Cutlips in America
(2012 Edition)

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  • ID: I17775
  • Name: Scott Munson Cutlip
  • _AKA: SS# 232-05-5833
  • Sex: M
  • Birth: 15 Jul 1915 in Buckhannon, Upshur Co., West Virginia
  • Death: 18 Aug 2000 in Madison, Dane Co., Wisconsin
  • Note:

    SCOTT MUNSON CUTLIP (1915-2000)



    ====================

    BIOGRAPHY: Scott Munson Cutlip Obituary - Published August 24, 2000

    MADISON/ATHENS, GEORGIA -- Scott Munson Cutlip, age 85, of Madison, Wisconsin, died on Friday, August 18, 2000, after a brief fight with cancer.

    He was born on July 15, 1915, in Buckhannon, West Virginia, the only child of Janet Munson and Okey Scott Cutlip. He was raised by his uncle, George Carper Reger. Scott was a reporter for the Buckhannon Record in 1933, and reporter and weekly editor with the West Virginia Newspaper Publishing Co., Morgantown, West Virginia, from 1935 until 1938. He graduated from Syracuse University in 1939 with a B.A. in journalism and political science. He received a masters of philosophy degree in journalism and political science from the University of Wisconsin in 1941.

    After serving as public relations director for the West Virginia State Road Commission he enlisted in the United States Army Air Force in 1942. First assigned to public information, and later counter-intelligence, he advanced from the rank of private to major in three years. He served in World War II with the 5th Air Force from Australia through the occupation of Japan.

    When he returned from overseas, Scott introduced the study of public relations at the University of Wisconsin in 1946, and taught that subject and news editing at the UW from then until 1974. He also served the UW on the president's staff in 1947 until 1949. He served as an advisor to the United States Army and other Armed Services graduate students, and guided more than 130 of them in their master's theses.

    Throughout his career as a professor and administrator, Scott contributed widely to the life of his universities, raising funds and working on numerous faculty committees. He was a forceful proponent of faculty governance. In 1975, he went to the University of Georgia school (now college) of journalism and mass communication, in Athens. He was appointed dean of the school in 1976, and served as dean until 1983, when he became a university professor until his retirement in 1985.

    He is the author (with Allen Center and Glen Broom) of Effective Public Relations, the basic textbook and all-time best seller in the field; the first edition was published in 1952, and the eighth in 2000. The book is also published in several foreign languages. Scott was also the author of The Unseen Power: Public Relations. A History; Fund Raising in the United States: Its Role in America's Philanthropy; and Public Relations History from 17th to 20th Century. The Antecedents. He compiled A Public Relations Bibliography. He was the author of numerous other articles, papers and book reviews, contributed chapters to other books, and was a consultant to several corporations, and public and private institutions.

    During and after his career he devoted many hours and much energy to the State Historical Society of Wisconsin, in Madison. He was a member of the board of curators from 1958 until 1975, and served as president of the Society from 1964 until 1967. Among other major projects, he helped found the Society's Mass Communications History Center.

    Among his awards and citations are the Paul J. Deutschmann Award for Excellence in Research, the Association for Journalism Education and Mass Communication, 1991; the Gold Anvil Award, the Public Relations Society of American, 1995; the International Association of Business Communicators 25th Anniversary Award, 1995; the Department of the Army Commander's Award for Public Service, 1984; inducted into the Arthur W. Paige Society Hall of Fame, 1987; and inducted into the Public Relations Society of America College of Fellows, 1990. He was additionally honored with the named Scott M. Cutlip Award for Professional Distinction as a Fund Raising Executive, presented by the Wisconsin Chapter of the National Society of Fund Raising Executives; and with the named Scott M. Cutlip Chapter of the Public Relations Student Society of America, University of Wisconsin. He received an honorary Litt. D. from West Virginia Wesleyan College, 1971.

    Scott lectured, conducted workshops and seminars, consulted and did research in Canada, Mexico, Ecuador, Peru, Brazil, England, Wales, the Netherlands, Norway, Puerto Rico, Sweden, Finland, Italy, Greece, India, Venezuela and Japan. Scott was a member of the State Historical Society of Wisconsin; the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication; Public Relations Society of America; APR (Accredited in Public Relations); and the Madison Literary Society. He was a life member of the University of Wisconsin Memorial Union.

    He was preceded in death in 1997 by his adored wife of 50 years, Erna, of Wauwatosa, Wisconsin. He is survived by several cousins; and his loving son, George, and beloved daughter-in-law, Nancy, both of Madison. He will be remembered by many friends and former students around the world.

    A memorial service will be held at 2:00 p.m., followed by a reception until 5:00 p.m., on Tuesday, September 5, 2000, at BLACKHAWK COUNTRY CLUB in Madison (Shorewood Hills). In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Wisconsin History Foundation, Scott M. Cutlip Endowment, 816 State St., Madison, WI 53706.

    Cress Funeral Service (608) 238-3434. -- Published August 24, 2000 in Madison [WI] Capital Times and Wisconsin State Journal, and the Athens [GA] Banner-Herald.

    ====================

    TRIBUTE TO SCOTT M. CUTLIP

    On behalf of the Public Relations Society of America, I wish to express our collective sadness at the passing of Scott M. Cutlip, APR, Fellow PRSA. I also want to acknowledge our eternal gratitude to Professor Cutlip for his life-long efforts to establish public relations as a legitimate field of academic study and to enhance the profession overall. He was a pioneer and one of the most influential figures in public relations education.

    Effective Public Relations, co-authored initially with Allen H. Center and later also with Glen Broom, has for decades been a touchstone for public relations study. The book became so integral to public relations courses over the years that students often referred to it as the "bible of public relations" rather than by its official name. The book today serves as the core textbook for PRSA's accreditation exam.

    Professor Cutlip was the first recipient of PRSA's Outstanding Educator Award in 1970. In 1995 he was received the Gold Anvil Award, the Society's highest individual honor, presented to someone who has made a major contribution to the public relations profession through a distinguished career.

    Scott Cutlip distinguished himself throughout his career, first as a journalism student at Wesleyan College and Syracuse University, then as a newspaper reporter and editor, as a teacher at the University of Wisconsin at Madison and dean emeritus at the University of Georgia's School of Journalism and Mass Communication, as an author and public relations historian, and as a member of PRSA.

    The PRSA family will miss his presence, but takes comfort in knowing that his wisdom and writings will continue to benefit public relations students and professionals.

    Stephen D. Pisinski, APR, Fellow PRSA
    2000 PRSA Chair and CEO

    Note: Contributions in his memory may be made to the Scott M. Cutlip Scholarship Fund, School of Journalism and Mass Communication, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706.

    ===================

    News & Views

    Remembering Scott M. Cutlip, APR, Fellow PRSA


    Scott M. Cutlip, APR, Fellow PRSA, died last Aug. 18 after a short battle with cancer. He was 85. Cutlip introduced the study of public relations at the University of Wisconsin in 1946, and taught that subject and news editing there until 1974. In 1975, he went to the University of Georgia school (now college) of journalism and mass communication. He was appointed dean of the school in 1976, and served as dean until 1983, when he became a university professor until his retirement in 1985. He is the author (with Allen Center, APR, Fellow PRSA, and Glen Broom) of "Effective Public Relations," the introductory textbook and all-time best-seller in the field; the first edition was published in 1952, and the eighth in 2000. Tactics collected comments from some of the many PR professionals who knew Cutlip.

    Bill Adams, APR, Fellow PRSA, Associate Professor, Florida International University

    In my mind, Scott was the link between the early days of public relations and the beginnings of a true profession. In the classroom, he referred to the field as a "calling," much as one would the priesthood. He watched his graduates advance in their careers and if he thought you'd committed transgressions against "the calling," he'd let you know. Conversely, if he thought you were helping advance the profession, you'd hear about that, as well. With Scott, there was seldom a middle ground -- you always knew where you stood and his mentoring was priceless. It's definitely the end of an era.

    Betsy Plank, APR, Fellow PRSA, Betsy Plank Public Relations, Chicago

    He was a legend in PR education and a highly respected authority in the profession. He was tough, demanding, often feisty, and with absolutely no tolerance for shoddy, stupid or unethical practice. He inspired many of us in the practice to champion pubic relations education and its students. For me, that is his most enduring legacy.

    James E. Grunig, Professor, Department of Communication, University of Maryland

    Scott Cutlip was the founder of modern PR education. At the University of Wisconsin, Cutlip established public relations as more than one course tacked onto a journalism curriculum. His book, "Effective Public Relations," framed public relations as a management discipline supported by a research-based body of knowledge. He was my teacher at Wisconsin in 1966, and I have tried to carry on these two contributions ever since.

    Pat Jackson, APR, Fellow PRSA, Senior Counsel, Jackson Jackson & Wagner, Exeter, N.H.

    Scott Cutlip is one of the strongest influences on the ascent of public relations as an instrument of enlightened management and social betterment. In his crusty, take-no-prisoners style, he continually prodded the field toward higher standards -- willing to put himself on the line to push public relations towards professionalism by pointing out succinctly where it needed to change and grow in order to achieve that recognition.

    Melvin L. Sharpe, APR, Fellow PRSA, Professor and Coordinator, Public Relations Department of Journalism, Ball State University

    Scott Cutlip, as a pioneer PR educator, has had a major impact on PR education and on the profession. His leadership as lead author in writing what would become the "bible" of PR education for many years has shaped present-day PR education. Because his pioneer work has also served as the primary study guide for professional accreditation, Cutlip's influence can be especially seen in the way professionals look at the historical development of public relations and its performance as a four-step process. Scott Cutlip was a commanding figure of a man who left a mark on a profession that can only be described as colossal.

    Donald K. Wright, APR, Fellow PRSA, Professor of Communication, University of South Alabama (Colleague of Cutlip's at the University of Georgia, 1977-1983)

    Scott inspired many to do better, insisted that public relations be used to make society better, and had no patience with the lazy or the incompetent. Without question, a truly colorful character who lived life hard, and enjoyed it.

    Judy Van Slyke Turk, APR, Fellow PRSA, Dean, College of Communication and Media Sciences at Zayed University in Dubai, United Arab Emirates.

    While Scott may be remembered most widely for his comprehensive introductory PR textbook, my most vivid memoir is of Scott the mentor. I'd heard of Scott, of course, when I began teaching in 1979 at Syracuse University where we used his textbook, but I didn't meet him until several years later, at a convention of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communications. He was there with his "Georgia mafia," a collection of (then) young PR faculty who were like the moons in Scott's sun orbit. I remember sitting in on several late-night conversations between Scott and his young proteges, and it was very clear that he cared about them as individuals and as young scholars and teachers under his tutelage. Many of the best-known PR scholars and teachers today benefitted from Scott's mentoring and I'd say that's about as impressive a legacy as any of us could ever hope to leave.

    Kathleen S. Kelly, APR, Fellow PRSA, Professor and Coordinator, Public Relations Degree Program, University of Louisiana at Lafayette

    Scott was a mentor to many new scholars, including some like me who came under his wing toward the end of his career. Although caring, his expectations were demanding. In the early 1990s, for example, when I told him I was going to write a complaint letter to the editor of a journal that had published what I thought was an unsatisfactory review of my first book, Scott's advice was swift and unsympathetic: "Forget it; get on with writing the next book." I did, and he was right. Public relations needs to move forward in building its body of knowledge; it cannot afford academics who rest on past achievements. And Scott led by example, writing two seminal books on public relations history in the last decade of his life. Even as he approached death, he set a standard for all to emulate. He ended our last telephone conversation by saying, "Tell everyone I'm going out with no heroics and no regrets -- I've had a great life. And give them my love."

    ====================

    USA Today, Aug 20, 2000: Scott M. Cutlip, Professor:

    Scott M. Cutlip, 85, whom the trade newspaper PR Week named one of the 20th century's 10 most influential figures in public relations, describing him as the "sire of public relations education," died August 18 in Madison, Wis. The cause of death was not disclosed.

    Mr. Cutlip, who has been credited with helping to establish public relations as a legitimate field of academic study, was co-author of the 1952 book "Effective Public Relations," which became one of the field's best-selling texts. His 1994 book, "The Unseen Power," was a history of U.S. public relations.

    He taught at the University of Wisconsin from 1946 until 1975. He then joined the University of Georgia's School of Journalism and Mass Communication, where he was dean from 1976 to 1983 and from which he retired in 1985.

    ====================

    Headline: Cutlip taught journalism at UW-Madison
    Publication Date: August 20, 2000
    Source: The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
    Page: 055B
    Subjects:
    Region: North America; Midwest United States; Wisconsin
    Obituary: Cutlip taught journalism at UW-Madison, wrote key textbook for public relations
    By MARIE ROHDE
    of the Journal Sentinel staff
    Sunday, August 20, 2000

    Scott M. Cutlip, a journalism professor and author who was considered "the sire of public relations education," died Friday after a brief bout with cancer. He was 85.

    Cutlip taught at the University of Wisconsin-Madison from 1946 until 1975, when he joined the faculty of the University of Georgia School of Journalism and Mass Communications. He served as dean of the school from 1976 until 1983, returning to teaching for two years before retiring. He returned to Madison as a full-time resident in 1995 after his wife, Erna, died.

    Born in West Virginia, Cutlip's first job was running the folding machine for the Buckhannon Record during the Depression. He later worked as a reporter and editor. He studied journalism at Wesleyan College in West Virgina before transferring to Syracuse University, where he earned a degree in journalism and political science in 1939. He received a master's degree from UW-Madison in 1941.

    He enlisted in the Air Force in 1941 and rose to the rank of major within three years. He served until 1946 working in counterintelligence.

    Cutlip co-authored a book with Allen J. Center in 1952 that is still considered the major textbook in public relations education, said Robert Taylor, who worked with Cutlip at UW-Madison for many years. The book, "Effective Public Relations," has been translated into Italian, Spanish and Japanese and there are bootleg copies of the text in China and Germany, said Cutlip's son, George Cutlip. Cutlip went on to write two other books.

    Cutlip won many awards, including the Golden Anvil, the top award granted by the Public Relations Association of America, and the Paul Deutschmann Award, given only 11 times since 1964 by the Association for Journalism and Mass Communication Education. PR Week, the industry newspaper, named Cutlip to the top 10 of the 20th century's 100 most influential figures in the field.

    Taylor said his friend considered news editing the most important course offered in the school of journalism. It was a rigorous course that emphasized accuracy, speed and clear writing.

    "Newspaper editors around the country knew that if students could survive that course, they were ready for the newsroom," said George Cutlip.

    Plans for a memorial service are pending.

    ====================

    Wednesday, August 23, 2000

    WRITER/CONTACT: Larry B. Dendy, (706) 542-8078

    SCOTT CUTLIP, FORMER DEAN OF JOURNALISM AND MASS COMMUNICATION AT UGA, DIES IN WISCONSIN

    ATHENS, Ga. -- Scott M. Cutlip, a pioneer in public relations education who served as dean of the University of Georgia?s Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communication from 1976 to 1983, died Aug. 18 in Madison, Wis. Cutlip, who was 85, was diagnosed with cancer several months ago.

    Cutlip was co-author of one of the best-selling public relations textbooks in history and is credited with helping establish public relations as a field of academic study. A leading trade journal last year named him one of the most influential figures in public relations in the 20th century.

    Cutlip came to the Grady College as a visiting professor in January of 1975 and became acting dean of the college in June of that year. He was named dean in October of the following year. After stepping down as dean in 1983, he served as a University Professor and professor of public relations until his retirement in 1985. He had lived in Madison for the past several years.

    Before coming to UGA, Cutlip spent 29 years on the faculty of the University of Wisconsin School of Journalism and Mass Communication, where he introduced the study of public relations.

    He was co-author with Allen H. Center of the 1952 book "Effective Public Relations," which has been published in seven editions and is one of the best-selling texts in the field. His 1994 book, "The Unseen Power," is the first detailed history of the public relations profession in America from its beginnings in 1900 through the 1960s.

    Last year, PR Week, an industry newspaper, cited Cutlip as the person who gave legitimacy to public relations education through strong research and scholarship, and creation of a teaching model for future generations of educators. Listing him among the 20th century?s 10 most influential figures in the field, the paper credits Cutlip with "structur(ing) the model of university-based public relations education for decades to come, which included an emphasis on ethics and research."

    Funeral services will be held in Madison.

    ====================

  • Change Date: 5 Oct 2011 at 04:45:29



    Father: Okey Scott Cutlip b: 18 Aug 1891 in Braxton Co., West Virginia
    Mother: Janet Munson b: AFT 1891

    Marriage 1 Erna K. Flader b: 27 Oct 1906 in Wauwatosa, Milwaukee Co., Wisconsin
    • Married: 21 May 1947
    Children
    1. Has No Children George Cutlip b: AFT 1947

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