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  • ID: I447
  • Name: Nathan Boone
  • Prefix: Colonel
  • Sex: M
  • Birth: 2 MAR 1781 in Boones Station, Fayette Co., Kentucky
  • Death: 16 OCT 1856 in Ash Grove, Greene Co., Missouri
  • Burial: Boone Family Cemetery, Greene Co., Missouri
  • Occupation: Lt. Col., U.S. Army Retired
  • ALIA: Nathaniel
  • Note: 1

    b: 2 MAR 1781 in Boone's Station, now Cross Plains, Fayette Co., Kentucky [this was at that time a part of the Commonwealth of Virginia]
    Daniel Boone died at the residence of his (youngest) son, Col. Nathan Boone, which was an old-style two-story house, the first of the kind erected west of the Missouri River, and it is yet standing. A good wood cut of it can be found in "Switzler' s History of Missouri", page 180. Nathan Boone was commissioned in the war of 1812 (Captain).
    Nathan Boone, the youngest of Daniel's sons, played a vital role in American Pioneering, following in much the same steps as his famous father.
    Boone's early activities included life as a hunter, trapper, and surveyor, as well as his leadership of a company of rangers during the War of 1812. After the war, Boone returned to survey work. In 1831, he organized another company of rangers f or the Black Hawk War and returned to military life, making it his career.

    Nathan Boone was the youngest child of Daniel Boone, the pioneer of the Kentucky frontier. In 1796, Nathan with his family moved to what is now the state of Missouri. During the War of 1812 he was a captain of a company of Missouri volunteers. I n 1820, Nathan was elected as a delegate to the state constitutional convention. After his service to the state, he accepted a commission as a captain in the lst Regiment U.S. Dragoons. After entrance into the army, he spent much of his time on th e border and in Indian Territory of that period. He retired as a lieutenant colonel after spending twenty years of service in the army. He died in 1856 on his farm in Missouri.
    Sent to Santa Fe as representative of the U.S. Government at the close of the Mexican War. Served as Military Governor of Santa Fe.
    Listed as one of the contributors of Carlton College, Springfield, Missouri founded in 1848.

    The Nathan Boone Homestead State Historic Site
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------


    The Nathan Boone Homestead is the seventy-seventh and newest unit of the Missouri State Park system. Acquired in August 1991 subject to a three-year continued, use provision, it is expected to be opened to the public in 1995.

    This essay, printed with the permission of the University of Missouri Press, will appear in a book to be published this fall in conjunction with the 75th anniversary of the system. Titled Exploring Missouri's Legacy: State Parks and Historic Sites , the book is edited by Susan Flader and co-authored with R. Roger Pryor, John A. Karel, and Charles Callison. It also features more than two hundred full-color images by Oliver Schuchard and others representing every park in the system.

    He came to the prairie not so much by pleasurable design as by necessity, probably more driven than drawn. Colonel Nathan Boone, soldier, surveyor, explorer, son of the famed Daniel, was broke and starting over again at the age of 57. This was hi s second experience of this sort, having been uprooted from a Kentucky home as a young man when he and a sixteen year old bride followed his land-bereft father into Missouri at the turn of the nineteenth century. In fact, it is a sad historical ir ony that the Boones--several generations of them--probably blazed more new trails, discovered more new caves, springs and mountains, and walked over more unclaimed land than any other single family in American history, and wound up with very littl e of it for their trouble.

    Colonel Daniel Boone, the storied frontiersman, hunter, and Indian fighter, and his enterprising sons left indelible marks on the history and geography of Missouri. Such places and place-names as Boonville, Boonsboro, Boone County, the Boone's Lic k Trail and the Boone's Lick Country mark their enterprises and explorations. And, prominent among the family' s cultural legacies, is this frontier homestead and log house near the town of Ash Grove, northwest of Springfield, which was home to Na than and his family for the last nineteen years of his strenuous life. Although never the subject of tall tales and sometimes fanciful biographies like his illustrious father, this son of Daniel Boone rivaled his father's contributions to the deve lopment of theAmerican frontier -- particularly with respect to Missouri.

    Daniel Morgan, the seventh child and third son, and Nathan, the tenth and youngest, helped their parents move to Missouri in 1799 after Daniel the elder had lost his holdings in what is now West Virginia in a land-title dispute. The Boones had bee n drawn to Missouri by the promise of grants of land from the Spanish authorities. Daniel was given land in the beautiful Femme Osage Valley, and his sons and other relations secured neighboring grants.

    The elder Boone's land difficulties surfaced one last time late in his life when the land commission for the newly created Territory of Missouri refused to confirm his claim to the 1,000 arpents of land given him by the Spanish authorities. It too k an act of Congress in 1814 to give Daniel title to his land as an honorarium for the "arduous and useful services" rendered to his country. Unfortunately the good news about the land and his creditors from earlier land problems in Kentucky arriv ed almost simultaneously, and after the sale of his newly patented land he was left virtually penniless at the age of 80.

    Thus it was that he lived with one or another of his children, moving in with Nathan in 1820 on completion of Nathan's imposing two-story stone house on a hill overlooking the Femme Osage and his Spanish grant lands. It was in this new house tha t his famous father died later the same year, a circumstance that led it later to be called the "Daniel Boone Home." This beautiful house still stands and is operated by a private owner as a tourist attraction. (Efforts by the state to acquire i t for a state historic site have repeatedly been rebuffed [note: Home Site purchased by Lindenwood University in 1998 -- see: http://www.lindenwood.edu/boone/ -- ccs]

    Long before building his new home, Nathan had manufactured salt with his brother, Daniel Morgan, at the salt springs in the central Missouri region that bears their name (now Boone's Lick State Historic Site). When Indian attacks on American settl ements were stirred up by British agents in the War of 1812, both Daniel M. and Nathan served as captains of companies of rangers formed by the U.S. Army to repel the attackers. Nathan's company was disbanded in 1815 and, until his return to milit ary service in 1832, he prospered in civilian life in St. Charles County, serving as a delegate to the constitutional convention held in St. Louis in 1820.

    When the Fox and Sac Indians behind Chief Black Hawk took arms against a federal order to leave their lands in northern Illinois and Wisconsin, Nathan once again answered the call. He was at this time in midlife, 51 years of age. For the next twen ty years, Nathan's militaryservice was almost continuous, punctuated by occasional furloughs or leaves of absence. He was sent to Fort Gibson in Arkansas on recruiting service, and in 1834 joined the Pawnee expedition. It was probably during thi s period that he passed through and made note of the ash grove on the rolling Springfield plateau where he would one day move his family. Later he was stationed at Des Moines, Iowa, and led his dragoons on a campaign into Sioux territory.

    [20]

    It was during one of his furloughs from military service that he had to make an adjustment in what must have seemed to be a recurrent family nightmare. In 1837 Nathan had to sell his beautiful home and all of his lands in St. Charles County to ret ire a debt he had acquired as bondsman for a friend who turned out to be less than trustworthy. The friend, a county official, had absconded with the county funds.

    Nathan, then 57, turned his eyes to the prairies of southwest Missouri, where some of his sons may already have filed on part of the property that became Nathan's last home. The financial disaster in St. Charles County no doubt precipitated the mo ve to the less grand accommodations of a log home on cheap prairie land. These prairies had remained largely unsettled by pioneers until a fairly late date owing to the common perception that a lack of trees indicated lesser fertility. The difficu lty of turning heavy prairie sod also made these lands less attractive until the availability of the steel plow invented by John Deere in 1838.

    The site of this new Boone home was on rolling prairie in a shallow swale formed by a tributary of Clear Creek, which itself runs west to the Sac River only a mile and a half away. This landscape probably looks today much as it did when Nathan fir st saw it, but with modem pasture grasses replacing the native prairie flora of those days. There are a few patches of trees along the creek and a few more marking the position of the several springs on the property and the family burial plot. On e is struck by the fact that the house sits very gently on the land, small in scale, and emphasizing the horizontal rather than the vertical as the landscape itself seems to do. The house is sited as good pioneer houses tended to be, so that it i s tucked under the brow of the low rise to the northwest,somewhat protected from the brunt of winter weather.
    The house is comfortable, but not very large. (One wonders if there was lingering bitterness in the family's ongoing remembrance of their stone mansion in the Femme Osage country.) Architectural historians would call this a double-pen log cabin. T hat is, the rooms are two log "boxes" separated by a center hallway or "dog trot," the whole covered by one roof. The passageway may have had open ends like a breezeway for some period after the house was constructed, but it is enclosed now. Ther e is a chimney and a fireplace at each end serving each of the two rooms. The facade of the house facing the hillside is plain, but the side facing to the southeast, toward the creek and down the valley, has a veranda. This veranda or porch is o f the variety that seems to be subtracted from the mass of the house and is thus under the main roof, rather than tacked on.

    The house was originally sided with hand-riven walnut clapboards, and these survive intact on the protected wall under the veranda roof. These clapboards remind us once again of the care and importance that in past times was accorded small details , since each is beaded at its bottom edge. That is, a molding plane was applied by hand to every board individually so that its edge is finished with a rounded groove. Some of this siding may yet survive on the other side of the house also, but i t presently sports two -- possibly three -- complete layers of siding and architectural surgery will be required to determine if original material is buried under these modem repairs.

    Occasionally a historic site provides a small grace note that reduces "HISTORY" to a more familiar scale. The Boone house gives us such a moment when we notice one of the clapboards under the veranda displays "A, B, C..." cut with a knife in styl e both antique and childlike. The alphabet is not complete, and we are left to wonder whether the child didn't know all of the letters, or whether we are seeing a moment of parental discovery and angst, frozen in time. In any case this small bit o f graffiti reminds us that the Boones-- suspended somewhere between myth and legend -- were really people too.

    The interior of the house is simply two large rooms, each some 17 feet square, and a hallway between. The degree of survival of the historic fabric on the interior is stunning as you realize the original fireplace mantles, doors, and woodwork tri m are in place, and all demonstrate the care and precision of handmade work. The trim boards are beaded, all of the doors are made of planks with "Z" braces, and in one comer of the hallway a winding stair leads to a large one-half story loft abov e.

    This space is essentially one large room, perhaps a sleeping loft, except for one small chamber at the head of the stairs. The purpose of this little room, perhaps eight feet square, is uncertain, but its construction is interesting. Its walls ar e built entirely of hand-cut walnut boards, and even in the gloomy light of this attic space you need only run your fingers over the surface to feel rather than see the shallow hills and valleys that proclaim that the entire wall has been painstak ingly shaped by hand with a smoothing plane.

    Nathan was able to enjoy his new home on the prairie only at sporadic intervals between his army assignments. Soon he was headquartered for several years at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, and later at Fort Gibson. From Fort Gibson he led three companie s of dragoons on a 79-day horseback reconnaissance over the western prairies and up the Arkansas River to provide protection for traders using the Santa Fe Trail. He was 63 years old. After a furlough, he rejoined his company in 1845 and set up ca mp at Evansville on the Arkansas line, assigned "to preserve the peace among the Cherokee," who recently had been herded by the army from homelands in Georgia to Indian territory in Oklahoma.

    Back at Fort Leavenworth and by now a major, Nathan took sick leave September 9, 1848, and returned to his home at Ash Grove. After years of rugged army life on the frontier, the old soldier's health was failing. Still on sick leave, he was promot ed in 1850 by grateful superiors to Lt. Colonel, Second Dragoons, but three years later he resigned from the army at age 72.

    He had only three more years to live on this final homestead, and following his death in 1856 he was buried a few hundred yards north of his home.Later his wife Olive, the once-sixteen-year-old bride joined him. There they still lie, amidst thei r children and grandchildren.

    [22]

    The luck of the Boones with land had never run smoothly and even this last homestead left the Boone family 41 years later when it was sold at auction at the courthouse door in Springfield in 1897 to cover the indebtedness of one of Nathan's grandc hildren. Perhaps fate finally smiled when on August 15, 1991, the Missouri Department of Natural Resources took title to over 300 acres of the original Nathan Boone farm. One feels an inner satisfaction in knowing that there will be a Boone homest ead on the map forever, as if the grateful citizens of their adopted state are holding in trust for this illustrious pioneer family the land that eluded them in their own lifetimes.

    Exploring Missouri's Legacy.' State Parks and Historic Sites will be available from local bookstores or directly from the University of Missouri Press, 2910 LeMone Boulevard, Columbia, MO 65201, phone toll free 1-800-828-1894.

    Sources on Nathan Boone are scanty, but they include an interview by Lyman Draper with the aging pioneer in 1851, a copy of which is available in the Western Historical Manuscript Collection, University of Mis-souri-Columbia. Carole Bills has comp iled an edited writings from Lucille Morris Upton and John K. Hulston in Nathan Boone: The Neglected Hero (Republic: Western Printing Co., 1984). See also Carolyn Foreman, "Nathan Boone," Chronicles of Oklahoma 19:4 (December 1941), 322-47; Charle s W. Graham, "Presenting the Long-Hidden History of Nathan Boone's Life," Kansas City Star, July 21, 1946; and Martha L. Kusiak, "Nathan Boone House," National Register of Historic Places Nomination, 1969.

    Historical Register and Dictionary of the United States Army B. page 230
    Boone, Nathan. Ky. Mo. Capt Mo rangers 25 Mar 1812; major 10 Dec 1813; honorable discharged June 1815; captain mounted rangers 16 June 1832; captain 1 dragoons 15 Aug 1833; major 16 Feb 1847; lieutenant colonel 2 dragoons 25 July 1850; resigned 1 5 July 1853; [died 12 Jan 1857.]
  • Note: 2 3

    Boone was born in Kentucky in 1781. When he was 18, he married a girl from Point Pleasant, Virginia (now W.Va)

    Although generally overshadowed by his famous father, Daniel, in the story books, Nathan was also a genuine hero and pioneer, Lipscomb said.

    Along with a brother, he established the Boone's Lick salt works in central Missouri, which is now a state park. He was one of the original surveyors of Iowa, and one Iowa town is names for him.

    Boone was also a member of the military, Lipscomb said. He retired as a U.S. lieutenant colonel after leading the U.S. mounted rangers in the Blackhawk War, assisting in the capture of Santa Fe, and serving as the military governor of New Mexic o and Texas.
    . . . Boone also was an explorer. He helped determine the boundary between the Creek and Cherokee Indian nations. In 1808, he guided William Clark to what is now Independence, where the two helped establish Fort Osage. The fort, now restored, w as a frontier outpost, of great importance.
    Boone apparently selected the Ozarks as his final home because he was struck by its beauty.
    The 149 year-old home is now open only once a year, during the fall Nathan Boone Rendezvous. At the festival, begun only last year, relatives of Boone from across the country gathered in Ash Grove for three days of historical celebrations.
    This year's festival is scheduled for Sept. 20-22.
    By Patricia Fennewald
    The Daily News
    Note: This article was from a previous year. This year's rendezvous will be held September 14th, 15th and 16th. For additional information see the "Notices" section of this newsletter.

    SIGHTS BOARD MARKS NATHAN BOONE HOME

    Greene County recognizes history built within walls

    ASH GROVE -- It's already recognized on the state and national registers of historical places, but Thursday the Nathan Boone home near Ash Grove received an honor a little bit closer to home.

    The home built in 1837 by the youngest son of pioneer Daniel Boone, was the recipient of a historical marker given by the Greene County Historical Sites Board.

    "There's a lot of meaty history here," said Kitty Lipscomb, sites board chairwomen. "We consider it one of the major ones in the county and one of the most important ones."

    The log cabin, about two miles north of Ash Grove, is now owned by the Gayer Dixon family of Ash Grove. It served as home for the Nathan Boone family until his death in 1856. The Dixon family maintains the home while financing is sought to prese rve and restore it.

    "However, Lipscomb said, much of the history behind the home involves the man and his activities before he settled in Greene County.

    "It's not only the age of the site but the fact that Nathan Boone was important in the early development of not only Greene County but of southeast Missouri," Lipscomb said. "He actually made a lot of contributions to the development of the entir e West."

    Boone was born in Kentucky in 1781. When he was 18, he married a girl from what is not St. Charles.

    Although generally overshadowed by his famous father, Daniel, in the story books, Nathan was also a genuine hero and pioneer, Lipscomb said.

    Along with a brother, he established the Boone's Lick salt works in central Missouri, which is now a state park. He was one of the original surveyors of Iowa, and one Iowa town is names for him.

    Boone was also a member of the military, Lipscomb said. He retired as a U.S. lieutenant colonel after leading the U.S. mounted rangers in the Blackhawk War, assisting in the capture of Santa Fe, and serving as the military governor of New Mexic o and Texas.

    Boone also was an explorer. He helped determine the boundary between the Creek and Cherokee Indian nations. In 1808, he guided William Clark to what is now Independence, where the two helped establish Fort Osage. The fort, now restored, was a f rontier outpost, of great importance.

    Boone apparently selected the Ozarks as his final home because he was struck by its beauty.

    The 149 year-old home is now open only once a year, during the fall Nathan Boone Rendezvous. At the festival, begun only last year, relatives of Boone from across the country gathered in Ash Grove for three days of historical celebrations.

    This year's festival is scheduled for Sept. 20-22.

    By Patricia Fennewald
    The Daily News

    Note: This article was from a previous year. This year's rendezvous will be held September 14th, 15th and 16th. For additional information see the "Notices" section of this newsletter.
  • Note:

    http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=simonbuchanan&id=I8858

    "INDEX TO THE MINUTES OF THE FIRST AND SECOND BOARD OF LAND COMMISSIONERS OF MISSOURI, 1805-1812, 1832-1835," R 929. 3778 138 1981
    He is listed in 6 land deals in St. Louis and St. Charles, MO., as either claimant, owner, or witness from 13 & 14 Feb 1806 to 31 July 1810.
    ----------- --------------------------------- ---------------------------------- -------------------------------
    Also, see "Early Settlers of Missouri as Taken from Land Claims in the Missouri Territory" by Walter Lowrie, copyright 1986, r929. 3778 L955e 1986,
    "Documents, Legislative & Executive of the Congress of the US in relation to The Public Lands from the 1st Session of the First Congress to the First Session of the 23rd Congress. Mar. 4, 1789 to June 15, 1834. vol. 1 page 396
    ------------------------------ ------------------------- --------------------- -------------
    History of Greene County, Missouri
    WRITTEN AND COMPILED FROM the MOST AUTHENTIC OFFICIAL AND PRIVATE SOURCES INCLUDING A HISTORY OF ITS TOWNSHIPS, TOWNS AND VILLAGES, etc., by R. I. Holcombe, Editing Historian
    "Capt. Nathan Boone, son of Daniel Boone, the old Kentucky pioneer, was one of the first settlers of Boone township, located in the heart of the ash grove a large grove of timber, lying mostly in sections nine and sixteen, in which the principal t imber is ash and walnut. Nathan Boone's sons were James, John, Benjamin and Howard. The Boones came here in 1834. It was Nathan Boone and his brother, Daniel M. Boone, sons of old Daniel Boone, who game up the Missouri in 1807, to where is now How ard county, and manufactured salt at what afterwards came to be known as "Boone's Lick." The popular conviction is that the old Daniel Boone himself, gave his name to "Boone's Lick" and the "Boone's Lick country," when the fact is that he never ow ned salt springs in Howard County, and never even resided in that settlement. Old Nathan Boone died in 1856, and is buried in this township a mile and a half north of Ash Grove, with no monument to mark his resting place, and only one or two book s to keep his memory green in the minds of Missourians. It was for Nathan Boone that this township was named, and perhaps this will prove, a more lasting monument than a shaft of marble or brass. "
    ----------------- -------------------------- ------------------------ -------------------- -------------
    HISTORY OF GREENE CO, MO, CONT'D
    " In the "Historical Atlas of Greene County," appears this sketch of the Boone family, and its connection with the early history of Greene county:

    "The western part of the county was explored at an early day by Nathan Boone. He was the youngest son of Daniel Boone, was a captain in the United States service, and was one of the first white men who traversed Southwest Missouri. He was please d with the appearance of the west part of this county, and selected some land in the neighborhood of Ash Grove, and sent out his son to take out preemption rights. Several of the Boone family have since lived in the county. Nathan Boone located i n the heart of Ash Grove?a large grove of timber composed principally of walnut and ash, and receiving its name from the predominance of the latter. James, John, Benjamin and Howard were his sons. His sons-in-law were William Caulfield and Alfre d Horseman, who also settled in the grove. Nathan Boone at one time owned several hundred acres of land. James Boone, his oldest son, is said to be the oldest American white male child born in Missouri, west of St. Louis county. He was born in St . Charles county in 1800. His two daughters, Mrs. Frazier and Mrs. Horseman, and his grandson, James W., besides some other grandsons and grand-daughters, still live near Ash Grove." [148]

    "Now, in rambling further, with your permission, I will lead you fifteen or twenty miles northwest into the noted Ash Grove and Walnut Grove neighborhoods where, in by-gone days, lived the old stock of the Boones and others. Major Nathan Boone, o f old United States army notoriety, whom I well remember, and his three honorable sons, James, John and Howard, have all long ago bid adieu to time, except, probably, John; and of the Boone daughters, much might be said as to their amiability an d respectability. They were the belles of the county at that date ? say forty-four years ago, several of whom have long since passed, away. One is, if living, the wife of Col. F. T. Frazier, who is another highly respected old citizen. [Now (1883 ) deceased.] "

    "And near the Boones was another old and honorable citizen. Dr. Constantine Perkins, who lived there a long and useful life as a physician. I have forgotten when he died, but it was a long time ago. You will find the names of Dr. Perkins and the B oones on the books of the first Masonic lodge in Springfield. [In 1849 or 1850 Dr. Perkins removed to California, and died there about the year 1860.Compiler.] [150] "

    "Not far away we find the traces of other old-timers of respectability, among whom were the Caulfields, Kelleys, Whittenburgs, Looneys, Tatums, Wilsons, Murrays, Robinsons, Wadlows, and further south we come to mention that noted family the Leeper s, of " Leeper's prairie," and the Reynolds, Yeakleys , Lindseys ? all remember; that is, the old ones, forty-eight years ago, who, together with the above named, with others, helped to brave the storms and bear the hardships of the then western w ilderness country, and I am now proud to class them prominently among the distinguished adopted sons of Greene county "
    ------------------------------ -------------------------------- --------------
    74
    GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI, CIRCUIT COURT CASES

    BOOK F
    OCTOBER ADJOURNED TERM 1863
    p 250.
    The State of Missouri to the use of
    Elisha Headlee Public Administrator
    of Greene County having in charge the
    Estate of Nathan Boone, Deceased. Plaintiff
    vs
    Bedford W. Henslee & William S. Norfleet
    as Administrators of Gabriel P. Shack1eford,
    deceased, James Boone, William C. Price,
    Benjamin H. Boone & John Lair Defendants
    Now at this day comes the Plaintiff in the above entitled cause before the undersigned Clerk, in vacation, and files his petition and affidavit stating among other things that the above named Defendants, James Boone, William C. Price, B. Boone an d John Lair have absconded or absented themselves from their usual places of abode in this State so that the ordinary process of Law cannot be served upon them.It is therefore ordered by the Clerk aforesaid, in vacation, that publication be made n otifying them that an action has been commenced against them by petition in the Circuit Court of Greene County, State of Missouri, founded on an Executors Bond given to the State of Missouri by James Boone and Gabriel P. Shackleford as principal s and William C. Price, B.H. Boone and John Lair as securities, conditioned that the said James Boone and G.P. Shackleford as executors of the estate of Nathan Boone, deceased, shall faithfully administer account for pay and deliver all money an d property of said estate and per form all other things required by Law in regard to said estate.Said petition asks for judgment against Defendants for the sum of $8870 with interest on same since 18th August 1860, and unless they be and appear a t the next term of said Court to be holden at the Court House in Springfield, within the County of Greene on the fourth Monday in January 1864 and on or before the sixth day thereof judgment will be rendered against them and their property sold t o satisfy the same.It is further ordered that a copy hereof be published in the Springfield Missourian, a newspaper printed in Springfield within the County of Greene for four weeks successively the last insertion to be at least four weeks befor e the commencement of the next term of said Court.

    ============================================
    194
    GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI, CIRCUIT COURT CASES

    BOOK E
    p 493/494.

    The State of Missouri to the use of Elisha
    Headlee public administrator of Greene
    County State of Missouri having in charge the
    estate of Nathan Boone, deceased Plaintiff
    vs Civil Action
    Redford W. Henslee & William S. Norfleet as
    administrator of the Estate of Gabriel
    Shackleford, deceased, James Boone, M.C.
    Price, Benjamin A. Brown, John Lair Defendants
    Now at this day comes the Plaintiff by attorney and it appearing to the satisfaction of the Court that the Defendants Henslee and Norfleet had been duly served with process at least 15 days before the first day of the present term of this Court an d the other Defendants had been duly notified by publication in the Springfield Journal, a newspaper published in the State of Missouri, for four weeks successively, the last insertion at least four weeks before the first day of the present term o f this Court and having failed to plead, answer or demur to Plaintiff's petition the same is taken as confessed and this action being founded on an administrators bond signed by Defendants.It is therefore considered by the Court that the Plaintiff s have judgment interlocuroty against the Defendants but it not appearing for what amount judgment should be rendered. It is therefore ordered by the Court that an enquiry of damage be had at the next term of this Court when this cause will be mad e final unless cause to the con trary be shown and this cause is continued until the next term of this Court.
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------- -------
    21
    GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI, CIRCUIT COURT CASES

    BOOK F
    JULY TERM 1864
    p 564.

    State of Missouri to the use of
    E. Headlee of N. Boone Deceased Plaintiff
    vs Civil Action
    B.W. Henslee, W.S. Norfleet admins of
    Estate of G.P. Shackleford and
    James Boone, W.C. Price, B.H. Boone
    and John Lair Defendants
    Now at this day comes the parties by attorney and for cause shown the interlocutory judgment rendered in this cause is set aside as to said administrators of G.P. Shackleford and they by leave of Court file their answer in this cause.

    ==================================
    21
    GREENE COUNTY, MISSOURI, CIRCUIT COURT CASES

    BOOK F
    JULY TERM 1864
    p 564.

    State of Missouri to the use of
    E. Headlee of N. Boone Deceased Plaintiff
    vs Civil Action
    B.W. Henslee, W.S. Norfleet admins of
    Estate of G.P. Shackleford and
    James Boone, W.C. Price, B.H. Boone
    and John Lair Defendants
    Now at this day comes the parties by attorney and for cause shown the interlocutory judgment rendered in this cause is set aside as to said administrators of G.P. Shackleford and they by leave of Court file their answer in this cause.
    ---------------=-----------------------------------=---------------------- -----------=-----------
  • Note:

    http://ksmu.org/article/nathan-boone-state-historic-site

    Just north of Ash Grove sits a site that tells the story of America's push westward. KSMU's Michele Skalicky takes you to the Nathan Boone Homestead State Historic site...

    Many people know more about Nathan Boone's father, Daniel than they know about Nathan, but Nathan Boone made a significant mark on history, too.Dave Roggensees is Natural History Manager at the Site. He says Boones' life was significant because h e did so much to bring America west, yet he did it behind the scenes?

    "People in power knew him, but he wasn't one of those that caught the imagination and had works written about 'the famous Nathan Boone of the West.' He was the person who just performed the tasks that were necessary to move us westward, but he di d so outside of the limelight."

    According to Roggensees, Nathan Boone very much followed in his father's footsteps, but he wasn't nearly as famous. He says that gives them an opportunity to teach an important history lesson?

    "We have the heroes, yet it's the common people who pushed forward our nation into its future who carry it forward."

    Nathan's achievements were many, according to Roggensees. He was a scout and guide for William Clark in 1908 when the treaty with the Osage was negotiated on Fire Prairie.In 1820, he helped write the Missouri Constitutional Convention. During th e War of 1812 he was a captain in the Missouri Rangers­federal troops that were raised to protect the territory of Missouri.The Boon Slick area of Central Missouri is named for Nathan Boone and his brother Daniel Morgan Boone.In 1832, Nathan Boon e was recruited to be a captain in the Mounted Ranger Battalion­the 1st mounted unit in the US Army since the War of 1812.He stayed in the Army until 1853...

    "So, we have a man who became the backbone of the Dragoons, the Rangers became Dragoons, and then the Dragoons became the Cavalry, which, that's a classic image from western lore and film, the Cavalry riding in to save the day. Well, when the firs t Dragoon regiment was created in 1833, some of the officers from the Rangers were brought forward, and Nathan was one of those officers."

    Boone helped lay out the Frontier Military Road, in 1837, which linked Fort Gibson to Fort Leavenworth. Nathan Boone was born in Virginia on March 1, 1781 when his father was serving in the Virginia Legislature and Thomas Jefferson was governor. T hat was the same year the Battle of Yorktown was won?

    "So, we have a person here who was born in the year that the United State achieved, at least the military foundation for its independence with the victory at Yorktown."

    Nathan's brother Israel was killed in 1782 in what's called the Last Battle of the Revolution­the Battle of the Blue Licks?

    "And, Nathan grew up hearing this lore, and that's part of the beauty of this site."

    Nathan Boone was respected for his knowledge of the land between the Mississippi River and the Rocky Mountains and for his knowledge of and ability to communicate with all of the Indian Tribes in the region?

    "He worked with the Stokes Commission setting up a boundary between the Cherokee Tribe and the Creek Tribe in the Territory in 1833 and 1834. He did the same thing in what became Iowa between the Sioux and the Sauk and Fox to keep those tribes sep arated once treaties were made with them, and he was the person whe could communicate and safely perform these tasks without getting killed."

    According to Roggensees, for more than 40 years, Nathan Boone was instrumental in the United State's relations with Native American tribes.Nathan moved his family to Southwest Missouri in 1837. Land drew the Boone's west­Roggensees says the hous e they built is evidence of their effort to bring order out of the land and use it for their future. The house is made out of ash and walnut logs harvested on site.The land was designated an historic site in 1991 by the Missouri Department of Natu ral Resources. The house was restored and efforts continue to bring the landscape back to what it once was. Prairie grasses once again grow in fields around the house as they did when the Boone's first arrived there. Much of the original house wa s retained, though some flooring had to be replaced?

    Roggensees says the house is the artifact at the site­it's a physical artifact that was witness to the oral histories being written down.In 1851, Nathan and his wife had a houseguest­Lymond Copeland Draper--who carried out the 1st major oral histo ry project. Draper's collection, according to Roggensees, is invaluable to studying the period before the Civil War. Not too far away from the house are two cemeteries?one is the Boone family cemetery, another was for slaves. Roggensees says the B oones' story is the story of America?

    "The institutions he was a part of--he was a part of Indian removal, he was a part of the slave system--those were negatives, yet, he handed on a faith in the future that has carried us to today, and, maybe, if we can look at his examples and loo k at how society has grown, we can keep charting a course for the future so that history will serve us today, and that'll give us hope for tomorrow. That's a lot of the Boone story. It is a story of America, and we're all a part of that story."

    View photos of the Nathan Boone Homestead State Historic Site at ksmu.org.
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  • FILE: ~/Documents/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/NathanBoone.pict
  • Title: NathanBoone.pict
  • _TYPE: PHOTO
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  • FILE: ~/Documents/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/NathanNeglectedHero.pict
  • Title: NathanNeglectedHero.pict
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  • FILE: ~/Documents/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/NathanBooneHomestead.pict
  • Title: NathanBooneHomestead.pict
  • _TYPE: PHOTO
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  • OBJE:
  • FORM: pict
  • FILE: ~/Documents/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/n.booneHome.STCharles.pict
  • Title: n.booneHome.STCharles.pict
  • Note: The Daniel Boone home, nearly 200 years old, is large even by today's standards. It rises four stories -- counting a kitchen and dining room in what might be considered a basement -- with limestone walls that are 2 1/2 feet thick. The home has sev en fireplaces (it originally had 10) and a ballroom on the top floor.
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  • Title: Nathan/DanielBooneHome.pict
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  • Title: NathanBooneHomestead2.pict
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  • Title: NathanBooneHomestead3.pict
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  • FILE: ~/Documents/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/booneNathanHome.jpg
  • Title: booneNathanHome.jpg
  • _TYPE: PHOTO
  • _PRIM: N
  • _SIZE: 300.000000 211.000000
  • OBJE:
  • FORM: jpg
  • FILE: ~/Documents/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/boone,nathanhomeLivingRoom.jpg
  • Title: boone,nathanhomeLivingRoom.jpg
  • Note: Living room Nathan Boone Log Cabin which is currently under renovation
  • _TYPE: PHOTO
  • _PRIM: N
  • _SIZE: 438.000000 293.000000
  • OBJE:
  • FORM: jpg
  • FILE: ~/Documents/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/booneNathanRootCellar.jpg
  • Title: booneNathanRootCellar.jpg
  • Note: Root Cellar, Nathan Boone Log Cabin
  • _TYPE: PHOTO
  • _PRIM: N
  • _SIZE: 287.000000 433.000000
  • OBJE:
  • FORM: jpg
  • FILE: ~/Documents/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/booneNathanKitchenArea.jpg
  • Title: booneNathanKitchenArea.jpg
  • Note: Nathan Boone Log Cabin, view of kitchen area
  • _TYPE: PHOTO
  • _PRIM: N
  • _SIZE: 435.000000 292.000000
  • OBJE:
  • FORM: jpg
  • FILE: ~/Documents/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/booneNathanTombstone.jpg
  • Title: booneNathanTombstone.jpg
  • Note: Carole Bills, author of "Nathan Boone the Neglected Hero" stands over Nathan's Grave on the homestead
  • _TYPE: PHOTO
  • _PRIM: N
  • _SIZE: 434.000000 290.000000
  • OBJE:
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  • FILE: ~/Documents/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/missouriStateMap1895.jpg
  • Title: missouriStateMap1895.jpg
  • _TYPE: PHOTO
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  • FILE: ~/Documents/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/stcharlesMO.jpg
  • Title: stcharlesMO.jpg
  • _TYPE: PHOTO
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  • FILE: ~/Documents/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/greeneMO.jpg
  • Title: greeneMO.jpg
  • _TYPE: PHOTO
  • _PRIM: N
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  • OBJE:
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  • FILE: ~/Documents/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/dadeMO.jpg
  • Title: dadeMO.jpg
  • _TYPE: PHOTO
  • _PRIM: N
  • _SIZE: 500.000000 477.000000
  • OBJE:
  • FORM: gif
  • FILE: ~/Documents/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/booneNathanDrawing.gif
  • Title: booneNathanDrawing.gif
  • _TYPE: PHOTO
  • _PRIM: N
  • _SIZE: 117.000000 140.000000
  • OBJE:
  • FORM: jpg
  • FILE: ~/Documents/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/booneNathanFtGibson.jpg
  • Title: booneNathanFtGibson.jpg
  • Note: http://digital.library.okstate.edu/Chronicles/v002/v002p119.html
  • _TYPE: PHOTO
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  • OBJE:
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  • FILE: ~/Documents/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/CaptainNathanBoone.jpg
  • Title: CaptainNathanBoone.jpg
  • _TYPE: PHOTO
  • _PRIM: N
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  • OBJE:
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  • FILE: ~/Documents/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/NathanBoonesExpeditimap1843.jpg
  • Title: NathanBoonesExpeditimap1843.jpg
  • _TYPE: PHOTO
  • _PRIM: N
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  • OBJE:
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  • FILE: ~/Documents/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/nathanbooneOklahomaSign.jpg
  • Title: nathanbooneOklahomaSign.jpg
  • Note: Nathan Boone made camp 3.5 mile southwest. Captain Boone, son of Daniel Boone, under orders of General Zachary Taylor Army Department Comdr. In Summer 1843 let exploratory expedition of western prairies.Party departed from Fort Gibson May 14, an d reached as far north as central Kansas. Party crossed Cimmarrion River July 1st and made camp just south of river on Trader Creek on Sunday July 2nd 1843.
  • _TYPE: PHOTO
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  • _SIZE: 640.000000 480.000000
  • OBJE:
  • FORM: jpg
  • FILE: ~/Documents/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/AshGroveHomesteadNBoone.jpg
  • Title: AshGroveHomesteadNBoone.jpg
  • Note: http://www.pastseeker.com/boone/children/nathan/ashgrove.shtml
  • _TYPE: PHOTO
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  • FILE: ~/Documents/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/AshGroveHomesteadNBoone2.jpg
  • Title: AshGroveHomesteadNBoone2.jpg
  • Note: http://www.pastseeker.com/boone/children/nathan/ashgrove.shtml
  • _TYPE: PHOTO
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  • FILE: ~/Documents/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/NathanBoonePic5.jpg
  • Title: NathanBoonePic5.jpg
  • _TYPE: PHOTO
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  • FILE: ~/Documents/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/NathanOliveBooneGraveMark.jpg
  • Title: NathanOliveBooneGraveMark.jpg
  • _TYPE: PHOTO
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  • FILE: ~/Documents/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/Nathan Boone,Capt.jpg
  • Title: Nathan Boone,Capt.jpg
  • Note:
    Description:
    Frontal portrait from unidentified source; he was the brother of Daniel Morgan Boone and son of famous Daniel Boone.

    tem Type: Photograph
    Date: 1843
    Location: P1, General Collection, Boone, Nathan, Number 1
    Subjects: Boone, Nathan, Item Record: # 564
    http://www.kclibrary.org/resources/sc/media.cfm?mediaID=564
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  • FILE: ~/Documents/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/NathanBoone_Uniform1839.jpg
  • Title: NathanBoone_Uniform1839
  • _TYPE: PHOTO
  • _PRIM: N
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  • OBJE:
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  • FILE: ~/Documents/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/mb-nathanboone.jpg
  • Title: mb-nathanboone
  • _TYPE: PHOTO
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  • FILE: ~/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/NathanBoone_Uniform1840's.jpg
  • Title: NathanBoone_Uniform1840's
  • _TYPE: PHOTO
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  • FILE: ~/Documents/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/NathanBoone_Uniform1840's.jpg
  • Title: NathanBoone_Uniform1840's
  • _TYPE: PHOTO
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  • OBJE:
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  • FILE: ~/Documents/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/NathanBooneHomeAshGroveMO.jpg
  • Title: NathanBooneHomeAshGroveMO
  • _TYPE: PHOTO
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  • OBJE:
  • FORM: pdf
  • FILE: ~/Documents/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/NathanBooneArticle1855.pdf
  • Title: NathanBooneArticle1855
  • _TYPE: PDF
  • _PRIM: N
  • OBJE:
  • FORM: pdf
  • FILE: ~/Documents/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/ColNathanBooneRetirement.pdf
  • Title: ColNathanBooneRetirement
  • Note:
    Resignation of a Lieutenant-Colonel in the Army (News Article)
    Date: 1853-07-20; Paper: Sun
  • _TYPE: PDF
  • _PRIM: N
  • OBJE:
  • FORM: pdf
  • FILE: ~/Documents/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/NathanBooneDiary_1843.pdf
  • Title: NathanBooneDiary_1843
  • Note:
    Dan Boone's Son Recounts History in Diary of 1843 (News Article)
    Date: 1937-12-19; Paper: Dallas Morning News
  • _TYPE: PDF
  • _PRIM: N
  • OBJE:
  • FORM: pdf
  • FILE: ~/Documents/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/NathanBooneLetter_JamesCraig1842.pdf
  • Title: NathanBooneLetter_JamesCraig1842
  • Note:
    From the Galena Gazette Oregon and California (Letters)
    Date: 1843-05-11; Paper: Wisconsin Democrat
  • _TYPE: PDF
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  • FILE: ~/Documents/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/CaptNathanBoone.jpg
  • Title: CaptNathanBoone
  • _TYPE: PHOTO
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  • _SIZE: 220.000000 320.000000
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  • FILE: ~/Documents/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/Nathan Boone Home St Charles.jpeg
  • Title: Nathan Boone Home St Charles
  • Note: Library of Congress Photo Collection, 1840-2000
  • _TYPE: PHOTO
  • _PRIM: N
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    Father: Daniel Boone b: 22 OCT 1734 in Exeter Township, Berks Co., Pennsylvania
    Mother: Rebecca Bryan b: 9 JAN 1738 in Winchester, Frederick Co., Virginia

    Marriage 1 Olive Van Bibber b: 13 JAN 1783 in Greenbrier Co., (W) Virginia
    • Married: 26 SEP 1799 in Little Sandy, Kentucky
    • Note: marr. near present day Greenup, Ky.
    Children
    1. Has Children James Boone b: 3 JUL 1800 in St. Charles Co., Missouri
    2. Has Children Delinda Boone b: 3 FEB 1802 in St. Charles Co., Missouri
    3. Has Children Jemima Boone b: 17 MAR 1804 in St. Charles Co., Missouri
    4. Has Children Susannah "Susan" Boone b: 8 MAR 1806 in St. Charles Co., Missouri
    5. Has No Children Nancy Boone b: 14 MAR 1808 in St. Charles Co., Missouri
    6. Has No Children Emilia "Mela" Boone b: 22 SEP 1810 in St. Charles Co., Missouri
    7. Has Children Olive Boone b: 18 MAR 1812 in St. Charles Co., Missouri
    8. Has Children Benjamin Howard Boone b: 15 MAR 1814 in Missouri
    9. Has Children John Coulter Boone b: 13 MAY 1816 in St. Charles Co., Missouri
    10. Has Children Levica Boone b: 17 JUN 1818 in Missouri
    11. Has Children Melcina Boone b: 15 APR 1820 in Missouri
    12. Has Children Mary O. Boone b: 22 JAN 1822 in St. Charles Co., Missouri
    13. Has Children Sarah Boone b: 21 FEB 1824
    14. Has Children Mahala S. Boone b: 24 SEP 1826 in Missouri

    Marriage 2 Caroline Maria Boone b: 5 AUG 1819 in Kentucky
      Children
      1. Has No Children Caroline Maria Boone b: 25 AUG 1850 in Polk Co., Missouri

      Sources:
      1. Type: Web Site
        Author: Ozark's Watch
        URL: http://198.209.8.166/ozarkswatch/ow504h.htm
      2. Type: Newsletter
        Date: August 2001
        Text: VAN BIBBER PIONEERS E-NEWSLETTER
        A free monthly electronic newsletter for the VAN BIBBER, VANBIBER, VAN BEBBER,
        VANBEBER, VANBABER, VANBEVER, and VANBEVERS families.
      3. Type: Web Site
        Author: Gary R. Hawpe
        Title: Vol. 4 No. 10 - August 2001
        URL: http://www.zoomnet.net/~blogan/
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