed Up Fight But We Were Some Distance From The Church And Running From A Bunch Of Boys. There Never Was Nothing Done About It But My Brother-In-Law, Bamma's Husband, Gave Me A Good Scaring. He Told Me That They Were Going To Have Me Arrested For Fighting At Church And He Said If He Were In My Place That He Would Slip In But That Did Not Discourage Me Any. That Had A Good Affect On Me Because I Was More Careful How I Cut Up In The Church. This Was In The Fall Of 1864. In February Of 1865, Brother Ting Came Home From The War. He Was About 22 Or 23 Years Old And After He Had Been Home He Took Me And Went To Work On The Farm. He Buckled Up The Oxen And Began To Turn The Land. That Was The First Plowing That We Ever Done With The Oxen. He Did The Plowing And I Did The Planting And With His Horse And The Old Horse That I Spoke Of Before, He And Myself Made A Pretty Good Crop Of Corn. Brother Young Hired Out That Year To Ben Ransom. Father Did Not Come Home Until March 1866. In January 1866 Brother Ting Married And On February 18, 1866 Mother Died. Sometime Between This Time Brother Swip Came Home On A Visit And Mother Had A Hard Spell Of Colic While He Was At Home. He Started Back To Dresden, In Weakly County About The 10 Th. Of February And Brother Young Went With Him. Father Was At Home While Swip Was Visiting And I Remember Very Well The Morning That Swip Started Back Home That Pa Started To Mississippi On Some Kind Of Business. Just Two Days From The Time That They All Left, Mother Took Another Bad Spell Of Colic, Or That Is What We Called It At The Time, And Lived Just A Week And Died. I Don't Think That I Ever Saw But One Person Suffer More Than She Did And That Was Sister Jinnie. She Did Very Much Like Mother But She Was Sick Eight Weeks. I Never Saw Two People Affected Anymore Alike Than Jennie And Her Mother. But After Jinnie Had Suffered Terribly About Five Days, Dr. Sam McGrew Began Giving Her Morphine And I Am Sadly Afraid That He Kept Her Living For Seven Long Weeks And If They Ever Gave Mother Any Morphine I Never Knew It. I Believe That If They Had That She Would Have Lived Longer And Would Have Gotten Over That Spell. I Saw Sister Jinnie On The Fifth Day Of Her Sickness And I Did Not Think She Could Possibly Live More Than Three Or Four Hours But The Doctor Gave Her A Shot And In Fifteen Minutes She Was Sound Asleep And You Could Not Tell That There Was Anything The Matter With Her By Looking At Her. Before He Gave It She Was Rolling And Tumbling And The Muscles Of Her Face And Eyes Were Drawn So From The Misery That She Was Suffering, That She Did Not Look Like Herself And Mother Was Sick She Was In A Rack Of Misery All The Time. I Don't Think That She Got Any Rest At All Night Or Day From The Time She Was Sick Until She Died. I Believe That Mother Had What They Now Call Appendicitis And If She Had Been Operated On She Would Have Gotten Well. After Mother Had Been Dead For About Two Weeks, Pa Came Home. He Never Had Heard That She Was Dead Until He Got Home. We Did Not Know Where He Was And Had No Way At That Time Of Finding Him And We Had No Way Of Communicating With Him. We Did Not Know What Part Of Mississippi He Went To. Brother Ting Met Him At The Gate When He Came Home And Had The Painful Duty Of Breaking The Sad News To Pa. Pa Was Hurt And I Never Saw Him In Grief Before In My Life. He Just Could Not Become Reconciled. He Cried And Took On All Night; Never Went To Bed At All That Night And Sometime In The Night He Professed Religion And Called For All His Children. Pa, Up Until That Time I Am Sorry To Say Was A Very Wicked Man Or At Least I Thought So. Mother's Death Brought A Change In Him And He Lived Somewhat Of A Different Life After She Died. After She Died She Was Buried At The Old Home Grave Yard. It Was Her Request That She Be Buried There. Father Was Also Buried There. The Grave Was Just About Fifty Yards From The House. The Grave Yard Was There Before Pa Bought The Place But Mother Was The First White Person To Be Buried There After We Went There. There Was A Man And His Wife Buried There By The Name Of Williams When I Could First Recollect Those Graves Were Fresh. They At One Time Lived Around The Place And Died There. After Mother Was Buried There, In A Few Years Say 15 Or 20, The Grave Yard Filled Up Mighty Fast. It Is Now Like All Other Family Grave Yards; Neglected Until You Would Hardly Know It Is A Grave Yard.

    We Raised A Crop Of Corn Pa, Brother Ting, Myself, And A Hired Hand Planted About Three Acres Of Cotton And Twenty Acres Of Corn And Hay Enough To Do Us. We Had The Cotton Bailed And Did Not Sell It Until The Spring Of 1867. Brother Ting And Myself Carried It To Shelbyville On The Ox Wagon And Sold It For 22 Cents Per Pound In The Lint And The Two Bales Brought Something Over $200.00 And I Got A New ???. The Next Year Ting Made A Crop To Himself With Pa To Boss Him And I Made A Good Crop About 15 Acres And I Planted And Tended It Well For A Boy. After I Got My Crop Laid By I Started To School, Went About 6 Weeks, And Then Had To Stop And Pull Fodder. I Went To School To Arnold Delphs A Jurman. The School Was Taught At Bethel Church, The Place Where I Went To Sleep. After School Was Out I Went To Work Pulling Fodder And Other Work I Had To Do.

    In 1868 I Made Another Crop By Myself With What Little Pa Did. In August Brother Young Came Back From West Tennessee And In 1869 Him And Me Made A Crop At Home. By This Time I Was Getting To Be A Pretty Good Sized Boy. I Was 17 Years Old And Began To Go With The Girls And In The Summer Of 1869 After Young And Me Laid Our Crop By, I Started To School. The School Was Taught By Captain Will Muse, A Mighty Fine Man. He Was A Rebel Solder And Was Wounded In The Army. It Was During This School I, For The First Time, Lay Eyes On My First Wife. Her And Some More Children Visited The School One Friday Evening. She Was About Nine Or Ten Years Old But Large For Her Age And I Thought That She Was The Prettiest And Sweetest Girl That I Ever Saw. I Could Not Help Gasping At Her But I Did Not Know Her Name And Couldn't Find Out. I Never Did Find Out Who She Was Until I Met Her Again Six Years Later. By This Time She Was About Grown. But The First Time That I Saw Her Brought A Queer Feeling Over Me That I Have Thought Of Since.

    The Summer Of 1869 I Went To Live With My Sister Bamma. They Lived Up In The College Grove Neighborhood About Two And One Half Miles From Richmond. I Pulled Fodder For A Man, Enough To Buy Me Seven Yards Of Goods, And Sister Bamma Cut And Made Me A Suit Of Clothes Out Of It; The First Suit I Ever Had. It Cost Me About $4.50. I Wore The Suit All That Winter And Wore It To West Tennessee The Next Spring.

    In February 1870, I Went Down To West Tennessee. But On December 20, 1869, I Made A Trip Down Duck River On A Timber Raft. The Raft Started From The Mouth Of North Fork Creek. Me And Bill Lentz And Mike Lentz And Several Others Made That Trip. The Raft Went Clear On To New Orleans But I Came Back Home When I Got To Johnsonville. After We Got Out Of Duck River, They Only Needed Half The Crew, So They Paid Off Half Of The Men And Sent Them Back Home. And This Was My First Trip Away From Home. And I Had Lots To Tell When I Got Back Home. We All Boarded A Train At Johnsonville About 12 O'clock One Day And That Was My First Trip On A Train. And The Train Carrying Us Arrived In Nashville About Dark. We Had To Change Cars For Shelbyville About Two O'clock At Night And Got To Shelbyville About Nine O'clock, There The Crowd Began To Scatter, Most Of Them Went Out The Unionville Pike, Below El Bethel Church. I Went Home With A Young Fellow By The Name Of Fisher.

    RETURN TO PART ONE

    This Data Was Written By My Great Grandfather Valentine Sublett Davis (1852-1918) Of Shelbyville, Tenn.
    I Will Be Happy To Share Additional Data To Those Interested In This Family.
    Mike Hammond - Garland Texas
    mailto:mikham@bigfoot.com




    Father: Unplaced Ayres

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