EDMUNDSON & RELATED FAMILIES ALL BRANCHES, TWIGS AND LEAVES - REVISITED

Entries: 23484    Updated: 2014-10-28 23:43:04 UTC (Tue)    Contact: Virtus Edmundson

I have used the EDMUNDSON spelling of the family Surname for continuity only. There are some 20 or more versions of the spellings that I have found, sometimes 4 or 5 in one generation. Other versions are listed under alias.

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  • ID: I00823
  • Name: Robert PATTON
  • Sex: M
  • Birth: 1736 in Ulster, Northern Ireland
  • Death: 11 NOV 1832 in Gibson County, Tennessee
  • Burial: Old Bluff Cemetary (Now Plowed Over), Near Rutherford, Gibson County, Tennessee
  • Event: Tax List 1759 Rowan County, NC
  • Census: 1800 Pg 782, Ln 13, Morgan Dist, Birke Co., NC & Ashville Twn, Buncombe Co., NC
  • Census: 1790 Pg 96, 6th Company, Burke Co., NC
  • Census: 1810 Buncombe County, North Carolina
  • Census: 1830 Buncombe County, North Carolina
  • Occupation: Farmer
  • Note:
    Robert Patton was the father of Margaret Patton, who married Abner Burgin and is the mother of my great-great grandmother Matilda Burgin Edmundson on my fathers side of the family. He is also the father of Elizabeth "Betsy" Patton Crockett the 2nd wife of David Stern "Davey" Crockett, hunter, explorer, soldier, member of the Tennessee State Legislature, the United States Congress, and one of the heros of the battle at the Alamo in the war of independance of Texas from Mexico. Robert, in his own right, was a distinguished North Carolina and West Tennessee pioneer and a Revolutionary War figure of note. He was born about 1736 in Ulster, Northern Ireland of Scots-Irish parents. He came to America about 1755 with his father John and brother Elijah. Family historians say that they landed at Charleston, South Carolina and migrated overland to Rowan County, North Carolina. Robert met Rebecca in about 1780 and they were married in Rowan County. Between 1790 and 1800 Robert and his his family and migarted 100 miles further west and settled in the valley of the Swannanoa River near what is now Asheville, Buncombe County, North Carolina. Robert and Rebecca lived happily in the shadow of Black Mountain raising crops, cattle and a family of 5 daughters and 2 sons. Two of their daughters Sarah and Rebecca married William and James Edmundson, brothers to great-great-great grandfather John Edmundson. When Rebecca died in about 1828, she was laid to rest in The Old Patton Cemetary in an unmarked grave on a grassy slope about a mile north of Swannanoa, Robert had given the land for the cemetary, which was said to be the first cemetary for white people west of the Blue Ridge Mountains. He also donated the land for the site of the hewn-log Presbyterian Church that once stood by the cementary. It is believed to be the first church structure raised west of the Blue Ridge Mountains short of the Catholic Missions in the West.

    REVOLUTIONARY WAR: When the Revolutionary War broke out, Robert and his neighbors, mostly Scots-Irish like himself, almost by reflex sympathized with the Patriot cause. A century or two earlier, the English had foricbly transported their protestant ancestors (mostly Presbyterian) from Scotland to Northern Ireland to colonize there and hold in check the Irish Catholics. Intermarriage with the Irish and harsh English tarriffs that crippled Irish trade with England made the transplanted Scots as anti-English as the Irish themselves. During the fall of 1780, Loyalist (Tory) Forces commanded by British Lieutenant Colonel Patrick Ferguson invaded Western North Carolina to subdue the settlements considered to be sympathetic to the Patriot cause and forage for cattle and supplies for Lord Cornwallis's British Army. From his headquarters in Gilbert Town in Rutherford County, NC he sent a dispatch to the "Officers of the Western Waters" (West of the Blue Ridge) that if they did not desist from their opposition to the British Army and take protection under his standard, he would march his army over the mountains, hang their leaders and lay their country to waste with fire and sword. To this end he planned a raid into the Catawba Valley to obtain beef cattle there. When he heard of this Colonel McDowell held a meeting with the leaders of the Upper Catawba Valley and suggested that in view of the present emergency they should take the ruse of seeking the protection of the Crown to ensure that the cattle they so desperatly needed for the future would not wind up as provisions for Colonel Furgeson and his Tory troops. Daniel Smith (Later Colonel), Captains Thomas Lytle, Thomas Hemphill, Robert Patton, and John McDowell (Hunting John McDowell) of Plesant Gardens, absolutely refused this course of action and gathered all the cattle they could and drove them deep into the coves of Black Mountain. Some others did employ the ruse, thus saving the rest of the cattle. Colonel Ferguson did as expected and penetrated into the heart of Burke County as far as Davidson's Old Fort in the West and North as far as the Old Edmundson place on Buck Creek. He retreated to Gilbert Town without the cattle but the encursion alarmed all the whole frontier. Men like Shelby (Washington County, NC) Sevier (Sullivan County, NC) McDowell (Burke & Rutherford Counties, NC) Cleveland (Wilkes & Surry Counties, NC) and Campbell (Washington County, VA) gathered volunteer militamen all seasoned frontiermen and experienced indian fighters armed with their long barreled rifles to rid the frontier of Ferguson's menace once and all. When these forces passed Robert's farm he repaired their wagons and supplied them with more wagons and supplies for which he was given a promissary note to be redeamed at wars end. (NOTE: Robert is listed in the DAR Patriot's Index - Centenial Edition - Part 3, Page 2247; Patton, Robert b 1736-42 d 11-11-1832 TN m Rebecca -------- sol NC.) The Patriot forces met the Loyalists at Kings Mountain on October 7, 1780 and either killed or captured all of them. Colonel Ferguson was killed during the battle. His defeat at Kings Mountain along with the earlier defeat at Cowpens in South Carolina spelled doom for the British plan to conquer the Southern Colonies and forced Lord Cornwallis's army to have to retreat, harried all the way, through North Carolina and Virginia. A year later at Yorktown, Virginia, Cornwallis surrendered to American and French Forces under General George Washington. After peace was signed, Robert took his promisary note to the North Carolina authorities and was granted a 1000 acre tract of land on the Rutherford Fork of the Obion River in Western North Carolina which became Gibson and Weakley Counties in West Tennessee.

    ROBERT PATTON GRANT OF LAND BY STATE OF NORTH CAROLONA -WESTERN DISTRICT (LATER TENNESSEE) "By virtue of a Warrant from the State Of North Carolina, entry #1569, dated 1st of April, 1784, which was located on land previously entered - surveyed for Robert Patton 1000 acres of land on Rutherford's Fork of the Obion River, begining at the two Black Gum trees and a Sweet Gum tree, marked F R on John Tate's land, runs South to David Jens corner, West 125 chains on Blount Line, with his line North 80 Chains to a stake---Surveyed September 29, 1785"

    John Tate W. Rutherford
    &
    Amos Moore

    On reverse side of Land Warrant

    " Name - Robert Patton - 1000 acres. Entered 1 April 1784. Book 67 NC Land Grants, Page 304. Location:
    Rutherford's Fork of Obion River. Grant #63 dated July 10, 1788"

    WEST TENNESSEE: After his wife Rebecca died, Robert, despite his 90+ years in age, rode horseback over rough mountain and valley trails to join the Crockett-Patton clan on his land grant in Western Tennessee. Upon arrival he immediately purchase some 1200 acres of land for distribution to his children and grandchildren. As he had in North Carolina, he donated land for a Presbyterian Church with an adjacent Cemetary on a bluff overlooking the Rutherford Fork of the Obion River. The cemetary was the only one in the area for many years. Coffins were brought in by boat before roads were built and many of the earliest pioneers were buried there in unmarked graves. it being to difficult to bring in stone for markers. Great-great grandfather Michael Isreal Edmundson and great-great grandmother Matilda Burgin Edmundson were said to have been married in the Church there. Robert died 11 November 1832 and was the first person said to have been buried in the cemetary know known as the Old Bluff Cemetary (Now Plowed Over).

    SOURCE: (1) Ancestors Discovered, The Edmundsons, Tinkles, Wades, Wards, Pattons and Some Others, Charles Edmundson, Memphis, 1981 Unpublished (2) Robert Patton and his Descendents, Lillian Byrd Thomas, Ashville NC, 1961 Privately Published. (3) King's Mountain and It's Heros, Lyman C. Draper, Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., Baltimore, 1974

    CENSUS:
    1759 Rowan County Tax Lists - Robert Patton, Elijah Patton
    1790 Census Burke County, NC - 1 WM over 16, 1 WM under 16, 3 WF all ages.
    1800 Census Asheville Town, Buncombe County, NC - 1 WM (10-16) 1WM (16-26) 1WM (45+) 4WF (0-10) 1WF (16-26) 1WF (45+) 7 Slaves Robert was also listed on Pg 782, Ln 13, Morgan Dist, Burke Co., NC 1800 Census with similar figures.
    1810 Census, Buncombe County, NC - 1WM (16-26) 1WM (45+) 1WF (16-26) 1WF (45+) figure for slaves not readable.
    1820 Census, Buncombe County, NC - 1 WM (45+) 1WF (45+)
    1830 Census, Buncombe County, NC - 1 WM (45+)




    Father: John PATTON b: 1720 in Ulster, Northern Ireland
    Mother: UNKNOWN b: UNKNOWN in Ulster, Northern Ireland

    Marriage 1 Rebecca CATHEY b: 1766 in North Carolina
    • Married: 1780 in Burke County, North Carolina
    • Marriage Ending Status: Death of one spouse
    Children
    1. Has Children James PATTON b: 1782 in Burke County, North Carolina
    2. Has Children Sarah PATTON b: 1780 in Rowan County, North Carolina
    3. Has Children Anne Catherine PATTON b: 1783 in Burke County, North Carolina
    4. Has Children George PATTON b: 20 SEP 1786 in Burke County, North Carolina
    5. Has Children Elizabeth PATTON b: 22 MAY 1788 in Swannanoa, Buncombe County, North Carolina
    6. Has Children Matilda Caroline PATTON b: BET 1780 AND 1790 in Burke County, North Carolina
    7. Has Children Margaret PATTON b: 1794 in Swannanoa, Buncombe County, North Carolina
    8. Has Children Rebecca PATTON b: BET 1790 AND 1800 in Buncombe County, North Carolina

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    This is a work in progress. With the records available to me, I have tried to make all my work as correct as possible. However, mistakes can be made. Use this only as a guide for you own research.

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