My Sawyer and Touchstone Ancestors

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  • ID: I132
  • Name: Richard TOUCHSTONE
  • Given Name: Richard
  • Surname: Touchstone
  • Sex: M
  • Birth: 1657 in Ireland
  • Death: DEC 1726 in North East, Cecil, Maryland
  • Note:
    Richard Touchstone (b.1657 Ireland) first arrived in America about 1679 in Cecil County Maryland. His son Richard and wife Sarah moved westward to Frederick County, MD, then in the Spring of 1752 moved the entire family to the northeast side of the PeeDee River in Anson County, NC.

    The very first record of the family name TOUCHSTONE was found in Cheshire , which is located in England. The TOUCHSTONE family traces their ancestral roots back to Norman origin before the year 1100. From here they branched and migrated, gaining prosperity as a notable family of England and later other countries.

    TOUCHSTONE FAMILY OF MARYLAND
    By George Ely Russell, C.G., F.A.S.G., F.N.G.S.

    Maryland Genealogical Society Bulletin
    Vol. 37, #3 Summer 1996, pages 289-298


    Richard (1) Touchstone of undetermined origin (en1), was born about 1657 (according to his deposition made in 1727), and was first of record in Maryland when, on 10 February 1679[/80], Thomas Tailor of Dorchester County was granted a warrant for 650 acres of land for having transported into the Province nine women and four men, including Richard Tutchstone. (en2) We may assume that he was an indentured servant, and that, after completing the customary five years service, Richard married and settled in Cecil County where, according to local lore, in about February 1685 Richard's wife carried food to Colonel George Talbot, who had taken refuge in a cave in the granite bluff of Mount Ararat above the mouth of Herring Run on the east side of the Susquehanna River a short distance below the site of the present town of Port Deposit. (en3) At Cecil County Court 8 June 1686 the suit of Owen [Huey / Merray / Morray?] against Richard Touchstone for debt was on the docket; the case was agreed at the 12 June 1688 Court. (en4) In Cecil County, on 20 June 1688, he and Andrew Poulson witnessed Ellinor Ollison's renunciation of the administration of her husband Peter Ollison's estate. On 25 June 1688, a warrant was issued to him and Thomas Casey, directing them to appraise Ollison's personal estate. (en5) According to a deposition made before the Maryland Council on 22 November 1697 by Michael Judd of Baltimore County, innholder, Richard Touchstone and Mr. Amos Nicholls of Cecil County were at Thomas Brown's house in Baltimore County on about 15 October 1697. (en6) At Cecil County Court in 1727, Richard Touchstone, aged 70 years, proprietor of a tract called Mount Ararat, deposed that he had served the County for 43 years, and was seeking appointment as operator of the ferryboat across the Susquehanna River. (en7)

    In Cecil County, he and Edward Jackson appraised the following estates: John Thickpenny's circa 1710, John Comagies' circa 1711, and Patrick Vice's 26 March 1722. On 21 March 1711[/12], he and Thomas Bates appraised the estate of John Johnson of Cecil County. (en8)
    The will of Richard Touchstone, Sr., of Cecil County, planter, was dated 16 December 1726. He appointed his wife Christian executrix and bequeathed to her the lifetime use of his estate, which, after her decease, was to pass to his son Andrew or Andrew's heirs. The will was witnessed by John William, Godfrey Hartsfield, and Richard Arindill. Richard died shortly before 13 August 1729, on which date his widow Christian and the witnesses proved the will. (en9)

    His personal estate in Cecil County was appraised 23 August 1729 by Cornelius MacCormack and Abram Watson at a total value of 40.3.1. The following is a list of his possessions:

    old coat, vest, hat, old shoes
    two old sickles
    old frying pan
    six sheep
    old iron pot & two new ones
    parcell of old pewter
    old bed, old rug & one coverlet
    two old books
    an old saddle
    an iron box & heaters
    two pair of old wool cards
    old grindstones & an old grubing hoe
    two old axes, 4 old hoes & one drawing knife
    old plough share & coulter & two link
    small parcel of earthen ware
    15 pounds of wool
    one woollen wheel
    3 cows, 3 calves
    1 heifer, 1 yearling
    one barrow, two sows
    one pigg
    one young horse
    one young mare
    one old mare & colt
    1266 pounds of tobacco
    24 bushells of wheat
    small parcell of lumber

    The inventory was approved by principal creditors Robert Story & Company and John Piggott, and by relations Christopher, Henry, and Richard Touchstone, and filed on 4 December 1729 by executrix Christian Touchstone. (en10) On 15 March 1730[/31] she filed her account, listing disbursements of 8.7.10 and a remaining balance of 31.15.6. (en11)

    Identification of the children of Richard Touchstone and his only known wife Christian is complicated by the absence of church, land, and other records specifying such relationships. (There was no legal requirement that he name all of his children in his will.) For the purposes of this genealogy, we are assuming that all of the Touchstones of the next generation early in Cecil County were their children, as follows [order uncertain]:

    + 1i. Robert (2) Touchstone.
    + 2ii. Andrew Touchstone.
    + 3iii. Henry Touchstone.
    + 4iv. Christopher Touchstone.
    + 5v. Richard Touchstone.
    + 6vi. Mary Touchstone, m. Robert Ratcliffe.

    1. Robert (2) Touchstone, possibly a son of Richard and Christian Touchstone of Cecil County, died there shortly before 19th day. 7th month [September] 1712, on which date John Ward entered his Bond as administrator of the estate of Robert Touchstone. At several subsequent Cecil County Courts, Ward was cited, being ordered to bring in the inventory of Touchstone's personal estate. The inventory was finally exhibited at the Cecil County Court and Ward's account of his administration was filed in August 1714, showing that the entire estate valued at only 7.2.11 had been disbursed to Mr. Peregrine Frisby, John Osler, Thomas Tanner, and John Atkey. (en12) We have not found any evidence that Robert owned real property, married, or left any issue.

    2. Andrew (2) Touchstone, son of Richard and Christian Touchstone of Cecil County, was so identified in his father's 1726 will [see above], by which Andrew was to receive all of his father's estate upon the death of his mother Christian. He probably married circa 1723 [wife's name unknown], remained in Cecil County, and lived there on his father's estate. Andrew married, secondly, Sarah (-?-) Rutter, widow of John Rutter of Cecil County, between 11 August 1756, when, as Sarah Rutter, she filed the inventory of Rutter's estate, 13 and 20 August 1757, when, as wife of Andrew Touchstone, she filed her first account of administration on the estate of John Rutter. (en14) On 9 March 1758 and again on 20 March 1759 Sarah and Andrew were granted commissions to pass their final accounts of administration of Rutter's estate, returnable in three months. (en15)

    On 4 August 1757, Andrew Touchstone certified before Cecil County Justice Benjamin Chew about finding a stray mare about four years old. (en16) By deed dated 9 March 1765, Andrew Touchstone of Cecil County, farmer, and wife Sarah, sold to William Rutter of Cecil County, blacksmith, for 30, all of her right as widow of John Rutter to a 97 acre part of North East Manor on the North East River, originally leased to John Rutter 7 May 1745. (en17) On 11 March 1767, Andrew assigned a lease to Thomas Taggart, "in consideration for his becoming bail for me to Henry Baker for 14.19.5," and costs of two suits." On 22 January 1765, Andrew Touchstone purchased from Patrick Hamilton, gentleman, and wife Anna Hamilton of Kent Island, Queen Anne's County, 114-acre parts of Gotham Bush and Hearts Delight at the mouth of Bateman's Fresh Run on Susquehanna River in Cecil County. To finance the purchase price of 342, Andrew and wife Sarah, with Charles Porter as his security, obtained a mortgage from Hamilton on 23 January 1765. (en19) In the Cecil County 1766 Debt Book, Andrew was listed as possessor of the tract called Hearts Delight. (en20) On the Cecil County Rent Rolls Andrew Touchston was shown as possessor of 114-acre Gothams Bush. (en21) Andrew Touchstone of Cecil County, having "paid a very inconsiderable part of the purchase money" for these two tracts, defaulted on the mortgage. By deed dated 17 December 1768, Patrick Hamilton of Charles Town, Cecil County, merchant, and Andrew Touchstone sold the two parcels to Charles Porter of Cecil County, Patrick receiving 296.3.4 and Touchstone receiving only a token payment of 5 shillings for his equity. Andrew's wife Sarah released her dower right. (en22)

    No further record of Andrew is found in Maryland. He (or his son of the same name) may be the Andrew Touchstone who served on the First Council of Safety of the Revolutionary Party, in Captain John Barnwell's Company in South Carolina from 14 to 17 July 1775. (en23)

    The Register of Saint Mary Anne's or North Elk Parish in Cecil County contains entries of births for six Touchstone children in the years 1724-1734, parents not identified. For the purposes of this genealogy, we are assuming that the following were children of either Andrew, Henry, or Christopher Touchstone:

    +7i. Jonas (3) Touchstone, b. 10 November 1724.
    8ii. Temperance Touchstone, b. 11 September 1725.
    9iii. Katherine Touchstone, b. 6 November 1727.
    10iv. Christian Touchstone, b. 22 October 1729.
    11v. Andrew Touchstone, b. 1 July 1732.
    12vi. Richard Touchstone, b. 21 May 1734.

    3. Henry (2) Touchstone, possibly a son of Richard and Christian Touchstone of Cecil County, with his known brothers Christopher and Richard Touchstone, as kinsmen, approved the inventory of Richard Touchstone's personal estate, dated in Cecil County 23 August 1729. (en24)

    Henry married Sarah [-?-] and died in Cecil County shortly before 11 November 1735, on which date Sarah Touchstone was bonded for 100 as administratrix of his estate, with John Williams and William Bailey as her sureties. (en25) On 29 November 1735, his personal estate was appraised at 75.4.6, valued by David Breeding and Richard Tompson. The inventory was approved by principal creditors Joseph Jadwine and Robert Sagert and by kinsmen (identified as his brothers) Christopher and Richard Touchstone, and filed 10 March 1735 by the administratrix Sarah Touchstone. 26 On 14 February 1736, she filed her account of administration, listing the inventory value of 75.8.0, disbursements of 33.7.2, and a remaining balance of 42.0.10. Her securities were John Williams and William Bailey. (en27) On 12 September 1738, Sarah, now wife of Thomas Henry, was commissioned to pass an additional account of Henry Touchstone's estate, returnable in three months. On 16 November 1738, an additional account was filed by Sarah, wife of Thomas Henry of Cecil County, listing
    disbursements of 10.16.21 and a remaining balance of 23.4.1. (en29)

    The children, if any, of Henry and Sarah Touchstone have not been identified. It is possible that the children born in St. George's Parish, Cecil County, in the period 1724-1734 [listed under No. 2 Andrew (2) above] could have been the children of either Henry or his brother Christopher.

    4. Christopher (2) Touchstone, possibly a son of Richard and Christian Touchstone of Cecil County, is first of record on 15 February 1723 when he witnessed the will of Edward Harris of Baltimore County. (en30) On 23 August 1729, as a kinsman, he approved the inventory of Richard Touchstone's personal estate in Cecil County. (en31) On 29 November 1735, he approved the inventory of the personal estate of his brother Henry Touchstone of Cecil County. (en32) In 1740, he served as a Corporal in Captain Edward Jackson's Foot Company in the Cecil County Militia. In about April 1747, Chris: Tutchstone and James Harrison appraised the personal estate of Abraham Wattson of Cecil County. (en34) Subsequent records of a Christopher Touchstone in Anson County, North Carolina, in 1759 and 1761 probably pertain to a son of Richard (2) Touchstone [see #14 below].

    5. Richard (2) Touchstone, possibly a son of Richard and Christian Touchstone of Cecil County, is first of record on 25 February 1717 when, at St. George's Parish Church in Baltimore [now Harford] County, he married Sarah Johnson (en35), born in that Parish 18 September 1701, daughter of Daniel and Frances Johnson (en36) of Eightropp plantation, Spesutia Island, in Baltimore [now Harford] County. (en37)

    In the period 1720-1734, Richard (or his father of the same name) was possessor of a part of the 840 acre tract Perry Point in Cecil County. (en38) By deed dated 16 February 1724, Richard Touchstone of Baltimore County, weaver, purchased 50-acre Freeland's Mount in Baltimore County from George Freeland, and on the same day conveyed it to Alexander Urquhart. (en39) On 23 August 1729, Richard, as a kinsman, approved the inventory of the personal estate of Richard Touchstone of Cecil County. (en40) On 27 October 1731, he, of Baltimore County, and the other sons-in-law of Daniel Johnson sold 60-acre Johnson's Island in Baltimore County to Stephen Onion of Cecil County. (en 41)

    Before 1733, Richard settled in Monocacy Hundred in Prince George's [Frederick after 1748] County, where his name appeared on the 1733 list of taxables, with one tithable adult male in his household. (en42) His name was on a 1734 list of planters in Monocacy Hundred who "had no tobacco burnt. (en43) On 25 March 1734, he leased a 100 acre lot in Carroll's Manor, Monocacy Hundred, from Charles Carroll of Annapolis. (en44) On 29 November 1735, Richard, described as "of Manoakasey," as a kinsman, approved the inventory of the personal estate of his brother Henry Touchstone, late of Cecil County. (en45) The second additional administration account of the estate of Daniel Johnson, filed in Baltimore County 23 October 1736 by Johnson's remarried widow Frances Foy, included 3 paid to Richard Touchstone, who married one of the daughters of the deceased, in part of his wife's portion. (en46) In Prince George's County on 13 August 1739, Richard [signed by mark "R"] Touchstone and Jaynes Hyat were sureties on Mary Ratcliffe's 150 bond as administratrix of Robert Ratcliffe's estate. (en47)
    On 15 October 1739, Daniel Johnson Low of Prince George's County assigned a land warrant to [his uncle] Richard Tuchstone, and on 6 March 1739[/40] Peter Dent, Deputy Surveyor of Prince George's County, laid out to Richard a 150 acre tract called Anchor & Hope, beginning on the north side of Catoctin Creek. The parcel was patented to Richard on 20 June 1740. (en48) By deed dated 15 November 1751, Richard Tuchston, weaver, of Frederick County, sold to Michael Creager of Pennsylvania, for 190, the 150 acre Anchor & Hope and 40 acre Batchelors Hall. (en49)

    By renunciation dated in Prince George's County 24 June 1741, Richard Ratcliffe, son of Robert and Mary Ratcliffe, deceased, signed over "unto my uncle" Richard Tutchstone all his rights, title, and part of their estates, and asked that Richard Tutchstone administer the estates "and take care of my brothers part of the estate." (The renunciation was witnessed by Humbertston Lyon, also a resident of Monocacy Hundred.) On 25 June 1741, Richard Tutchstone entered his bond in 100 as administrator of Robert Ratcliffe's remaining estate. Securities on his bond were Humbertson Lyon and Henry Tutchstone. (en50)

    On 14 November 1744, Richard Snowden assigned to Richard Touchstone a warrant for land, and on 18 January 1744/5 Thomas Cresap, Deputy Surveyor of Prince George's County [and brother-in-law of Richard], laid out for Richard a 67 acre parcel of land called Whiskey Alley on the east side of Catoctin Creek at the head of Tom's Bottom. On 21 June 1745, Richard, who signed by mark "R", assigned the tract to Caleb Touchstone for 3.7.0, witnessed by Jarvis Hougham. (en51) Richard and Caleb were listed as possessors of this tract in the 1744 Rent Roll, wherein it was described as being 75 acres. (en52) Also by a warrant assigned by Richard Snowden to Richard Touchstone on 14 November 1744, on 9 February 1744/5 Cresap surveyed and laid out for Richard a 50 acre tract called Chancey on the west side of Catoctin Mountain at the head of a spring that runs to a branch called Prick Run, a draft of Catoctin Creek. Richard assigned this land to Henry Touchstone; witnessed by Jarvis Hougham. (en53) Henry and Richard were listed as possessors of this tract on the 1744 Rent Roll. (en54) By deed dated 9 November 1749, Henry Touchstone of Frederick County, for 25, sold the parcel back to Richard; witnesses were John and William Darnall. (en55) Then, on 22 November 1749, Richard (signing by mark "R") sold the tract to George Moore, Sr., of Prince George's County, for 19.10.0. Richard's wife Sarah released her dower right; witnesses were Thomas Cresap [Sarah's brother-in-law] and Henry Munday. (en56)

    Richard lived on his 150 acre plantation called Anchor & Hope, which was located northwest of the present village of Jefferson in the Middletown Valley of Frederick County. "Richard Touchstone's Road," frequently mentioned in Frederick County records in the period 1749-1763, was part of the route from Frederick Town to Harper's Ferry. It passed westward through "Touchstone's Gap" in the Catoctin Mountain ridge to his farm located on Catoctin Creek. (en57) Richard was appointed overseer of this road in the period 1740-1748. (en58)

    Recorded at the Prince George's County March 1746 Court was a security bond by Richard Touchstone, Joseph Chapline, and John Skidmore, standing as pledges for William Hayward, merchant. (en59) (In 1748 the new Frederick County was formed from the western part of Prince George's County.) At the Frederick County June 1750 Court, Richard served on the grand jury. He was a juror at the March 1750/1 Court held at Kennedy Farrell's dwelling house. At the March 1751/2 Court, he was presented for passing a Spanish gold piece of eight to James Burgess for 7 shillings, 6 pence. (en60)

    By deed dated 15 April 1751, Richard purchased from Caleb Touchstone 40-acre Batchelor's Hall, beginning at the head of a branch that runs into Abraham's [Catoctin] Creek between the [Catoctin and South] Mountains. (en61) As stated above, on 15 November 1751, Richard sold this tract to Michael Creager. In the Spring of 1752, the entire family migrated southward to Anson County, North Carolina, where they settled on the northeast side of the PeeDee River. By deed dated 12 April 1753, Richard purchased 300 acres there from John Francis. (en62) On 1 May 1754, Richard conveyed this tract, now described as 302 acres, to Stephen Touchstone. (en63) The original will of Richard Touchstone of Anson County was dated 16 February 1757 and signed by mark "T". [One-twelfth of each of the two pages is now missing.] Richard made the following bequests: "To my sons Fredrick and Christopher, 300 acres which I bought of John Francis, and 140 acres adjoining, which I took up and surveyed myself. To my daughter Mary, the feather bed which was her grandmother's. To my daughter Rachel, the bed which I now lie on, after my wife Sarah's decease. To my wife Sarah, all the rest of my estate, real and personal, except 15 Maryland money to be paid to William Wratlif and also 15 to [Anselus?] Wratlif (en64) in Maryland money. After my wife's death, the estate to be equally divided amongst all my children. To my son Fredrick, a gray stone colt which came of the long mane mare. To my [section missing] a black colt which came [missing]. To my grandson Richard Touchstone, my [missing] and colt. I do [appoint] Sarah my wife and Fredrick my son, executors]." Witnesses: John Rutter, John Low, Caleb Touchstone. (en65) Richard's wife Sarah's death probably occurred soon after his. An inventory of the estate of Richard & Sarah Touchstone, deceased, was filed [no date] in Anson County, signed by Henry and Frederick Touchstone. The following items were listed:

    1 feather bed and furniture
    1 bedstead
    3 pewter dishes
    15 pewter plates
    17 spoons
    1 punch bowl
    2 iron pots
    1 cross-cut saw
    1 hand saw
    1 drawing knife
    1 ax
    2 bells
    1 schur and cutter
    1 great clevis
    1 haw
    2 old bridles
    1 man's saddle
    1 Bible & testament
    1 primmer
    some tea ware
    1 chest and old box
    1pair of stilliards
    I pair of fire tongs
    2 auger
    I hawell
    I hammer
    9 case knives and forks
    2 iron wedges
    2 plain irons

    1 jointer iron
    I hackle
    1 powdering tub
    1 rum barrel
    1 piggin
    1 two year old mare
    100 weights of pork
    2 clevis boatts
    2 black bottles
    I glass
    1 box iron
    20 head of horses & rnares
    13 head of cattle
    3 yearling hides
    1 churn
    1 washing tub
    I meal barrel
    I pail
    I mare & colt
    2068 of pork




    The will identifies the following children of Richard and Sarah (Johnson) Touchstone:

    +13 i. Frederick (3) Touchstone.
    +14 ii. Christopher Touchstone.
    15 iii. Mary Touchstone.
    16 iv. Rachel Touchstone.

    Anson County Land Records identify two additional heirs-at-- law. (en66)

    +17 v. Henry Touchstone.
    +18 vi. Stephen Touchstone.

    Contemporary with Henry (3) in Frederick County, Maryland, and with Henry and his brothers in Anson County, were the following men, whom we suggest were additional sons of Richard and Sarah (Johnson) Touchstone:

    +19 vii. Caleb Touchstone.
    +20 viii. Daniel Touchstone.

    6. Mary (3) Touchstone, possibly a daughter of Richard and Christian Touchstone of Cecil County, Maryland, married Robert Ratcliffe. They settled in Monocacy Hundred, Prince George's [later Frederick] County, before 1733, in which year Robert was on the fist of taxables there. (en67) He died shortly before 13 August 1739, on which date Mary Ratcliffe was bonded for 150 as administratrix of Robert's estate in Prince George's County, with Richard Touchstone and James Hyat as her sureties. On 21 June 1740, the inventory of his personal estate was filed in Prince George's County by Mary Ratcliffe, administratrix. It was appraised at 169.16.6 by Thomas Prather, Sr., and John Perins, and approved by kinsmen James Hyett and William Gooden, who had married daughters of the deceased. On the same date, Mary Ratcliffe filed her administration account, listing disbursements of 110.3.11, leaving a balance of 159.12.7. (en70) Mary died before 24 June 1741, on which date Richard Ratcliffe, son to Robert and Mary Ratcliffe, deceased, signed "over unto my uncle Richard Touchstone all my right title and part of my estate of my deceased father and mother Robert and Mary so far as to administer and to take care of my brothers part of the estate." On 25 June 1741 Richard Touchstone entered his bond for 100 as administrator of the remaining estate, with Humbertson Lyon and Henry Touchstone of Prince George's Co as his securities. (en71) When Mary's brother Richard Touchstone made his will in Anson County, North Carolina, 16 February 1767, he bequeathed 15 Maryland money each to William and [Anselus?] Wratlif. (en72)




    Children of Robert and Mary (Touchstone) Ratcliffe include the following:

    21 i[daughter], in. before 1740, James Hyett/HyatPrince George's County.
    22 ii.[daughter], in. before 1740, William Gooden.
    23 iii.Richard Ratcliffe, adult by 1741.
    24 iv.William Ratcliffe, living in 1757.
    25 v.[Anselus?] Ratcliffe, living in 1757.

    7. Jonas (3) Touchstone, parents not named, was born 10 November 1724, according to the register of Saint Mary Anne's North Elk) Parish in Cecil County, Maryland. Jonas Touchstone, among the men who requested a pardon for Hamilton and Hunt (petition recorded at the North Carolina Council meeting held at Bern on 1 October 1751. (en73) This man, or a younger man of the same name, was listed on the roll of Captain Andrew Cummings' Company of Volunteer Militia in Saltcatchers and Edisto District, Colleton County Regiment of Foot, South Carolina, 30 October 1776. (en74) This is the same man who was a private in Captain James Jones's Edisto Company of Colonel Robert Ballingall's Regiment in the Colleton County, South Carolina, Militia, credited with 102 days service during the Revolutionary War. (en75) Jonas Touchstone was a head of household in the southern part of Orangeburgh District, South Carolina, in 1790, with three females and two boys in his family. (en76) In the 1800 Census of the Orangeburgh side of Edisto River in South Carolina, Jonas, aged over 45 years, was head of a household composed of one woman aged over 45 years, two women aged 26-45 years, two men aged 16 to 26 years, one boy aged 10 to 16 years, and two boys aged under 10 years. (en77)

    The Orangeburgh Jonas is to be distinguished from another Man of this name, listed in the 1790 Census of Guilford County, Salisbury District, North Carolina, his household being composed of one man aged over 16 years [himself] and three females. That Jonas Touchstone left a will dated in Guilford County 23 March 1815, naming wife Sarah, daughters Jean Delay and Mary Ross, and grandson Jonas Ross. (en78)

    13. Frederick (3) Touchstone, a younger son of Richard and Sarah (Johnson) Touchstone, was appointed co-executor with his mother by his father's will, dated in Anson County, North Carolina, 16 February 1757, by which he and his brother Christopher were to inherit and divide between them two tracts of land on the north side of PeeDee River: 300 acres which Richard bought from John Francis and an adjoining 140 acres which Richard surveyed himself. To Frederick was bequeathed a colt. (en79) Frederick and [his brother] Henry signed the (undated) inventory of their parents' estate.

    Frederick married Rose/Rosanna Ashley, a daughter of John and Mary Ashley of Anson County, so named in her father's will dated 1 February 1759, which was witnessed by Christopher and Frederick Touchstone. By Anson County deed dated 15 January 1763, he paid 20 to [brother] Henry Touchstone for 250 acres on the east side of Little River at Lake Island, originally sold to Richard Touchstone by John Francis and from Richard descended to Henry. (en80) By deed dated 8 August 1763, he and wife Rose conveyed land to John Usery. (en81) On 19 September 1771, Frederick was granted 200 acres on Cedar Creek in Craven County, North Carolina.

    The family migrated to South Carolina. On 9 October 1775, Frederick Touchstone enrolled in Captain Andrew Cummings' Company of Volunteer Militia in Saltcatcher and Edisto District of Colleton County Regiment of Foot. During the war, he served 102 days as a Private in Captain James Jones's Edisto Company, Colonel Robert Ballingall's Regiment, Colleton County Militia. (en82) On 5 June 1786, he was granted 200 acres in Orangeburgh District. In 1790, Frederick was head of a household in the southern part of Orangeburgh County, his family consisting of three men aged over 16, two boys aged under 16, four females, and one slave. (en13) He was not listed as a head of household there in the South Carolina 1800 Census.

    The will of Frederick Touchstone, Sr., of Barnwell County [formed from Orangeburgh in 1798] was dated 19 April 1808. "My wife Rosanna is to have all the estate as long as she lives, and then after she dies [to be divided] equal among my heirs." Two slaves "I reared for Elizabeth Touchstone, daughter of Stephen Touchstone," are to go against the account which I have with her. (en85)

    14. Chrisopher (3) Touchstone, a younger son of Richard and Sarah (Johnson) Touchstone, by his father's will dated in Anson County, North Carolina, 16 February 1757, was to share with his brother Frederick two tracts of land on the north side of PeeDee River (as described above). On 1 February 1759, in Anson County, Christopher witnessed the will of John Ashley. By Anson County deed dated 4 May 1761, Christopher and Stephen Touchstone purchased land from James Sanders. (en86)

    Before 1775, Christopher moved to South Carolina. His name (signed by mark "T") was on a list of men in Saltcatchers and Edisto District, Colleton County, who enrolled on 9 October 1775 in Captain Andrew Cummings' Company of Volunteer Militia. (en87) In the period 1780-1782, he served 102 days as a Private in Captain James Jones's Edisto Company, Colonel Robert Ballingall's Regiment, Colleton County Militia. In 1790, Christopher was head of a household in the southern part of Orangeburgh County, South Carolina, his family consisting of one man aged over 16 (himself), three boys aged under 16, and four females. (en89)

    He is not found listed as head of a household in South Carolina in 1800. He or a younger man of the same name settled in Georgia, where he was of Greene County when he drew a lot in the 1807 Georgia Land Lottery. He appeared in an early tax list of Glynn County, Georgia, taxed for 10 shillings, 6 pence, having been assessed for 200 acres of second-quality land, 200 acres of other land, one free white male aged over 21, eight free white persons, and five slaves. (en90)
    17. Henry (3) Touchstone, possibly the oldest son of Richard and Sarah (Johnson) Touchstone, was in Prince George's County on 9 February 1744/5 when Richard Touchstone assigned over to Henry the 50 acre tract called Chancey on the west side of Catoctin Mountain at the head of a spring that runs to a branch called Prick Run, a draft of Catoctin Creek. The tract was patented to Henry on 18 March 1746. (en91) Henry was married to Sarah [-?-] by 9 November 1749, on which date he sold the 50-acre Chancey back to Richard Touchstone for 25, his wife Sarah releasing her dower right. (en92) At the Frederick County November 1751 Court, William House's suit against Henry Touchstone for a debt was settled amicably. (en93)

    In about the spring of 1752, Richard and his sons migrated to North Carolina, where they settled on the PeeDee River in Anson County. On 18 July 1752, Henry Touchstone purchased 200 acres in Anson County from Joseph White. (en94) On 2 October 1755, Henry and his wife sold this land to Thomas Prestwood. (en95) Henry served as a juror at a coroner's inquest held at Young's Island, PeeDee River, Anson County, on 13 June 1753. (en96) Soon after 16 February 1757 (the date of Richard Touchstone's will), Henry and Frederick Touchstone signed the inventory of the personal property of Richard and Sarah Touchstone, deceased. (en97) On 10 May 1760, Henry was granted a patent for 140 acres in Anson County on the south side of Little River joining the mouth of a gut, a road, the Walnut Branch, old lines, the land Richard Touchston bought of John Francis, and the north side of PeeDee River. (en98) On 10 April 1761, he was granted another patent, for 150 acres in Anson County on the northeast side of the PeeDee River, joining the east side of North Fork of Mountain Creek, both sides of Brooms Branch, and both sides of the creek. (en99) On 15 January 1763, Henry sold to Frederick Touchstone for 20 his share in the 250 acres on the east side of Little River at Lake Island originally sold to Richard Touchstone by John Francis. (en100) By deed dated 8 August 1763, Henry and Frederick Touchstone sold Richard Touchstone's land to John Usery. (en101) Land formerly his on the east side of Little River in Anson County was mentioned in an April 1771 patent to William Leak. (en102) Land formerly his on Brown Branch in the fork of Mountain Creek, northeast of PeeDee River, in Anson County, was mentioned in a March 1775 patent to Samuel Snead. (en103)

    On 2 April 1773, Henry Touchstone was granted 300 acres on Edisto River in Colleton Comity, South Carolina. (en104) Henry Sr. may still have been living on 30 October 1775 when a Henry Touchstone, Jr., was enrolled in Captain Andrew Cummings' Company of Volunteer Militia, Saltcatcher and Edisto District, Colleton County. (en105) But Henry, Sr., is not found listed anywhere as a head of family in the South Carolina 1790 Census.

    18. Stephen (3) Touchstone, possibly a son of Richard and Sarah (Johnson) Touchstone, was among the members of this family who migrated from Frederick County, Maryland, in the Spring of 1752 to Anson County, North Carolina, where they settled on the northeast side of the PeeDee River. Stephen served as a juror on 13 June 1753 at an Anson County coroner's inquest held at Young's Island, PeeDee River. (en106) In Anson County by deed dated 1 May 1754, Stephen Touchstone acquired 302 acres from Richard Touchstone, land previously purchased by Richard from John Francis. (en107) By Anson County deed dated 16 October 1754, Stephen acquired 200 acres from Caleb Touchstone, land originally granted to Caleb on 25 February 1754. (en108) By deed dated 4 May 1761, Christopher and Stephen Touchstone conveyed land in Anson County to James Sanders. (en109) In 1767 (or 1768), Stephen Touchstone and wife Anne sold to John Erwin land in Anson [later Montgomery] County, which Stephen had purchased from Caleb Touchstone (see above), (en110) According to an Anson County Militia muster roll dated 19 November 1770, Captain Stephen Touchstone had resigned as commander of the Mountain Creek Company. (en111)

    In December 1768, Stephen arrived at Savannah, Georgia and settled at Queensboro. (en112) Two different men named Stephen Touchstone were listed in the 1790 Federal census, one in the southern part of Orangeburgh County, South Carolina, his household consisting of two men aged over 16, four boys aged under 16, four females, and thirteen slaves, the other in Montgomery County, Salisbury District, North Carolina, his household consisting of two men aged 16 or more, one boy aged under 16, two females, and seven slaves. The will of Frederick Touchstone of Barnwell County, South Carolina, dated 19 April 1808, mentioned two slaves reared for Elizabeth, daughter of Stephen Touchstone.

    19. Caleb (3) Touchstone, possibly a son of Richard and Sarah (Johnson) Touchstone, was an adult by 30 January 1745 when he was granted a land warrant for 60 acres, for which Thomas Cresap, Deputy Surveyor of Prince George's County, Maryland, on 8 July 1746 laid out 10-acre Rich Thickett beginning on the north side of a branch which runs into Ballinger's Creek on the [east] side of the [Catoctin] Mountain. This tract was patented to Caleb on 29 October 1747. (en113) On 21 June 1745, Richard Touchstone assigned to Caleb his rights to 67-acre Whiskey Alley, surveyed by Cresap 18 January 1744/5, located on the east side of Catoctin Creek at the head of Tom's Bottom, and patented to Caleb on 18 March 1746. (en114) Based on Caleb's 30 January 1745 land warrant, on 8 July 1746 Cresap surveyed for him 40-acre Batchelors Hall beginning at the head of a branch which runs into Abraham's [Catoctin] Creek between the [Catoctin and South] Mountains, which was patented to Caleb on 19 October 1747. (en115) These two parcels of land were located in the southern part of the Catoctin or Middletown Valley of what became Frederick County in 1748. In the Prince George's County Rent Roll for 1744, Caleb and Richard Touchstone were listed as possessors of 75-acre Whiskey Alley. (en116) In the 1746 Rent Roll, Caleb was listed as possessor of 40-acre Batchellors Hall and 10-acre Rich Thickett. (en117) In the Frederick County Debt Books for 1753-1756, Caleb was shown as possessor of 10-acre Rich Thickett and 10-acre Whiskey Alley. (en118) By deed dated 20 November 1750, Caleb sold to Philip Kiefalper for 40 the 67-acre Whiskey Alley on the east side of Catoctin Creek at the head of Toni's Bottom. (en119) By deed dated 8 March 1751, Caleb sold to Daniel Touchstone for 20 a negro boy named Newmon. Witnesses to the sale were Daniel and Richard Touchstone. (en120) By deed dated 15 April 1751, Caleb, still of Frederick County, sold to Richard Touchstone the 40-acre Batchelor's Hall, originally patented to Caleb on 13 January 1745, located at a branch that runs into Abraham's [Catoctin] Creek. (en121)

    In the Spring of 1752, the entire family migrated to Anson County, North Carolina, settling on the northeast side of the PeeDee River. By Anson County deeds dated 16 February and 19 October 1753, Caleb purchased 400 acres from Will Phillips. (en122) At Young's Island, PeeDee River, on 13 June 1753 Caleb served as a juror for the Anson County coroner's inquest on the body of Bryan Ponn, a drowned man. (en123) On 17 November 1753, Caleb was granted 197 acres in Anson County joining the lower side of Cheek Creek. (en124) On 25 February 1754, 200 acres in Anson County were granted to Caleb; on 16 October 1755, he sold this tract to Stephen Touchstone. (en125)

    On 16 February 1757, in Anson County, Caleb witnessed the will of Richard Touchstone. (en126) On 20 April 1763, 50 acres in Anson County were granted to Caleb, located on the northeast side of PeeDee River, adjoining Robert Cannon and said Caleb's other land. (en127) On 22 December 1768, Caleb was granted 50 acres in Anson County, located east of Little River, joining a branch of a deep hollow on the upper side of Cheeks Creek, near Crawford's line. (en128) His land on the northeast side of PeeDee River on the north fork of Mountain Creek was mentioned in May 1772 in a land grant to Stephen Touchstone. (en129) On 18 May 1772, a Land grant was surveyed for him on the Dry Fork of Mountain Creek. (en130) On 23 July 1774, Caleb was granted 150 acres in Anson County, located on Dry Creek of Mountain Creek, joining Touchstone's old survey. (en131) In a July 1774 patent for Benjamin Sumner, Caleb's land northeast of PeeDee River in Anson County was mentioned as adjoining. (en132)

    Caleb lived in that part of Anson County which was set off in 1779 as Montgomery County. On 1 November 1775, he was granted leave to build a water grist mill on Mountain Creek. Caleb and Richard Touchstone were on the Montgomery County 1779 voter list. (en133) Caleb's name appeared on the Montgomery County 1782 tax list, in which he was described as an "invalid" [i.e., aged, exempt from poll tax] owning 600 acres and a negro named Isaac aged either 7-16 or 40-50. (en134) In 1790, Caleb was head of a household in Montgomery County, Salisbury District, his family consisting of two men aged 16 years or more, two boys aged under 16, and five females. (en135)

    In 1800, a Caleb Touchstone witnessed the will of Joseph Lewis of Effingham County, Georgia. In 1805, and again in 1807, Caleb Touchstone, Sr., of Greene County, Georgia, drew a lot in the Georgia Land Lottery.

    20. Daniel (3) Touchstone, possibly a son of Richard and Sarah (Johnson) Touchstone, was an adult by 21 October 1749 when he paid 25 to William Gathen of Frederick County, an Indian, for 101-acre True Will on the west side of Catoctin Creek in Frederick County, Maryland. (en136) In Frederick County on 8 March 1751, he and Richard Touchstone witnessed a deed of sale from Caleb to Daniel Touchstone. (en137)

    In the Spring of 1752, the entire family moved to the northeast side of PeeDee River in Anson County, North Carolina. There, on 10 June 1752, he purchased from Samuel French 100 acres. (en138) On 13 June 1753, he served as a juror on a coroner's inquest held at Young's Island, PeeDee River. (en139) On 6 January 1754, he purchased 500 acres from Jacob Sumeral. (en140) On 16 January 1754, he conveyed land to Benjamin Smith. (en141)

    Daniel settled in South Carolina. His will, dated 15 April 1767 in Craven County, devised his plantation to his wife Elizabeth, with one slave. His son Stephen was to inherit the plantation after Elizabeth's death. Negro slaves and their children were bequeathed to each of his children: Sarah, Elizabeth, Stephen, Solita/Solitha, and Charity. Witnesses were James Brigger, Joseph Wells, and Sarah Touchstone. The will was proved 8 December 1767 in Camden District, South Carolina. (en142)

    Children of Daniel and Elizabeth Touchstone, according to his 1767 will:
    31 i. Sarah (4) Touchstone
    32 ii. Elizabeth Touchstone
    33 iii. Stephen Touchstone
    34 iv. Solit(h)a Touchstone
    35 v.Charity Touchstone

    The following Maryland Touchstone men of undetermined parentage were doubtless grandsons or great-grandsons of Richard (1) Touchstone:

    26. Henry (3) Touchstone married Margret Mahen by the minister of St. Mary Anne's (North Elk) Parish in Cecil County, Maryland, 12 November 1749. This or another Henry was listed in the parish register as father of the following children: (en143)

    36i. Elizabeth Touchstone, b. 6 October 1745.
    37ii. Richard (4) Touchstone, b. 25 September 1749.
    38iii. Temperance Touchstone, b. 16 March 1769.
    39iv. William Touchstone, b. 19 July 1772.

    27. Sampson (4) Touchstone was taxed as a freeman in East Nottingham Township, Chester County, Pennsylvania, in 1768. In 1768, Samson Tuchstone signed a petition in favor of moving the Baltimore County court house from Joppa to Baltimore. (en144) In 1783, as a single man, he was taxed in North Milford and East Nottingham Hundreds, 3rd District, Cecil County, Maryland. (en145)

    A younger Sampson Touchstone, born circa 1771-1776, of Harford County, on 17 July 1814, answered an interrogatory, stating that he was entitled to a life estate in 1/8th part of the real property of Daniel Whitelock of Baltimore County, deceased. Whitelock had died intestate, leaving nine children including Anne (Whitelock) Victory, who had died without issue, wife of Daniel Victory, but was formerly the wife of Sampson Touchstone, according to a petition for sale of Whitelock's real estate filed in Maryland Chancery Court on 16 June 1814. On 9 January 1816, Samuel Donaldson, attorney, certified that Sampson Touchstone, a defendant in the case, was about 50 years of age. On 16 January 1816, Charles Whitelock filed an affidavit stating that Touchstone was between 40 and 45 years of age. The auditor's 9 January 1816 report of the distribution of the Whitelock property sale proceeds included an allowance of $67.85 to Sampson Touchstone in lieu of his life estate in 1/8th of the land sold, being 1/64th of the balance. (en146) In 1804, Sampson was licensed to sell liquors at Havre de Grace. He was head of a household in Cecil County in 1810, and in Harford County in 1820 and 1840. A different Sampson Touchstone, son of William, was in Frederick County, Virginia, in 1812-1820.

    28. John (4) Touchstone, on 2 January 1773 in Cecil County, was bonded for 5O as administrator of the personal estate of Cornelius Lesslie, with James Hunter and Andrew Welsh as his sureties. (en147) As administrator, he filed the inventory of the personal estate of Cornelius Leslie of Cecil County on 21 March 1773. (en148) In 1783, he was taxed for eight white inhabitants in North Susquehanna and Octarara Hundreds, 6th District, Cecil County. (en149) John died in Cecil County shortly before 29 June 1785, on which date his personal estate was appraised at a value of 59.4.6 by Francis Boyd and Robert [Deen?]. The inventory was approved by kinsmen Henry and Benjamin Touchton and filed 11 October 1786 by Sarah Touchstone, administratrix. (en150)

    29. Christopher (4) Touchstone served in the Revolutionary War as a Private in Captain Dobson's 4th Company, 2nd Battalion, Colonel Otho H. William's 6th Maryland Regiment of Foot; enlisted 24 May 1778 and discharged 1 November 1780. He was "in Hospital at Hillsboro [North Carolina] 1 November 1780," and died 8 September 1781. (en151) Based on this service, his heirs drew 50-acre lot #1069 west of Fort Cumberland. (en152) In Cecil County, on 31 October 1785, Samuel Marquis, administrator, filed a list of separate debts due the estate of Christopher Touchstone, claiming a total of 61.6.4 depreciation pay due as a Private in the 6th Regiment. (en153) His wife and children, if any, are not known.

    30. Henry (4) Touchstone, a pauper with property valued at less than 10, lived in Spesutia Upper Hundred, Harford County, in 1783, with six white inhabitants in his household. (en154) Also assessed there in 1783 was another Henry Touchstone, a single man. In 1783, Henry Touchstone was treated by Dr. John Archer of Spesutia Upper Hundred. (en155) Henry Touchton, as kinsman approved the inventory dated 29 June 1785 of the estate of John Touchstone of Cecil County. (en156) In Harford Comity Court in 1787, Henry Touchstone was charged with harbouring a servant of R. Thomas. (en157) In the 1790 census of Harford County, there were two men of this name heading households, one composed of one man, one boy, and two females, the other composed of one man, two boys, and two females. In 1800, Henry Tuchstone, aged 45 years or more, was head of a household in the 2nd District, Harford County, with two men aged 16 to 26 in his household. In 1804 or 1805, Henry Tuchstone gave a bill of sale to John McGredy in Cecil County. (en158)

    END NOTES

    1.Possibly from City of Cork, County Cork, Ireland, where Henry Touchstone had children baptized at Holy Trinity Christ Church in 1661 and 1663.

    2.Maryland Land Office, Patent Records, at Maryland State Archives [MSA], WC2 (1679-1681): 87. Tailor's application was dated 24 January 1679[/80]. In Skordas's transcript of these records, Richard's surname was erroneously read as "Tulchstone."

    3.George Johnston, History of Cecil County, Maryland (Elkton, MD, 1881), pp. 128, 238, 394. This legend is not confirmed by any record evidence.

    4.Cecil County Judgments, 1683-1692, at MSA, pp. 33, 66. These records are not indexed; it is possible that there were additional Touchstone entries.

    5.Maryland Testamentary Proceedings, at MSA, 14 (1687-1692): 77. Richard's surname is spelled "Tutstone." Ollison's inventory, if any, is not found recorded in Maryland Inventories and Accounts. Andrew Poulson was Anders Palsson Mullica of Successor plantation at Sahakitko [Elkton]. Peter Ollison was Peter Olleson Slubey of Colonel George Talbot's Manor at Sahakitko. See Peter S. Craig, The 1693 Census of Swedes on the Delaware (1993), pp127-128, 141 (Slubey), 48-49, 105, 126 (Mullica).

    6.Maryland Council Proceedings, H.D.: 605, in Archives of Maryland, 23:305. Thomas Brown lived in Spesutia Hundred, according to Baltimore County tax lists.

    7.George Johnston, History of Cecil County, Maryland (Elkton, MD, 1881), p. 238. These statements are not confirmed by any primary record evidence.

    8.Maryland Prerogative Court Records, at MSA Inventories and Accounts, 31:434 (Thickpenny), 33A:13 (Comagies), 33B:88 (Johnson); Inventories, 7:273 (Vice).

    9.Maryland Provincial Wills, at MSA, 19:775.

    10.Maryland Inventories, 16:245.

    11.Maryland Accounts, 11 (1731-1733): 175. Maryland Testamentary Proceedings, 29 (1730-1734): 129.

    12.Maryland Testamentary Proceedings, at MSA, 22 (1711-1715): 157, 253, 269, 311, 364, 457. Maryland Inventories and Accounts, 3 6B: 66. The final account is erroneously recorded under the name Richard Tuthstone.

    13.Maryland Inventories, 62:64.

    14.Maryland Accounts, 41 (1757-1758): 153-154. Maryland Testamentary Proceedings, 36 (1753-1757): 417.

    15.Maryland Testamentary Proceedings, 37 (1758-1760): 15, 245.

    16.Cecil County Land Records, 8 (1753-1758): 476.

    17.Cecil County Land Records, 10 (1764-1767): 127-128.

    18.Cecil County Land Records, 10 (1764-1767): 442.

    19.Cecil County Land Records, 10 (1764-1767): 103-107 (deed), 107113 (mortgage).

    20.Cecil County 1766 Debt Book, at MSA, p. 57.

    21.Cecil County Rent Rolls, 1678-1768, at MSA, 6:328.

    22.Cecil County Land Records, 11 (1767-1770): 293.

    23.A. S. Salley, South Carolina Magazine, vol. 1 (1900).

    24.Maryland Inventories, 16:245.

    25.Maryland Testamentary Proceedings, 30 (1734-1738): 118.

    26.Maryland Inventories, 21:271; Maryland Testamentary Proceedings, 30 (1734-1738): 146.

    27.Maryland Accounts, 15 (1736-1737): 324-325. Her account was passed 7 December 1736. [Maryland Testamentary Proceedings, 30 (1734-1738): 222.1 She was granted time to pass an additional account, 21 May 1737. [Ibid., p. 276].

    28.Maryland Testamentary Proceedings, 30:451.
    29.Maryland Accounts, 17 (1739): 62-63; Maryland Testamentary
    Proceedings, 30:485.

    30.Maryland Provincial Wills, 18:265. The other witnesses were
    Thomas Knight and John Hastings.

    31.Maryland Inventories, 16:245.

    32.Maryland Inventories, 21:271.

    33."Colonial Militia, 1740, 1748," in Maryland Historical Magazine 6 (March 1911): 46.

    34.Cecil County Inventories, 3 (1734-1755): 173-173.

    35.St. George's Parish Register, 1692-1799, transcribed b Lucy H. Harrison, p. 256. This church, also known as Spesutia Church, is now located at Perryman, Harford County. The officiating clergyman in 1717 was the Rev. George Irwin.

    36.Ibid,

    37.For a summary account of the Daniel Johnson family, see Robert
    W. Barnes, Baltimore County Families, 1659-1759 (Baltimore:
    Genealogical Publishing Co., 1989), p. 367.

    38.Cecil County Debt Books, pp. 16, 114.

    39.Baltimore County Land Records, IS#H:44, 51. Jon H. Livezey of Aberdeen, MD, a Touchstone and Urquhart descendant and an attorney, explains that Richard was serving as a straw party or front man in this transaction.

    40.Maryland Inventories, 16:245.

    41.Baltimore County Land Records, ISL (1730-1733): 214. The other grantors were Thomas Cresap, William Cannon, Edward Evans, and Robert Cannon, all of Baltimore County.

    42.Proprietary Papers, 1703-1769, Black Book No. 2, at MSA, correctly transcribed in Western Maryland Genealogy 3 (July 1987): 99.

    43.Prince George's County Court Proceedings, 5:98.

    44.Prince George's County Land Records, T: 172.

    45. Maryland Inventories, 21:271.

    46.Baltimore County Administration Accounts, 3:224; Maryland Administration Accounts, 15:203. For Frances Foy, Richard's mother-in-law, see Tracey and Dern, Pioneers of Old Monocacy, pp. 224-225. Frances and her fourth husband, Miles Foy, settled on Broad Run in Monocacy Hundred in 1738, about 4 miles northwest of Richard and Sarah Touchstone.

    47.Prince George's County Bonds, at MSA, box 10, folder 48 (original document).

    48.Maryland Land Patents, Certificates, and Assignments at MSA, EI#5:509 (certificate); EI#4:541 (patent).

    49.Maryland Provincial and General Court Deeds, at MSA, EI#9A (1749-1756): 216-218. Richard signed by mark "R". Witnesses were George Hill, Mathias Ambrossi, and Bernard Wymer. No dower release.

    50. Maryland Testamentary Proceedings, 31:196-197.

    51.Maryland Land Patents, BY&GS#1:187 (certificate); BY&GS-#2:242 (patent issued to Caleb Touchstone 18 March 1746). Tracey map coordinates X-44; plats, p. 2312, sheets 21, 170 (at Carroll County Historical Society, Westminster, MD).

    52.Maryland Rent Rolls, Prince George's County, at MSA, 1744, 3:282.

    53.Maryland Land Patents, Tl# 1:441 (certificate); T1#3:186 (patent issued to Henry Touchstone 18 March 1746).

    54.Maryland Rent Rolls, Prince George's County, 1744, 3:255.

    55.Frederick County Land Records, B:94-95. Henry's wife Sarah released her dower right.

    56.Frederick County Land Records, B:101-103.

    57.Based on the work of Millard M. Rice in New Facts and Old Families, From the Records of Frederick County, Maryland (1976), pp. 56-58; and Grace L. Tracey and John P. Dern in Pioneers of Old.

    58.Prince George's County Court Proceedings.

    59.Prince George's County Court Proceedings.
    60.Millard M. Rice, This Was the Life, Excerpts from the Judgment Records of Frederick County, Maryland, 1748-1765 (1979), pp. 25, 40, 62, 69, 71, 92, 132, 151.

    61.Frederick County Land Records, B:367-369.

    62.Anson County Land Records, 1:352.

    63.Anson County Land Records, 1:502.

    64.Undoubtedly sons of Robert Ratcliffe and wife Mary Touchstone, sister of Richard Touchstone, according to Maryland Testamentary Proceedings, 31:196-197.

    65.Original will, among Craven County Wills, 1748-1941, at Dept. of Archives and History, Raleigh, NC, C.R.028.801.28.

    66.Anson County Land Records, 3:22 (Henry); H#1:41 (Steven).

    67.Western Maryland Genealogy 3:99.

    68.Prince George's County Administration Bonds, at MSA, box 10, folder 48 (original document). Both sureties signed by mark.

    69.Maryland Inventories, 25:24. Prince George's County Probate Records, PD#1:489. Prince George's County Inventories, at MSA, box 11, folder 40 (original document).

    70.Prince George's County Administration Accounts, at MSA, box 1, folder 73 (original document); Maryland Accounts, 17 (1739-1740): 487.

    71.Maryland Testamentary Proceedings, 31:196-197. Richard Ratcliffe signed by mark "R" The renunciation was witnessed by Humbertstone Lyon. Prince George's County Administration Bonds, at MSA, box 11, folder 68; Prince George's County Inventories, box 12, folder 27 (original documents).

    72.Original will, Craven County, NC.

    73.Colonial and State Records of North Carolina, 9:39, 84-85.

    74."First Council of Safety of the Revolutionary Party," South Carolina Historical and Genealogical Magazine, 1:126-127. Jonas was able to sign his name, which was next to the names of John Touchstone and John Cannon on the list.

    75.Murtie June Clark, Loyalists in the Southern Campaign, 1:171--172. 2nd Lt. Henry Touchstone was an officer in the same company.

    76.Heads of Families, South Carolina, 1790 (Washington, DC: GPO), p. 98. Listed on the same page as Christopher Touchstone.

    77.Orangeburgh County, SC, 1800 Census, p. 321. John Touchstone, also aged more than 45 years, was listed on the same page.

    78. Original will, Guilford County, NC, Wills, A:392.

    79.Proved in Craven County. Original will at NC Department of Archives and History.

    80.Anson County Land Records, 3:22.

    81.Anson County Land Records, 3:60. By deed dated 28 April 1767, John and wife Elizabeth Ussery, of Anson County, sold the 300 acres northeast of PeeDee River to Wiliam Leake Of Buckingham Co., VA. [Ibid., H#1:41]

    82.Murtie June Clark, Loyalists in the Southern Campaign, 1:171--172.

    83.Heads of Families, South Carolina, 1790, p. 102. John and Stephen Touchstone were listed on the same page.

    84.A much younger Frederick Touchstone was listed [p. 5131.

    85. South Carolina Wills, vol. 1, section A, p. 101; A:79.

    86.Anson County Land Records, 6:111.

    87.South Carolina Historical and Genealogical Magazine, 1:126-

    88.Murtie J. Clark, Loyalists in the Southern Campaign, 1:171-172.

    89.Heads of Families, South Carolina, 1790, p. 98.

    90.Blair, Early Tax Records of Georgia, p. 29.

    91.Maryland Certificates of Survey, T1#1:441. Jarvis Hougham witnessed the assignment. Maryland Patents, T1#3:186. Henry and Richard Touchstone were shown on the Prince George's County 1744 Rent Roll as possessors of this tract. [Rent Roll 3, p. 255].

    92.Frederick County Land Records, B:94-95. The deed was witnessed by John and William Darnall. Tracey map coordinates DE-45 and EF-44; plat page 9475, sheet 876.

    93.Frederick County Court Judgment Records.

    94.Anson County Land Records, 1:188-189.

    95.Anson County Land Records, C#1:206

    96.Case of Bryan Ponn, drowned. Other jurors were Caleb, Daniel, and Stephen Tuchstone. North Carolina Genealogical Society Journal 1:12.

    97.Original inventory, Anson County Court House.

    98.North Carolina Land Patents, 16:309.

    99.North Carolina Land Patents, 15:341.

    100.Anson County Land Records, 8:22-23.

    101.Anson County Land Records, 3:60.

    102.North Carolina Land Patents, 20:654.

    103.North Carolina Land Patents, 25:272.

    104.South Carolina Land Grants.

    105.South Carolina Historical and Genealogical Magazine 1: 126-127.

    106.Case of Bryan Ponn, drowned. North Carolina Genealogical Society Journal 1:12.

    107.Anson County Land Records, 1:502.

    108.Anson County Land Records.

    109.Anson County Land Records, 6:111

    110.DAR Magazine, vol. 67, no. 1 (Jan.1933), p. 46.

    111.North Carolina State Archives, Mil 2-37.

    112.Historic Families of Georgia, p. 229.

    113.Maryland Certificates of Survey, TI#1:36-37; Maryland Patents, BT&BY#3:137. Tracey plats, p. 1864, sheet 876 (at Carroll County Historical Society).

    114.Maryland Certificates of Survey, BY&GS#1:187; Maryland Patents, BY&GS#2:242.

    115.Maryland Certificates of Survey, TI#1:34; Maryland Patents, BT&BY#3:136.

    116.Prince George's County Rent Rolls, at MSA, 3:282.

    117.Ibid., 3:248.

    118.Debt Books, in Western Maryland Genealogy 8:27. Frederick County 1753 Debt Book, p. 50.

    119.Frederick County Land Records, B:306-308. No wife's dower release. Witnesses: Thomas Beatty and Nicholas Bundrick. Kiefauver is said to have immediately demolished an old blockhouse standing on the property, which was located about two miles southeast of the future village of Middletown, and to have erected a 30 by 33 foot log union (Lutheran and Reformed) church on the site. George Rhoderick, History of Middletown, p. 9; Grove, History of Carrollton Manor, p. 446.

    120.Frederick County Land Records, B:367.

    121.Frederick County Land Records, B:367-369. No wife's dower release. Witnesses: John Darnall and Mary Ballenger.

    122.Anson County Land Records.

    123.North Carolina Genealogical Society Journal 1: 12.

    124.North Carolina Land Patents, 2:79.

    125.Anson County Land Records.

    126.Original will, Craven County Wills, at NC Dept. of Archives and History, C.R.028.801.28.

    127.North Carolina Land Patents, 15:501. Robert Cannon was doubtless Caleb's uncle.

    128.North Carolina Land Patents, 20:390.
    129.North Carolina Land Patents, 22:12.

    130.Anson County Land Grant Surveys, #3487.

    131. North Carolina Land Patents, 26:48.

    132. Ibid., 26:106.

    133.North Carolina Genealogical Society Journal 10:45.

    134. Ibid., 9:114.

    135. Heads of Families, North Carolina, 1790, p. 166. Stephen Touchstone was listed on the same page. Caleb was not listed as head of a household in the North Carolina 1800 Census.

    136.Frederick County Land Records, B:97-99. Tract not located by Tracey.

    137.Ibid., B:367.

    138.Anson County Land Records.

    139.North Carolina Genealogical Society Journal 1:12.

    140.Anson County Land Records.

    141.Anson County Land Records.

    142.Charleston County Wills, 11:286.

    143. Henry C. Peden, Jr., Early Anglican Church Records of Cecil County (Westminster, MD: Family Line Publications, 1990),1). 66.

    144.Archives of Maryland, 61:563. Maryland Genealogical Society Bulletin 26:425.

    145.B. Carothers, 1783 Tax List of Maryland, pt. 1 (1977), p. 19.

    146.Maryland Chancery Papers, at MSA, case no. 5687. In some of the papers Sampson's name is given as Samuel.

    147.Maryland Testamentary Proceedings, 45 (1772-1774): 69.

    148.Maryland Inventories, 111:264. In March 1775, September 1775, and March 1776 his citation to submit the account of administration was renewed. [Maryland Testamentary Proceedings, 46 (1774-1775): 269; 47 (1775-1777): 71, 1131

    149.Carothers, op. cit., p. 33.

    150.Cecil County Inventories, at MSA, box 22, folder 33 (original document). Kinsmen Henry and Benjamin signed by marks "H" and "B" respectively. Benjamin and wife Esther Touchstone had two children.

    151.Maryland Revolutionary War Muster Rolls, Archives of Maryland, 18:252, 349, 558.

    152.Mary K. Meyer, Westward of Fort Cumberland (Finksburg, MD: Pipe Creek Publ., 1993), p. 53. The military lots were surveyed in 1788.

    153.Cecil County Inventories, at MSA, box 31, folder 65 (original document). Samuel Marquis and Rachel Touchstone were married 4 November 1784 by the Rev. John Evan Finley, minister of Fagg's Manor Presbyterian Church at Cochranville, Chester
    County, PA - [Rev. Finley's Memorandum Book, in Maryland Genealogical Society Bulletin 34:2921 Their marriage license was issued in Cecil County 30 October 1784 [Cecil County Marriage Licenses, 1777-1840, p. 35].

    154.Carothers, op. cit., p. 161.

    155.Medical Ledger of Dr. John Archer, 1779-1790, at Maryland Historical Society.

    156.Cecil County Inventories, at MSA, box 22, folder 33 (original document). Henry signed by mark "H".

    157.Harford County Criminal Court Dockets, 1778-1790, at MSA-.

    158.Cecil County Land Records, 25 (1804-1805): 459.

    Acknowledgements. The following Touchstone descendants contributed data. Marie Touchton of Nutley, New Jersey; and Mary Eleanor (Williams) Sandel, co-compiler of The Touchtones of Maryland, Virginia, North & South Carolina, Georgia, Mississippi, and Louisiana.
  • _UID: F60ECE12881F45A79FDA7EFC36C6E3044D68
  • Change Date: 6 JAN 2009 at 12:18



    Marriage 1 Christian b: 1660s
    • Married:
    • Change Date: 5 JAN 2009
    Children
    1. Has Children Richard TOUCHSTONE b: Abt 1694
    2. Has Children Mary TOUCHSTONE
    3. Has No Children Stephen TOUCHSTONE

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