YADKIN COUNTY and CASWELL COUNTY

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  • ID: I023416
  • Name: Thomas Burton
  • Sex: M
  • Birth: ABT 1634
  • Death: ABT FEB 1685 in Charles City Co., VA
  • Note:
    Thomas Burton (—1686) of “Cobbs” [7120.2]

    Thomas Burton of “Cobbs” was very likely brother of John Burton with whom he settled the 350-acre plantation called “Cobbs.”
    Thomas was established in Henrico County well before the surviving records begin in 1677. When Ambrose Cobbs of York County established “Cobbs” in 1639, Abraham Wood and John Baugh were already settled there. Robert Cobbs assigned the plantation to Michael Masters in 1656 and Masters assigned it to John and Thomas Burton the same year.
    Thomas Burton appeared in the Henrico County tithable list of 1679 made to comply with “An act for the defence of the country against the incursions of the Indian Enemy.” The king could call on one man in Burton’s household for defense.
    Thomas married Susanna and they were the parents of five. Among their sons was Abraham Burton suggesting a connection to Abraham Wood or Abraham Womack. When Thomas Burton gave some livestock to sons John and Abraham Burton in 1681, Thomas Lockett and his wife, Margaret (—) Lockett, witnessed the deeds.
    Thomas was dead by 1 February 1685/6 when the court granted his widow, Susanna, administration of his estate. Recorded that same day was a deed by which Thomas Burton Sr. gave 100 acres to each of four sons: Thomas, John, Abraham, and Isaac. These sons remained south of the James River in Bristol and later, Dale parishes. Their descendants were soon in Prince George and Amelia counties.
    Susanna married second 2 October (license) 1686 John Stewart, called “glover” to distinguish him from John Stewart.
    Children of Thomas and Susanna (—) Burton:
    Thomas Burton [7120.2.1] (c.1664) deposed in April 1680 that he was sixteen. He had been called as a witness against William Hatcher who had been charged with overstepping the law to protect his pond from poachers.
    Perhaps then unknown to Thomas was that Hatcher had already made his will providing for schooling Thomas until he was seventeen and leaving him 226 acres for life.
    Thomas was out of the country by October 1687 when his brother John Burton petitioned the court to receive his brother’s estate. The court ordered John Stewart, their stepfather, to give security for the estate or deliver it up to John.
    Thomas was dead by 1691 when his widow, Elizabeth, then the wife of John Buchanan, addressed a letter to her “Honored Mother [mother-in-law] Mrs. Susanna Burton” from Boston notifying her of the death of her son.
    Apparently without heirs, his 100-acre portion of “Cobbs” passed to John and his 226 acres from William Hatcher descended to his son Edward Hatcher.
    John Burton [7120.2.2] (c.1666-1754) of “Cobbs” was about fifteen in 1681 when his father gave him a yearling calf. John swore in October 1688 that he was twenty-two years of age. By then he possibly was the husband of Elizabeth Fowler, daughter of blacksmith Samuel Fowler who left one shilling to daughter Elizabeth Burton in his 1688-will in Henrico County.
    In 1704 John sold “Cobbs” to John Bolling. The plantation then consisted of 103 acres he inherited from his father, 100 acres he inherited from his brother Thomas, and 100 acres purchased from John Archer. Illiterate, he made his mark on the indenture.
    John bought 340 acres on Falling Creek from John Pleasants 1 March 1708/9. By patent he acquired 341 acres south of the James River on Deep Creek in 1714. Part of this tract he sold to John Pleasants in 1716. In 1720 John got 500 acres on the north side of Swift Creek next to the land of Michael Michael. Burton sold a 300-acre tract of this land to John Wooldridge Jr. in 1734.
    John gave 85 acres on Falling Creek to his son Isaiah Burton in 1729 and 85 acres to son Thomas Burton in 1736. Like most Colonial father’s, he was setting his boys up to carry on as planters.
    John lived to be nearly eighty. To distinguish him from his son and grandson of the same name, the county clerks rudely styled him “Old John Burton.”
    John married as his second wife Elizabeth (Bevin) Elam Paine Shepherd.
    Chesterfield County charged John Burton Sr. on two tithes in 1756.
    John made his will in Dale Parish, Chesterfield County (will dated 23 Feb. 1754 , recorded 4 June 1756 ). His wife was still living will and he identified eleven grown children. John Baker, Robert Cayce, and Sarah Baker witnessed his will.
    Elizabeth Burton made her will in Henrico County (will dated 24 Sept. 1757 , recorded 1 June 1759 ). Both she and he husband mentioned unplaced granddaughter Arabella Burton in their wills. Elizabeth named also daughter Judith (Paine) Burton in her’s.
    Robert Burton [7120.2.2.1] (c.1690-c.1730) was not mentioned in his father’s 1754-will. It is supposed that he married a daughter of Seth Ward and they were the parents of Seth Burton.
    William Burton [7120.2.2.2].
    John Burton [7120.2.2.3] (c.1693-1747) secured a patent to 133 acres on the south side of the James River and the county line 12 February 1742/43. The same day he got 400 acres on the north side of Nisoms Branch. John Burton Jr. paid tax on three levys in 1736.
    In 1746 John Burton Jr. conveyed to his son called “John Burton, the younger,” 100 acres that was part of his 400-acre patent. He gave his son Robert Burton 100 acres of the 130-acre patent the same year.
    John Burton Jr. was one-quarter of the partnership of Henry Hatcher, Henry Hatcher Jr. and Robert Hudson that owned a mill of Beaverpond Branch of Swift Creek. The three bought out the interest of Robert Hudson in 1735.
    John made his will in Dale Parish, Henrico County (will dated 5 Sept. 1746 , recorded Oct. 1747), mentioning his wife, Elizabeth, and several adult children. By 1756 three sons had left the county, leaving only son John residing in Chesterfield County.
    Elizabeth was doubtless a daughter of Caleb Ware who left to “young John Burton, son of John Burton Sr., a Negro man, my wearing clothes, a cow and calf and the plantation I now live on” in his 1740-will.
    Caleb Burton [7120.2.2.3.1] got from his father land on Nisoms Branch. He was living in Augusta County in 1757 when he sold his inheritance to his brother John Burton. From there he served in the county militia.
    Joseph Burton [7120.2.2.3.2], apparently the youngest son, receive the home plantation. He too was living in Augusta County in 1755 when he sold 184 acres that belonged to his father to Christopher Robertson for “1 Negro man.” His wife was then Elizabeth. Robertson sold this tract to John Burton a year later for £30.
    Elizabeth Burton [7120.2.2.3.3].
    Sarah Burton [7120.2.2.3.4].
    Joanna Burton [7120.2.2.3.5].
    Mary Burton [7120.2.2.3.6].
    John Burton [7120.2.2.3.7] (-1799), called “ye younger” to distinguish him from his father John Burton Jr. who lived to 1746 and his grandfather of the same name who lived to 1756. John received a shilling in the will of his father as he had already been given land.
    In 1756 John bought from Christopher Robertson the 184 acres that had belonged to his brother Joseph Burton. He acquired also land that his brother Caleb inherited but disposed of the land he inherited from Caleb Ware.
    In 1767 Henry Baker sold Burton 100 acres next to his own land and the county line. John Burton was head of a household of six whites and eight blacks in Chesterfield County in 1783.
    John Burton died in Chesterfield County (will dated 2 June 1799 , recorded 14 Oct. 1799 ). His wife was alive when he made his will but he did not name her.
    John Burton [7120.2.2.3.7.1], the fourth of his name, settled on his own plantation by 1772 when his father gave him a parcel of land on Nisoms Branch of Swift Creek. He was head of a household of three whites and 4 blacks in Chesterfield County in 1783.
    Nancy Burton [7120.2.2.3.7.2] married Miles Gibson according to her father’s will. Her brother William identified her as Nancy. Miles was a son of Miles Gibson who left “1 Negro” to Nancy Gibson, daughter of Miles Gibson in his 1788-will. Miles’ mother was Hannah who identified his daughters, Hannah and Nancy, in her 1793-will.
    In July 1793 Nancy Gibson, orphan of Miles Gibson, chose William Finney as her guardian, and the court appointed Philip Turpin guardian to Hannah. Miles was not dead. This action was in response to these young women becoming minor heirs to the estate of their grandmother Gibson.
    Elizabeth Gibson [7120.2.2.3.7.2.1] was a legatee of the will of her uncle William Burton.
    Nancy Gibson [7120.2.2.3.7.2.2] (c.1770) was a legatee of the 1788-will of her paternal grandfather. She married Obadiah Flournoy in Chesterfield County 24 March 1798.
    Hannah Gibson [7120.2.2.3.7.2.3] was a legatee of the 1793-will of her grandmother Hannah Gibson. The court appointed Aaron Haskins her guardian 13 October 1794 and she chose William Flournoy 12 September 1796.
    Hannah married Richard Cundiff in Chesterfield County 9 April 1799. Surety was Jacob Flournoy.
    daughter Burton [7120.2.2.3.7.3] married Charles Dubrel.
    John Dubrel [7120.2.2.3.7.3.1] was a legatee of the will of his uncle William Burton.
    Sarah Burton [7120.2.2.3.7.4] married Littleberry Sublett. See their family
    Edith Burton [7120.2.2.3.7.5] married Abraham Sublett. See their family
    Joseph Burton [7120.2.2.3.7.6] was living in Buckingham County when his father made his will.
    Mary Burton [7120.2.2.3.7.7] was Mary Crumpton when her father made his 1799-will and was the mother of several children including Laban Gibson. She apparently married first Thomas Gibson. Chesterfield County charged “Thos. Gipson” on two tithes in 1756.
    Gibson was dead by 1775 when John Burton began to report on his estate. Burton remained guardian to Laban Gibson, orphan of Thomas Gibson, until 1779 when the court appointed John Crumpton, presumably now the boy’s stepfather.
    John Crumpton, “late of Halifax” died drunk 1 April 1786, so swore a coroner’s jury, “good and lawful men of Manchester Parish,” assembled at the coal pits of Robert Wooldridge two days later. Thus by 1799, Mary was twice widowed and the mother of at least one child.
    Laban Gibson [7120.2.2.3.7.7.1] was named in the 1799-will of his maternal grandfather.
    Thomas Burton [7120.2.2.3.7.8] inherited the home plantation.
    daughter Burton [7120.2.2.3.7.9] married a Foesé.
    Phoebe Foesé [7120.2.2.3.7.9.1] was a legatee of the 1799-will of her maternal grandfather.
    William Burton [7120.2.2.3.7.10] left an undated will in Chesterfield County mentioning a wife, Mary (will dated — , recorded 11 Sept. 1791 ). He identified his Gibson sister as Nancy and named a son of his Dubrel sister.
    Robert Burton [7120.2.2.3.8] received a shilling in the will of his father as he had already received land. He was living in South Carolina in January 1752/3 when he sold the 100 acres his father gave him in 1746 to Josiah Hatcher. It was possibly he, with a wife, Ann, who were the parents of Frances Burton whose birth was recorded in the Bristol Parish Register 11 October 1732.
    Agnes Burton [7120.2.2.3.9] married a Farmer. Apparently having received her share of her father’s estate, she received one shilling in his will.
    Isaiah Burton [7120.2.2.4] (c.1698) bought 600 acres in Dale Parish from Henry Cary in 1736. Isaiah Burton and Obedience, his wife, sold the tract to John Fowler in 1751. Nathaniel Burton who witnessed the deed may have been their son. Isaiah paid tax on 2 levys and 85 acres in 1734.
    Isaiah Burton was a resident of Albemarle County when he bought 1,500 acres on the south side of the James River in Chesterfield County from Ware Rockett in 1757. The same year he sold the 85 acres his father had given him in 1729 to Abraham Cowley for £30. Isaiah was in Buckingham County in 1763 when he sold his nephew John burton, son of Thomas, 200 acres.
    One Isaiah Burton Jr. got a patent to 400 acres in Albemarle County near the Slate River 10 Sep 1755. The same day his posited father secured a tract of 1,788 neighboring acres.
    James Burton [7120.2.2.5] (-1783) was given 85 acres on Falling Creek by his father 3 March 1734/5. James Burton paid tax on one levy and 555 acres in 1736. Sheriff John Nash charged him also, “to register one birth.”
    James was married to Judith by May 1761 when they sold the 85 acres his father gave him to John Baker. They were then residents of Lunenburg County in that area that would become Charlotte County. His bride was possibly Judith Paine.
    James was head of a household of three whites in Charlotte County in 1782.
    James made his will in Charlotte County (will dated 13 Mar. 1781 , recorded 2 June 1783). His wife was still alive but he did not name her. He identified three children and left some household goods and livestock to granddaughter Elizabeth without identifying her parents or her surname.
    Thomas Burton [7120.2.2.5.1] was head of a household of seven whites and one black in Charlotte County in 1782. He was likely named for his posited grandfather Thomas Paine.
    Mary Burton [7120.2.2.5.2] married an Ail.
    Agnes Burton [7120.2.2.5.3] married a Hudson, possibly James Hudson whose name appeared in her father’s estate settlement. He was a son of James Hudson whose will James Burton Jr. witnessed.
    Thomas Burton [7120.2.2.6] (c.1702-1773) was given 85 acres on Falling Creek by his father 4 March 1736/7. As Thomas Burton Sr. he sold this tract and another 200 acres in Dale Parish to Ware Rockett in 1745. Joanna relinquished her dower right in the lands. She may have been a Joanna Hancock.
    Thomas Burton paid on two levies in Henrico County in 1736 and two tithables in 1756.
    Thomas provided for two sons via deeds in 1754. He conveyed 594 acres of John Burton and another plantation of 677 acres to Thomas Burton Jr. His wife was likely then dead.
    Thomas made his will in Chesterfield County (will dated 8 Dec. 1771 , recorded 5 Nov. 1773 ).
    Thomas Burton [7120.2.2.6.1] (c.1723) inherited his father’s great Bible and one dollar. Chesterfield County charged Thomas Burton Jr. on three tithables in 1756. He was head of a household of one white and nine blacks in Chesterfield County in 1783.
    Thomas Burton who left all his estate to his grandson George Hancock, son of George Hancock (will dated 28 April 1790 ).
    Sarah Burton [7120.2.2.6.1.1] married George Hancock by 1763 when her father gave 200 acres on Beaverpond Branch in Chesterfield County to “my son-in-law George Hancock... and Sarah Hancock, his wife, my daughter.”
    John Burton [7120.2.2.6.2] (-1801) paid on three tithes in Chesterfield County in 1756. He was head of a household of four whites and 12 blacks in Chesterfield County in 1783.
    John left a will in Chesterfield County (will dated 10 Jan. 1801 , recorded 12 Feb. 1801 ) identifying several children and grandchildren.
    Martha Burton [7120.2.2.6.2.1] was a legatee of the 1771-will of her grandfather Burton. She married a Pankey.
    Samuel Hardin Pankey [7120.2.2.6.2.1.1] was a legatee of the 1788-will of his uncle Hardin Burton, the 1801-will of his maternal grandfather, and of his aunt Sally Burton. He married Mary Burton, daughter of Sarah Burton, in Chesterfield County 11 October 1798.
    Thomas Burton [7120.2.2.6.2.2] was a legatee of the 1771-will of his grandfather Burton. He was head of a household of one white and eight blacks in Chesterfield County in 1783.
    John Burton [7120.2.2.6.2.3] (-c.1796) was given 123 acres on Pokeshock Creek by his father 22 February 1785. John’s widow was Sarah so we presume he was the John Burton who married Sarah Horner in Chesterfield County 6 August (bond) 1775.
    Sarah was a daughter of Benjamin Horner who left her “1 Negro” in his 1766-will. Sarah’s mother, who had the distinctive name of Sabrina (—) Horner, left her daughter a bed and some household items in her 1773-will. She chose neighbor Benjamin Beasley her guardian 6 May 1774.
    Although another John Burton had wife, Sarah, this one named a son Benjamin, presumably after Sarah’s father.
    John did not appear in his father’s will for he died by 14 February 1797 when the Chesterfield County court granted Sarah Burton and Charles Burton administration of his estate. Sarah was evidently John’s widow as she later consented from a daughter to marry.
    A chancery court suit in September 1800 identified John’s heirs.
    William Burton [7120.2.2.6.2.3.1] was a legatee of the 1801-will of his paternal grandfather. He chose Miles Cary his guardian April 1801. With surety his brother-in-law John Burton, William married Susanna Rigsby, daughter of Henry Rigsby, in Chesterfield County 28 November 1811.
    Elizabeth Burton [7120.2.2.6.2.3.2] was a legatee of the 1801-will of her aunt Sally Burton.
    Mary Burton [7120.2.2.6.2.3.3] married Samuel Hardin Pankey in Chesterfield County 11 October 1798. Her first cousin and husband represented his wife and her siblings in the lawsuit of 1800.
    Frances Burton [7120.2.2.6.2.3.4], called “Frankey.”
    Sarah Burton [7120.2.2.6.2.3.5], called “Sally,” daughter of John Burton, deceased, married John Burton in Chesterfield County 5 October (bond) 1809.
    Benjamin Burton [7120.2.2.6.2.3.6].
    William Burton [7120.2.2.6.2.4], who inherited “2 Negroes,” was head of a household of one white and one black in Chesterfield County in 1783.
    This individual may have been the William Burton who died by 1791 when Henry Hatcher, administrator, delivered the inventory of his estate in Chesterfield County. Burton held property in Mecklenburg County also.
    Frances Burton [7120.2.2.6.2.4.1] was a legatee of the 1801-will of her paternal grandfather.
    John Burton [7120.2.2.6.2.4.2] was a legatee of the 1801-will of his aunt Sally Burton.
    Mary Burton [7120.2.2.6.2.5] married William Gibson who died by 1801 in Bedford County.
    Nancy Gibson [7120.2.2.6.2.5.1] was a legatee of the 1801-will of her maternal grandfather and of her aunt Sally Burton. She married Henry Hancock in Chesterfield County 17 September 1801.
    John Gibson [7120.2.2.6.2.5.2] was named in the 1788-will of his uncle Hardin Burton.
    Hannah Burton [7120.2.2.6.2.6] married William Cary.
    Elizabeth Cary [7120.2.2.6.2.6.1] was a legatee of the 1801-will of her aunt Sally Burton.
    Sally Burton [7120.2.2.6.2.7] (-1801), who never married, left a will in Chesterfield County (will dated 1 Oct. 1801 , recorded 11 Jan. 1802 ). She left bequests to brothers, nieces and nephews.
    Charles Burton [7120.2.2.6.2.8].
    Hardin Burton [7120.2.2.6.2.9] predeceased his father. His will in Chesterfield County (will dated 8 Jan. 1788 , recorded 10 April 1788 ) speaks of brothers and sisters. Among his heirs was sister Sally Burton. He mentioned also nephew Samuel Hardin Pankey.
    Samuel Burton [7120.2.2.7] received one shilling from his father’s will. One Judith Nunnally bore an illegitimate child of this name by 1732 when the churchwardens of Henrico Parish bound him out to Thomas Cheatham. Yet the bastard was likely not a son of the then very elder John Burton.
    Samuel Burton paid tax on one levy and 500 acres in 1736.
    Sarah Burton [7120.2.2.8] married a Jackson.
    Elizabeth Burton [7120.2.2.9] married a Turpin by 1754, although apparently not Philip Turpin who had wife, Elizabeth.
    Jane Turpin [7120.2.2.9.1] was a legatee of the 1757-will of her maternal grandmother.
    Phoebe Burton [7120.2.2.10] married a Johnson.
    Susanna Burton [7120.2.2.11] married a Tanner. She is possibly the mother of John Tanner. See their family
    Ann Burton [7120.2.2.12] was unmarried in 1754.
    Isaac Burton [7120.2.3] (c.1667-c.1740) paid quit rents on 100 acres in Henrico County in 1704. This was undoubtedly the tract of this measure his father gave him in 1685. Isaac sold the land to John Bolling 2 September 1735. Isaac may have been the father of Abraham Burton who appeared briefly in the records of Bristol Parish and Brunswick County.
    Abraham Burton [7120.2.4] (1669-1736) married Anne Featherstone. See their family
    Anne Burton [7120.2.5] married Bartholomew Stovall in Henrico County 8 August (license) 1693. Stovall appeared as a headright for Richard Kennon in 1690 and John Stewart Jr. in 1705. He held 100 acres in Henrico County in 1704.
    Stovall lived on land south of the James River that he sold to John Wooldridge in 1712.
    Bartholomew died in Henrico County (will dated 14 Jan. — , recorded 1 May 1721 ). His torn and partially-missing will identified three sons and one daughter. His wife, Anne, survived him. Deeds identify other children and seem to account for all the Stovalls in Southside Virginia.
    Anne married second John Saunders by 16 August 1722. In 1725 the court ordered Saunders to comply with a previous order regarding her orphans, he having married the Stovall widow, Anne.
    George Stovall [7120.2.5.1] of Goochland County sold two tracts of 450 acres on the south side of the James River in Goochland County to John Sanders 19 May 1730. Elizabeth, wife of George, relinquished her dower right in the land. One portion was a patent of 400 acres he got in 1727. He held also 400 acres on Deep Creek in 1727.
    William Stovall [7120.2.5.2] sold the land he inherited from his father to Allen Howard in 1734. Judith relinquished her dower right in the land.
    William was dead by 18 May 1736 when Judith presented his estate inventory.
    Thomas Stovall [7120.2.5.3] sold the 50 acres he inherited from his father to John Sanders Sr. in 1733. His wife, Betty, relinquished her dower right in the land. The same day Sanders sold Stovall 200 acres on Little Deep Creek.
    Hannah Stovall [7120.2.5.4] married John Learwood. Together they sold the 50 acres she inherited from her father to John Sanders in 1733.
    Bartholomew Stovall [7120.2.5.5] got a patent to 250 acres on Stovall’s Creek next to George Stovall in 1732. With Thomas Walker he secured a patent to 400 acres on the west side of Dispute Branch in Goochland County 27 September 1729. When Stovall and Walker sold half their patent in 1730, Mary relinquished her dower right in the land.
    Bartholomew Stovall Jr. [7120.2.5.5.1] married Tabitha Moss in Cumberland County 4 September (bond) 1750.
    Margaret Stovall [7120.2.5.6] married Luke Wiles. A Quaker, she witnessed the 1726-will of Thomas Atkinson. In 1726 George Stovall gave 60 acres on the south side of the James River to Luke Wiles, “for good will & respect for my brother-in-law and Margaret, his wife.”
    Hagar Stovall [7120.2.5.7] (-1723) was evidently a daughter of Bartholomew Stovall. She married William Tabor (1671-1713) and was the mother of William Tabor and John Tabor to whom Bartholomew gave 130 acres in 1719. On 15 February 1733/4 these two Tabor men, George Stovall, and their wives sold 65 acres to Allen Howard. The deed relates the history of the ownership of the land. The same parties sold another 65 acres to Isham Randolph in 1734.
    William Tabor witnessed the will of Thomas Holmes in Henrico County in 1691. Tabor, who swore in 1698 that he was twenty-seven, engaged Peter Indian as an indentured servant in 1702. He was dead by 26 November 1713 when the court ordered an inventory of his estate that Hagar delivered.
    Hagar died by 7 October 1723 when John Tabor, the executor, presented her now lost will. The Orphans Court of October 1725 ordered John Tabor to comply with orders relating to orphans of Hagar Tabor. So evidently Hagar had more than just these two sons.
    William Tabor [7120.2.5.7.1] married Rachel. He sold 88 acres on White Oak Branch in Goochland County to John Hughes in 1735 that he had patented a year earlier. In the vicinity of Deep Creek of Goochland County he secured three patents to tracts of 400 acres each in 1737. William got a patent to 400 more acres among the branches of Deep Creek in Goochland County in 1744.
    John Tabor [7120.2.5.7.2] married Mary. Together they sold 400 acres on the south side of the James River to Isham Randolph in 1734. This was likely Tabor’s patent for this measure of land he held since 1727. He got another 400 acre in Goochland County on the branches of Deep Creek in Goochland County in 1738.
    John Stovall [7120.2.5.8], with his posited brother Bartholomew Stovall, got a patent to 200 acres on Stovall’s Creek in Goochland County September 1732. When they sold a 10-acre portion in 1734, Dorcas Stovall signed the deed. Thomas Holmes, whose will the husband of Hagar Stovall witnessed, had a daughter named Dorcas Holmes, still unwed in 1691. Perhaps this was she. John had no wife when he sold 100 acres to John Hughes in 1735 so perhaps Dorcas was a Stovall sister or wife. John sold another 100 acres to Thomas Dupre 9 March 1735/6.




    Father: Richard Burton b: ABT 1580
    Mother: Katherine Christian b: ABT 1585

    Marriage 1 Susannah Hatcher b: ABT 1641 in Henrico Co., VA
    • Married: 1663 in Henrico Co., VA
    Children
    1. Has No Children Thomas Burton b: 1664 in Henrico Co., VA
    2. Has Children John Burton b: 1666 in Henrico Co., VA
    3. Has No Children Isaac Burton b: 1667 in Henrico Co., VA
    4. Has Children Abraham Burton b: 1669
    5. Has Children Anne Burton b: ABT 1670 in Henrico Co., VA
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