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  • ID: I437
  • Name: Daniel Boone
  • Sex: M
  • Birth: 22 OCT 1734 in Exeter Township, Berks Co., Pennsylvania
  • Note: new calendar b. 2 Nov 1734
  • Death: 26 SEP 1820 in Charette Village, St. Charles Co., Missouri
  • Note: Died at Nathan Boone's home
  • Burial: 28 SEP 1820 Cemetery Near Jemima's Farm, St. Charles Co., Missouri
  • Burial: 1845 Frankfort, Franklin Co., Kentucky, (Reinterred)
  • Note: [or perhaps not reinterred??]
  • Occupation: Frontiersman / Explorer
  • Note: 1 2 3 4

    Colonel Daniel Boone aka: Daniel Morgan Boone (Sr.)
    b. , c. Nov. 2, 1734, Berks County, Pa.; d. , c. Sept. 26, 1820, St. Charles, Mo., U.S. (Encyclopædia Britannica Online)
    "I have shown you the family records, which in my father's own handwriting show his birth to have been Oct. 22, 1734. This date is according to the old calendar, or Old Style, as he and my mother always expressed their disapproval of adopting th e New Style calendar." Nathan Boone
    DIED.-On the 26th ult. [Sep.] at Charette Village [which was on Femme , Osage Creek, in St. Charles County, Mo.], in the ninetieth [actually 85th] year of, his age, the celebrated Col. DANIEL BOONE, discoverer and first, settler of the State of Ke ntucky.
    another source says Died:  26 Sep 1820 Place:  St. Charles Co., Mo At Age 85yrs, 11mos., And 4 Days

    - October 22, 1734 Old Style date which he always insisted on using --

    I've seen this quote in several forms­2 examples:
    I have never been lost, but I will admit to being confused for several weeks. - Daniel Boone
    or
    I can't say I was ever lost, but I was bewildered once for three days. - Daniel Boone

    More than any other man, Daniel Boone was responsible for the exploration and settlement of Kentucky. His grandfather came from England to America in 1717. His father was a weaver and blacksmith, and he raised livestock in the country near Readi ng, Pennsylvania. Daniel was born there on November 2, 1734.
    If Daniel Boone was destined to become a man of the wild, an explorer of unmapped spaces, his boyhood was the perfect preparation. He came to know the friendly Indians in the forests, and early he was marking the habits of wild things and bringin g them down with a crude whittled spear. When he was twelve his father gave him a rifle, and his career as a huntsman began.
    When he was fifteen, the family moved to the Yadkin Valley in North Carolina, a trek that took over a year. At nineteen or twenty he left his family home with a military expedition in the French and Indian War. There he met John Finley, a hunte r who had seen some of the western wilds, who told him stories that set him dreaming. But Boone was not quite ready to pursue the explorer's life. Back home on his father's farm he began courting a neighbor's daughter, Rebecca Bryan, and soon the y were married.
    In 1767 Boone traveled into the edge of Kentucky and camped for the winter at Salt Spring near Prestonsburg. But the least explored parts were still farther west, beyond the Cumberlands, and John Finley persuaded him to go on a great adventure.
    On May 1, 1769, Boone, Finley, and four other men started out. They passed Cumberland Gap and on the 7th of June, they set up camp at Station Camp creek. It was nearly two years before Boone returned home, and during that time he explored Kentuc ky as far west as the Falls of the Ohio, where Louisville is now. There was another visit to Kentucky in 1773, and in 1774 he built a cabin at Harrodsburg. On this trip, Boone followed the Kentucky River to its mouth.
    Colonel Richard Henderson of the Transylvania Company hired Boone as his agent, and in March 1775, Boone came again to the "Great Meadow" with a party of thirty settlers. They began to clear the Wilderness Road and by April they were establishin g their settlement at Boonesborough.
    Boone left the Bluegrass in 1788 and moved into what is now West Virginia. Ten years later he again heard the call of unknown country luring him, this time to the Missouri region. As his dugout canoe passed Cincinnati, somebody asked why he was l eaving Kentucky. "Too crowded" was his answer. He lived in Missouri the rest of his life, although he twice revisited Kentucky before he died at the age of 85.
    He was buried beside his wife in Missouri. A quarter of a century later they were brought back to the Bluegrass and laid to rest in Frankfort's cemetery. There they rest, on a bluff above the river and town, on a "high, far-seeing place" like th e ones he always climbed to see the land beyond. . . a monument to the new country in the wilderness which they had helped to explore and settle.
    Story by Col. George M. Chinn, Director, Kentucky Historical Society
    Note 1: Colonel Daniel Boone spent the winter of 1769-70, in a cave, on the waters of Shawanee, in Mercer county. A tree marked with his name is yet standing near the head of the cave.
    Note 2: In 1775, having been engaged as the agent of a Carolina trading company (as mentioned above) to establish a road by which colonists could reach Kentucky and settle there, he built a stockade and fort on the site of Boonesboro. The first g roup of settlers crossed the Cumberland Gap to Boonesboro by the road established by Boone, later called the "Wilderness Road". During the American Revolution the community suffered repeated attacks, and in 1778 Boone was taken captive by India n raiders. The settlement, however, was eventually established as a permanent village.
    Hollywood-style movies made on the subject:
    "Daniel Boone", 1936. George O'Brien. Rating: **1/2
    "Daniel Boone, The Trailblazer", 1956, color. Rating: **1/2

    " DANIEL BOONE "......................VINTAGE PRINT (1920) OF THE FAMOUS PIONEER...........BOONE, Daniel (1734-1820). At a time when most Americans were content to live along the Atlantic coast, Daniel Boone was one of the restless pioneers who p ushed westward through the wilderness. Often accompanied by their families, these men and women explored, cut trails, and sometimes established new communities. Daniel Boone was born near what is now the city of Reading, Pa., on Nov. 2, 1734. H e was the sixth of 11 children in a Quaker farming family. Daniel probably had no regular schooling, but he learned about cattle, horses, wagons, blacksmithing, and weaving. An aunt taught him to read and write. On his 12th birthday, when he wa s already an expert hunter and trapper, his father gave him a new rifle. He spent long days in the woods, learning to shoot and trap and developing great physical strength and agility. When Boone was about 16, his family sold their farm and trek ked south. In the Yadkin River valley in North Carolina they staked out a farm and settled down. In 1755 Boone joined Gen. Edward Braddock's expedition that attempted to drive the French from Fort Duquesne (Pittsburgh). An ambush by French an d Native American forces ended the Braddock expedition, but Boone escaped . Returning home, Boone married his childhood sweetheart, Rebeccah Bryan, who often traveled with him. He visited the Kentucky wilderness in 1767 and returned in 1769 to sp end two years hunting and trapping. Once he and a companion were surprised by Indians but escaped while their captors slept. When Indian tribes went to war in Lord Dunmore's War (1774), Boone helped defend frontier forts. Boonesborough. In 177 5 Col. Richard Henderson, a Carolina judge, hired Boone to take 30 men to cut a trail 300 miles (480 kilometers) through the wilderness of the Cumberland Gap to the Kentucky River. The trail became the Wilderness Road from eastern Virginia into K entucky. The group built log cabins and started a fort at the end of the trail. They named the settlement Boonesborough (now Boonesboro). When settlers began to move into Kentucky, the local Shawnee became alarmed and attacked Boonesborough an d other settlements. On July 14, 1776, a Shawnee raiding party captured and carried off Boone's 14-year-old daughter, Jemima, and two friends. Following the raiders with some companions, Boone rescued the girls. During the American Revolution Bo one became a captain in the Virginia militia (1776). He was captured by the Shawnee (1778), but Boone escaped. He made his way on foot 160 miles (260 kilometers) in four days, reaching Boonesborough in time to warn the settlers that the Indian s were about to attack. When the Kentucky Territory became part of Virginia, Boone was elected to the Virginia legislature (1781). Captured when British cavalry raided Charlottesville, where the legislature was meeting, Boone was later freed. Ba ck in Kentucky, he joined in the pursuit of Indians who had attacked Bryan's Station. The Kentuckians rushed into an ambush, but Boone again escaped. Later years. In 1784 John Filson, an explorer and historian, published the book 'The Discovery , Settlement, and Present State of Kentucky', a work containing an "autobiography" of Boone. The book spread Boone's fame as a frontiersman who helped extend the new nation beyond the Allegheny Mountains. Boone, however, was still a poor man. Be cause he had neglected to file papers or pay taxes, he did not own any of the thousands of acres of land he had claimed in Kentucky and had helped to open to settlement. Again he and his family moved, this time up the Ohio River and into the Kana wha Valley in what is now West Virginia. At times Boone kept a store or tavern, guided settlers over the mountains, or sold horses. In 1791 he was elected to the Virginia legislature a second time. In 1799 the Boones again moved west. In the L ouisiana Territory west of the Mississippi River, Boone received a tract of land from the Spanish governor and was appointed a magistrate. But he found himself landless again when the United States bought the territory from France in 1803. In ab out 1810 Boone returned to Kentucky and paid old debts and bills. He later settled down in Missouri with his family. He died on Sept. 26, 1820. He was buried by his wife on a hilltop overlooking the Missouri River. Years later his body was take n back to Kentucky.

    A legendary hero even at the time of his death, his fame spread worldwide when in 1823 Lord Byron devoted seven stanzas to him in "Don Juan."


    The romantic legend leading to the marriage of Daniel Boone and Rebecca Bryan has Daniel leveling his long-rife at Rebecca as she was on her way to the spring to fetch some water. Daniel, displaying his aptitude for tracking game, followed his "d eer" back to her fathers house where he met and "fell in love with Rebecca......so the story goes.....".


    In the year 1900 there was founded, in the New York University, the Hall of Fame, wherein it was planned to honor one hundred and fifty great Americans, thirty foreign born Americans and sixty American women. The persons whose duty it was to sele ct the names of the persons to be thus honored being empowered to vote every five years, completing the list in the year 2000. At a meeting held in the year 1915, of the electors whose ballot admits to the Hall of Fame, the names of seven great Am ericans were added to the list of those previously admitted, and among the seven was that of "DANIEL BOONE, PIONEER," the subject of this sketch.

    On July 9, 1921, Ray Baker, director of the mint, announced the completion, at the Philadelphia mint, of the quarter of a million dollars in special fifty cent pieces, authorized by congress in commemoration of the one hundredth anniversary of Mis souri statehood.

    "The coin is the regulation half dollar size. The obverse shows the head of Daniel Boone with the dates 1821 and 1921, on either side of the figure. On the reverse are figures of an Indian and of a Missouri pioneer, with twenty-four stars. At t he top is the legend, 'Missouri Centennial' and at the bottom, 'Sedalia,' where the Missouri celebration is to be held." (K. C. Star, July 10, 1921.) Missouri being the twenty-fourth state to be admitted into the Union.

    We have followed Daniel Boone throughout the course of his life, down to the most recent honor paid his memory, and will here let him rest; confident are we in the belief that while the names of other men who were endowed with more learning or wh o rose higher in the councils of his day will have been forgotten, the fame of Daniel Boone will continue and will be a source of pride to each of his descendants.
    JESSE PROCTER CRUMP.

    . . . While the men were held as captives, several were adopted by Shawnee families. While it may seem strange to us, this ritual was very common during the Revolutionary War - and before. Daniel Boone, who had become very fond of Chief Blackfis h, was adopted by Blackfish. Because Boone wore a heavy pack and walked slowly, the Shawnee thought he resembled a turtle. Boone was given the Shawnee name "Sheltowee" which means "Big Turtle." . . .

    Boone, Daniel - Mythologized early U. S. pioneer responsible for the exploration of Kentucky. Although his Masonic membership is unprovable, here is what Nathan Boone had to say about his father's funeral: "Father's body was conveyed to Flander s Callaway's home at Charette, and there the funeral took place. There were no military or Masonic honors, the latter of which he was a member, as there were then but very few in that region of the country." (Hammon, Neal O. (ed.) "My Father, Da niel Boone- The Draper Interviews with Nathan Boone." Lexington, Kentucky: The University Press of Kentucky, 1999. p. 139.)

    "Many heroic exploits and chivalrous adventures are related to me which exist only in the regions of fancy. With me the world has taken great liberties, and yet I have been but a common man." . . . Daniel Boone

    He said: "I explored from the love of nature, I've opened the way for others to make fortunes, but a fortune for myself was not what I was after."
  • Note:




    "Many heroic exploits and chivalrous adventures are related to me which exist only in the regions of fancy.
    With me the world has taken great liberties, and yet I have been but a common man." ....Daniel Boone


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    Saturday, 08 Mar 2003  

    Fort Boonesborough
    Located on the banks of the Kentucky River
    in present Madison County, Kentucky

    At the unveiling of the bust of Colonel Daniel Boone of Kentucky in the Hall of Fame in Washington, D.C., on May 12, 1926, he was memorialized as "the founder of the First American democracy in 1775, with the building of its capitol, Fort Boonesbo rough, on the site of Boone's Kentucky home of 1770."


    Fort Boonesborough, named for Daniel Boone, was begun in April, 1775 and is called the "Birthplace of Kentucky." This is a sketch of what the fort looked like when the Boones lived there according to Moses Boone, son of Squire Boone, brother of Da niel Boone. Moses lived at the fort with his family.

    Moses Boone [23 Feb 1769, NC - 08 Mar 1852, IN] stated that the fort contained about one acre and was one-third longer than wide. This calculates to about 180 feet by 240 feet. Moses's sketch of the fort agrees with Col. Richard Henderson's sketc h in almost all areas. Moses stated that after his uncle Daniel returned from captivity (with the Indians) in 1778 the fort was put in repair with new stocking added where needed and the walls were extended to the east. He said that a second stor y was added to the stockades (on each corner) but that they were not roofed as they ran out of time before the attack which resulted in the fort remaining under seige by Indians for 11 days.

    The "town" of Boonesboro was layed out in 1775 by Daniel Boone, Richard Henderson and the Transylvania Company, and was the first chartered town in Kentucky. Town lots were sold at the very first lottery held in what would be the state of Kentucky . After peace was established with the Indians, Boonesborough served as a trading place until the early 1800s. The population of the town dwindled to 68 people by 1810, and by 1820, the year that Colonel Daniel Boone passed away, was no longer con sidered a town. Collins' 1847 "History of Kentucky" refers to Boonesborough as "a small and dilapidated village."

    Boonesborough State Park is southeast of Lexington at the end of Athens-Boonesborough Road. It is in northern Madison county along the Kentucky River on KY 627 and KY 388.
  • Note:

    http://www.newspaperabstracts.com/link.php?action=detail&id=56150
    Idaho Daily Statesman
    Contributed by Gigimo

    Description: Two Venerable Citizens. One of Them Has the Rifle of Their Kinsman, Daniel Boone.
    Date: January 20 1895

    Newspaper published in: Boise, Idaho

    Nevada, Mo., Jan. 3. There is no family more widely known in Missouri than that of the BRYANS. Jonathan BRYAN, the father of Elijah and James BRYAN, who resides here built the first flouring mill in St. Louis, which was erected on the river Des Pe res.

    Elijah BRYAN is now in his ninety-fifth year, and his brother, James, is 87. Elijah has resided continuously in what is now the state of Missouri since December, 1800, and he is therefore the oldest citizen of our state. He helped to guard the for ts and fight the Indians in what is now St. Charles county from 1813 to 1816, which period of history gives the first Indian war in this state.

    The old Flintlock rifle, "Charley," which he carried in the early days is still in his possession. It has never been altered to suit modern requirements, but it remains just as it was nearly 100 years ago.

    This gun was a great favorite of Daniel BOONE, a relative of the BRYANS, who then lived on Femmage, Osage Creek, in St. Charles county. During the massacre of the RAMSEY family near the present town of Marthasville, in Warren county, by Black Haw k and his band, in 1816, Elijah was summoned, with other men able to bear arms, to go in pursuit, but on arriving at the scene of the massacre he was detailed, on account of lameness, as one of the guards at Fort Charrette, which stood then on th e north bank of the Missouri river, a mile and a half south of the present site of Marthasville.

    He could ride horseback better than any of the neighbors, but in following Indian trails through the woods the men were compelled to walk. As he was lame and using crutches, which he has been compelled to do to the present day, he was required t o remain behind with the boys and old men to guard the fort.

    He has voted at every national and state election since 1820. He was an enthusiastic "old line Whig" until that party was absorbed by the American and Republican parties in 1859, when he joined the Democratic party and has voted with it ever since .

    James BRYAN, his brother, was born in St. Charles county and came to Vernon county a number of years before the late civil war. He carried the American flag in front of the funeral procession that laid the remains of the great pioneer, Daniel BOON E, to rest in this state. He also fought in the Seminole war.

    He has a splendid memory and tells thrilling anecdotes that came under his observations in his early days. They belonged to a long lived family. Their father, Jonathan, died at the age of 86. One of his sisters, Nancy COLE, died three years ago a t Mexico, Mo., aged 91 years.

    Jonathan BRYAN, their father, was a brother in law of Daniel BOONE, and his name was made famous in history by the many thrilling adventures he made in the annals of the early settlement of the western states. The two nephews have a number of reli cs which were the property of Daniel BOONE, which they prize highly. J. E. MARTIN
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  • Note:
    Artist's conception of Daniel Boone at approximately age 40.

    http://www.rootsweb.com/~kycrrsek/danielboone.html
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  • FILE: ~/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/Boone,D.yadkin.jpg
  • Title: Boone,D.yadkin.jpg
  • Note:
    At Home on the Yadkin
    Daniel Boone was born in Pennsylvania in 1734. When he was sixteen the family headed south, finally settling in the Yadkin River Valley in North Carolina. It was here that Daniel met his wife, Rebecca. She is shown in this painting, standing by th eir small son, James. On the right of the canvas, Daniel and his younger brother, Edward, discuss the results of target practice.
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  • FILE: ~/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/Boone, D marching.jpg
  • Title: Boone, D marching.jpg
  • Note:
    Marching With Braddock
    In 1755 Daniel Boone had marched with the British general, Edward Braddock, in the French and Indian War. Braddock was mortally wounded during an expedition to capture the French stronghold of Fort Duquesne. England lost more than a thousand men t hat day. Daniel Boone, George Washington, and most of the other colonial troops, who were supporting the British cause, escaped.
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  • FILE: ~/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/Boone,D gap.jpg
  • Title: Boone,D gap.jpg
  • Note:
    The Cumberland Gap
    In this canvas Dr. Bouquet depicts Daniel Boone, John Findley, and four other explorers as they enter the new land called Kentucky in 1769. The great Shawnee chief, Cornstalk, looks down from the sky with disfavor as the white strangers penetrat e "the Gap" and move into prime Indian hunting territory.
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  • Title: Boone,D road.jpg
  • Note:
    The Wilderness Road
    In this painting Daniel Boone leads settlers along the Wilderness Road toward Kentucky. It is 1775 on the eve of the American Revolution. Here Boone is shown in action as he works to control his horse. Soon the entire group of settlers will be thr ee hundred miles deep within the wilderness, with no one to rely on except each other.
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  • FILE: ~/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/Boone,D girls.jpg
  • Title: Boone,D girls.jpg
  • Note:
    Capture of the Girls
    Although the winter of 1775-76 brought isolated Indian attacks against the new settlement, Fort Boonesborough, by the following summer life on the frontier was relatively quiet again. On July 14, however, Boone's daughter, Jemima, and two of her y oung friends, Betsey and Fanny Callaway, were captured by Indians while canoeing on the Kentucky River near the fort. The small group of Shawnee marched the girls into the dark hills, heading north in the direction of the Ohio River.
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  • FILE: ~/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/Boone,D rescue.jpg
  • Title: Boone,D rescue.jpg
  • Note:
    Rescue of the Girls
    In this canvas Boone, who has organized a rescue party with the help of Richard Calloway, surprises the Indians who have halted to prepare a meal. Following a fierce gun battle, the three teenagers are rescued. It is important to note that, althou gh the girls were with the Indians for three days, none suffered any harm.
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  • FILE: ~/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/boone,D Capture.jpg
  • Title: boone,D Capture.jpg
  • Note:
    Capture of Boone
    During the winter of 1778 the settler's supply of salt, which was used to cure hides and preserve meat, began running low.Boone therefore, led a company of some thirty men to the Blue Licks where they planned to make a year's supply of the vital p reservative. In February, though, Boone was captured while away from the main group of salt makers by Chief Black Fish. In this painting Dr. Bouquet shows Boone being marched into camp under Shawnee guns. He surrenders the entire group of Kentucki ans to the Indians without firing a shot.
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  • FILE: ~/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/Boone,D camp.jpg
  • Title: Boone,D camp.jpg
  • Note:
    In the Camp of Black Fish
    Daniel Boone and the other salt makers were marched north across the frozen Ohio River to the British outpost, Fort Detroit. Later Boone lived for four months in the main Shawnee camp. Although a prisoner, Daniel was soon declared by Chief Black F ish to be his adopted son, and the two men developed a profound respect for each other. It is at this point in the saga that one becomes aware of the eerie feeling of kinship which existed between Boone and the Indians he met during his life. Thi s canvas includes Daniel, Black Fish, two Shawnee warriors, and an Indian girl. Most historians agree that Boone lived with a Shawnee girl during the months he was in the camp of Black Fish.
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  • FILE: ~/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/Boone,D blackfish.jpg
  • Title: Boone,D blackfish.jpg
  • Note:
    Boone Meets Black Fish
    The setting of this painting is outside Fort Boonesborough. It is now August of 1778 and Daniel Boone, having realized that Black Fish plans to march south and destroy the frontier forts, has escaped back to Kentucky. Note the British soldier in t he background. It should be remembered that this is during the American Revolution,and the Shawnee were supporting the British. Here Boone and Black Fish discuss a possible truce. Talks somehow break down, however. The father and his adopted son a re about to fight each other for a full ten days!
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  • FILE: ~/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/Boone,D battle.jpg
  • Title: Boone,D battle.jpg
  • Note:
    Battle for Boonesborough
    In this canvas Dr. Bouquet captures the exact moment this battle begins. Some of the Kentuckians were caught outside the fort as they talked with the British and Indians, attempting to avoid conflict. Here Boone and the other settlers race towrd t he safety of the fort. After days of fighting, Black Fish tried to tunnel under the fort, and then attempted to burn it to the ground. Rain saved the settlers, and Black Fish and his four hundred braves withdrew.
  • _TYPE: PHOTO
  • _PRIM: N
  • _SIZE: 265.000000 211.000000
  • OBJE:
  • FORM: jpg
  • FILE: ~/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/Boone,D blue Licks.jpg
  • Title: Boone,D blue Licks.jpg
  • Note:
    Battle of Blue Licks
    During the siege of Bryan's Station by British and Indians in the summer of 1782, Daniel Boone hoped to avenge the slaughter of hundreds of farm animals. Instead, they were ambushed at Blue Licks and routed. In this painting we see Daniel, alread y beginning to retreat as his son, Israel,fights on. Israel Boone was killed that day, in what many historians regard as the last battle of the American Revolution.
  • _TYPE: PHOTO
  • _PRIM: N
  • _SIZE: 267.000000 208.000000
  • OBJE:
  • FORM: jpg
  • FILE: ~/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/Boone,D down ohio.jpg
  • Title: Boone,D down ohio.jpg
  • Note:
    Down the Ohio
    By 1786 Daniel Boone had filed claims on more than one hundred thousand acres in Kentucky, but eventually he lost it all, either to land sharks, or to the government for back taxes. His disgust with this situation continued to grow until finally , in 1799, he left Kentucky, leading a party of Boones, Bryans and Callaways down the Ohio to Missouri. Here we see the canoes on the river and Daniel on the southern shore. He always claimed he walked "every step of the way" to the new territory.
  • _TYPE: PHOTO
  • _PRIM: N
  • _SIZE: 260.000000 208.000000
  • OBJE:
  • FORM: jpg
  • FILE: ~/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/Boone,D :Nathan home.jpg
  • Title: Boone,D /Nathan home.jpg
  • Note:
    The Boone Home
    Once in Missouri, Daniel Boone was awarded some eight hundred and fifty acres by the Spanish governor there. He was also appointed judge for the Femme Osage district in what is now St. Charles County. The home in this painting was built by Danie l and his son, Nathan. Here we see Daniel and his wife, Rebecca as an old couple. To the left is Daniel Morgan Boone, another of their sons. Daniel Morgan had come to Missouri earlier to scout the new territory.
  • _TYPE: PHOTO
  • _PRIM: N
  • _SIZE: 263.000000 208.000000
  • OBJE:
  • FORM: jpg
  • FILE: ~/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/Boone,D & derry.jpg
  • Title: Boone,D & derry.jpg
  • Note:
    Daniel and Derry
    This painting depicts Daniel Boone and a young boy named Derry outside of the Boone home. The two often hunted together. While we do not know exactly how far west Daniel ventured in his old age (some have him traveling as far as Wyoming) we do kno w he once visited Fort Osage near present day Independence. Daniel Boone died at the Boone home in St. Charles County, September 26, 1820.
  • _TYPE: PHOTO
  • _PRIM: N
  • _SIZE: 264.000000 209.000000
  • OBJE:
  • FORM: jpg
  • FILE: ~/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/Boone,D ObituaryMaryland.jpg
  • Title: Boone,D ObituaryMaryland.jpg
  • Note: Here is the complete, genuine issue of NILES' WEEKLY REGISTER newspaper from Baltimore Maryland dated Nov. 4, 1820. On an inside page of this 16 page issue is a very historic report on the recent death of Daniel Boone (see photo below). On EBAY , Feb. 2001
  • _TYPE: PHOTO
  • _PRIM: N
  • _SIZE: 409.000000 512.000000
  • _CROP: 0.000000 7.000000 409.000000 505.000000
  • OBJE:
  • FORM: gif
  • FILE: ~/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/boone,d trailblazer.gif
  • Title: boone,d trailblazer.gif
  • _TYPE: PHOTO
  • _PRIM: N
  • _SIZE: 388.000000 287.000000
  • OBJE:
  • FORM: jpg
  • FILE: ~/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/booneDanielObit.jpg
  • Title: booneDanielObit.jpg
  • Note: http://earlyamerica.com/earlyamerica/bookmarks/obits/boone.html
  • _TYPE: PHOTO
  • _PRIM: N
  • _SIZE: 519.000000 592.000000
  • _CROP: 0.000000 0.000000 518.666687 592.000000
  • OBJE:
  • FORM: pict
  • FILE: ~/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/booneDanielWriting.pict
  • Title: booneDanielWriting.pict
  • Note: DANIEL BOONE (1734 - 1820) American pioneer who explored the Kentucky region and guided settlers into the area, constructed a fort at what is now Boonesboro, remembered for his many close calls with hostile Indians. A.D.S. "Daniel Boone" with orig inal drawing, 1p. legal folio, Dec. 22 n.y., a land survey undertaken by Boone in his native Kentucky. In part: "....Survaid for Thomas Logwood forteen thousand Eight hundred acres of Land beginning at the mouth of a Large Crick Running into Licki ng...". Boone has also drawn a 4 1/2" x 5" map of the 14,800 acre tract, including a river and its tributaries. Text and signature have lightened a bit, negligible loss to a few letters in text expertly restored, with a 2" x 5" area of paper at lo wer-right lacking yet not affecting signature nor text. $8,000-10,000 (e-bay)
  • _TYPE: PHOTO
  • _PRIM: N
  • _SIZE: 500.000000 327.000000
  • OBJE:
  • FORM: gif
  • FILE: ~/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/BooneDanielSig.gif
  • Title: BooneDanielSig.gif
  • Note: The signature of Daniel Boone which is shown under his picture herewith is a reproduction of the original signed to a letter of his dated May 6, 1806,
  • _TYPE: PHOTO
  • _PRIM: N
  • _SIZE: 497.000000 150.000000
  • OBJE:
  • FORM: jpg
  • FILE: ~/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/booneDanielMODefianceGrave.jpg
  • Title: booneDanielMODefianceGrave.jpg
  • _TYPE: PHOTO
  • _PRIM: N
  • _SIZE: 240.000000 158.000000
  • OBJE:
  • FORM: jpg
  • FILE: ~/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/BooneDanielKYFrankfort.jpg
  • Title: BooneDanielKYFrankfort.jpg
  • _TYPE: PHOTO
  • _PRIM: N
  • _SIZE: 200.000000 275.000000
  • OBJE:
  • FORM: jpg
  • FILE: ~/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/boonesboroughFt1778.jpg
  • Title: boonesboroughFt1778.jpg
  • _TYPE: PHOTO
  • _PRIM: N
  • _SIZE: 299.000000 203.000000
  • OBJE:
  • FORM: jpg
  • FILE: ~/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/booneDanelLandDeed.jpg
  • Title: booneDanelLandDeed.jpg
  • Note: www.indiana.edu/~liblilly/ history/history2.html
  • _TYPE: PHOTO
  • _PRIM: N
  • _SIZE: 500.000000 679.000000
  • _CROP: 0.000000 174.000000 500.000000 505.000000
  • OBJE:
  • FORM: jpg
  • FILE: ~/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/dboone.jpg
  • Title: dboone.jpg
  • _TYPE: PHOTO
  • _PRIM: N
  • _SIZE: 464.000000 618.000000
  • _CROP: 80.000000 181.000000 349.000000 367.000000
  • OBJE:
  • FORM: jpg
  • FILE: ~/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/BooneDanielOldOriginal.jpg
  • Title: BooneDanielOldOriginal.jpg
  • _TYPE: PHOTO
  • _PRIM: N
  • _SIZE: 509.000000 640.000000
  • _CROP: 25.000000 201.000000 427.000000 400.000000
  • OBJE:
  • FORM: jpg
  • FILE: ~/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/booneDanNewspaperDeath.jpg
  • Title: booneDanNewspaperDeath.jpg
  • Note: Here is a COMPLETE, genuine Newspaper with the following title, date and description: NILES' WEEKLY REGISTER, Baltimore, Nov. 4, 1820 "Chronicle" on an inside pg. includes a report: "Col. Daniel Boone...the latest St. Louis papers state that he di ed at Chraette village, on the Missouri, on the 26th of Sept., in his ninetieth year of his age..." Octavo-size, 16 pgs. good. I have been a dealer in rare newspapers for over 25 years and every item I offer is guaranteed to be absolutely genuine . A U.S. winner pays $5 shipping. Click here for answers to common questions on old newspapers and to see our other historic issues currently available.
  • _TYPE: PHOTO
  • _PRIM: N
  • _SIZE: 512.000000 640.000000
  • _CROP: 111.000000 0.000000 332.000000 433.000000
  • OBJE:
  • FORM: jpg
  • FILE: ~/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/CumberlandGapDBoone.jpg
  • Title: CumberlandGapDBoone.jpg
  • _TYPE: PHOTO
  • _PRIM: N
  • _SIZE: 1024.000000 813.000000
  • _CROP: 0.000000 58.333313 1024.000000 754.666687
  • OBJE:
  • FORM: jpg
  • FILE: ~/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/dabooneDocument.jpg
  • Title: dabooneDocument.jpg
  • Note:
    http://www.indiana.edu/~liblilly/history/history21.html

    Daniel Boone Land Deed
  • _TYPE: PHOTO
  • _PRIM: N
  • _SIZE: 500.000000 679.000000
  • _CROP: 0.000000 331.666656 500.000000 347.333344
  • OBJE:
  • FORM: jpg
  • FILE: ~/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/booneDanielYoungColor.jpg
  • Title: booneDanielYoungColor.jpg
  • _TYPE: PHOTO
  • _PRIM: N
  • _SIZE: 228.000000 352.000000
  • OBJE:
  • FORM: jpg
  • FILE: ~/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/BooneLetter1785.jpg
  • Title: BooneLetter1785.jpg
  • Note:
    http://www.lib.uchicago.edu/tfw/scans/manuscripts/Boone.jpg
    AUTHOR: Boone, Daniel.
    TITLE: [Letter to Col. William Cristen]
    PLACE: [S.l.]
    YEAR: 1785
  • _TYPE: PHOTO
  • _PRIM: N
  • _SIZE: 728.000000 910.000000
  • _CROP: 0.000000 127.333313 728.000000 742.666687
  • OBJE:
  • FORM: jpg
  • FILE: ~/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/boonesboroughFt1778.jpg
  • Title: boonesboroughFt1778.jpg
  • _TYPE: PHOTO
  • _PRIM: N
  • _SIZE: 299.000000 203.000000
  • OBJE:
  • FORM: jpg
  • FILE: ~/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/Boonesborough.jpg
  • Title: Boonesborough.jpg
  • Note:
    http://www.lib.uchicago.edu/tfw/scans/maps/Boonesborough.jpg
    TITLE: The Old Fort at Boonesborough
    PLACE: Boonesborough, Kentucky
    YEAR: [1---?]
  • _TYPE: PHOTO
  • _PRIM: N
  • _SIZE: 555.000000 886.000000
  • _CROP: 0.000000 381.000000 555.000000 505.000000
  • OBJE:
  • FORM: jpg
  • FILE: ~/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/DBooneColePainting.JPG
  • Title: DBooneColePainting.JPG
  • Note: Daniel Boone Sitting at the Door of his Cabin on the Great Osage Lake, Kentucky, 1826
  • _TYPE: PHOTO
  • _PRIM: N
  • _SIZE: 481.000000 446.000000
  • OBJE:
  • FORM: gif
  • FILE: ~/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/BooneDanielPaintingKy.gif
  • Title: BooneDanielPaintingKy.gif
  • Note:
    by William C. Allen
    The artist presented this romanticized portrait of Kentucky's preeminent frontiersman to the Commonwealth of Kentucky in 1839.
    http://www.lrc.state.ky.us/kidspage/artwork.htm
  • _TYPE: PHOTO
  • _PRIM: N
  • _SIZE: 494.000000 714.000000
  • _CROP: 0.000000 157.000000 494.000000 557.000000
  • OBJE:
  • FORM: gif
  • FILE: ~/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/DBooneDrawing.gif
  • Title: DBooneDrawing.gif
  • _TYPE: PHOTO
  • _PRIM: N
  • _SIZE: 221.000000 208.000000
  • OBJE:
  • FORM: jpg
  • FILE: ~/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/dboone.jpg
  • Title: dboone.jpg
  • _TYPE: PHOTO
  • _PRIM: N
  • _SIZE: 464.000000 618.000000
  • _CROP: 0.000000 61.000000 464.000000 557.000000
  • OBJE:
  • FORM: gif
  • FILE: ~/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/logCabinofDanBooneMo.gif
  • Title: logCabinofDanBooneMo.gif
  • Note: http://www.pastseeker.com/boone/missouri/dbtomo.shtml
  • _TYPE: PHOTO
  • _PRIM: N
  • _SIZE: 254.000000 207.000000
  • OBJE:
  • FORM: jpg
  • FILE: ~/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/BoonesborosketchMosesBoone.jpg
  • Title: BoonesborosketchMosesBoone.jpg
  • Note:
    http://www.pastseeker.com/boone/kentucky/bboro.shtml
    Fort Boonesborough, named for Daniel Boone, was begun in April, 1775 and is called the "Birthplace of Kentucky." This is a sketch of what the fort looked like when the Boones lived there according to Moses Boone, son of Squire Boone, brother of Da niel Boone. Moses lived at the fort with his family.
  • _TYPE: PHOTO
  • _PRIM: N
  • _SIZE: 648.000000 544.000000
  • OBJE:
  • FORM: jpg
  • FILE: ~/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/DanielBooneKilledBar1817.jpg
  • Title: DanielBooneKilledBar1817.jpg
  • Note:
    http://www.angelfire.com/tn/speleoexpress/info.html
    Daniel Boone killed a bear 1817
  • _TYPE: PHOTO
  • _PRIM: N
  • _SIZE: 330.000000 215.000000
  • OBJE:
  • FORM: jpg
  • FILE: ~/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/BooneHighwayMarker.jpg
  • Title: BooneHighwayMarker.jpg
  • Note:
    There were originally 358 of these Boone Trail Highway tablets made and placed from Virginia Beach, VA to San Francisco, CA. They were done by a Mr. J. Hampton Rich of Mocksville, NC, whose Boone Memorial Association had as its objective the raisi ng of the Boone reputation and its memory in the American consciousness.
    The marker . . . is one that is registered and located at Hillsville, VA

    http://home.ntelos.net/~gmarshall7/
  • _TYPE: PHOTO
  • _PRIM: N
  • _SIZE: 438.000000 586.000000
  • _CROP: 0.000000 29.000000 438.000000 557.000000
  • OBJE:
  • FORM: jpg
  • FILE: ~/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/boonemoLogCabin.jpg
  • Title: boonemoLogCabin.jpg
  • Note:
    Believed to be the log cabin Daniel Boone built upon arrivein in St. Charles Co., Mo. - Photographed in the late 1800's
    http://www.aboutfamouspeople.com/article1143_2.html
  • _TYPE: PHOTO
  • _PRIM: N
  • _SIZE: 200.000000 124.000000
  • OBJE:
  • FORM: jpg
  • FILE: ~/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/DanielBoonepowder-horn.jpg
  • Title: DanielBoonepowder-horn.jpg
  • Note:
    http://www.boonesociety.org/
    Daniel Boone Powder Horn
    "Daniel Boone traded it to William Robert Leslie in about 1790. It has passed from father to son ever since: from William Robert Leslie to Robert Leslie to James Harvey Leslie to John Buchanan Leslie to Shirley Hugh Leslie (Shirley was a male, th e father of Gene B. Leslie.) and finally to Gene Bennet Leslie, my stepfather, recently deceased." (This lineage has been verified through census records by Society President Cochran.) . . . .
    . . . "The Horn is covered with carvings, Boone's initials, deer, snakes, daisies, geometric figures and many other things. There is a knife scabbard on the back of the pouch . . . ."
  • _TYPE: PHOTO
  • _PRIM: N
  • _SIZE: 315.000000 231.000000
  • OBJE:
  • FORM: mp3
  • FILE: ~/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/DanielBoone_MargeryMilesPic.MPG
  • Title: DanielBoone_MargeryMilesPic
  • _TYPE: SOUND
  • _PRIM: N
  • OBJE:
  • FORM: jpg
  • FILE: ~/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/boonesurvey.jpg
  • Title: boonesurvey
  • _TYPE: PHOTO
  • _PRIM: N
  • _SIZE: 750.000000 526.000000
  • OBJE:
  • FORM: jpg
  • FILE: ~/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/Daniel_Boone_GreatAmericanBust_060.jpg
  • Title: Daniel_Boone_GreatAmericanBust_060
  • Note: http://www.bcc.cuny.edu/HallofFame/onLineTour/browse.cfm?StartRow=60&BrowserStartRow=6
  • _TYPE: PHOTO
  • _PRIM: N
  • _SIZE: 301.000000 427.000000
  • _CROP: 32.000000 58.000000 233.000000 319.000000
  • OBJE:
  • FORM: jpg
  • FILE: ~/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/Daniel_Boone_GreatAmericanBust_060.jpg
  • Title: Daniel_Boone_GreatAmericanBust_060
  • Note: http://www.bcc.cuny.edu/HallofFame/onLineTour/browse.cfm?StartRow=60&BrowserStartRow=6
  • _TYPE: PHOTO
  • _PRIM: N
  • _SIZE: 301.000000 427.000000
  • OBJE:
  • FORM: jpg
  • FILE: ~/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/daniel-boone-Statue_NYHoF.jpg
  • Title: daniel-boone-Statue_NYHoF
  • Note:
    This bust of Daniel Boone, elected to the Hall of Fame for Great Americans in 1915, was executed by Albin Polasek in 1926. Daniel Boone (1734-1820) was an American pioneer and hunter whose frontier exploits made him one of the first folk heroes o f the United States. Boone is most famous for his exploration and settlement of what is now the U.S. state of Kentucky, which was then beyond the western borders of the Thirteen Colonies. Despite resistance from American Indians, for whom Kentuck y was a traditional hunting ground, in 1775 Boone blazed the Wilderness Road through the Cumberland Gap and into Kentucky. There he founded Boonesborough, one of the first English-speaking settlements beyond the Appalachian Mountains. Boone wa s a militia officer during the American Revolutionary War which in Kentucky was fought primarily between settlers and British-allied American Indians.

    The Hall of Fame for Great Americans--the original "Hall of Fame", was conceived of by Dr. Henry Mitchell MacCracken, Chancellor of New York University from 1891 to 1910. It was designed as part of the school's undergraduate campus in University H eights in the Bronx, which is today the campus of Bronx Community College of The City University of New York. The Hall of Fame stands on the heights occupied by the British army in its successful attack upon Fort Washington in the autumn of 1776 . MacCracken, once said "Lost to the invaders of 1776, this summit is now retaken by the goodly troop of 'Great Americans', General Washington their leader. They enter into possession of these Heights and are destined to hold them, we trust, forev er."

    The memorial structure is a sweeping open-air colonnade, 630 feet in length, designed in neoclassical style by the Stanford White. Financed by a gift from Mrs. Finley J. Shepard (Helen Gould), the Hall of Fame was formally dedicated on May 30, 190 1. The Colonnade was designed with niches to accommodate 102 sculptured works and currently houses the busts and commemorative plaques of 98 of the 102 honorees elected since 1900. Each bronze bust, executed by a distinguished American sculptor, m ust be made specifically for The Hall of Fame and must not be duplicated within 50 years of its execution. To be eligible for nomination, a person must have been a native born or naturalized citizen of the United States, must have been dead for 2 5 years and must have made a major contribution to the economic, political, or cultural life of the nation. Of the 17 categories in The Hall of Fame, Authors is the largest, with Statesmen following closely.

    The complex of three buildings adjoining the Colonnade--Gould Memorial Library, the Hall of Languages, and Cornelius Baker Hall of Philosophy--were also designed by Stanford White and bear a close conceptual relationship to the Colonnade, with th e library as the central focus.

    National Register #79001567 
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/wallyg/218119808/in/photostream/
  • _TYPE: PHOTO
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  • _SIZE: 375.000000 500.000000
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  • FORM: pdf
  • FILE: ~/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/DBooneHallofFame_Induction.pdf
  • Title: DBooneHallofFame_Induction
  • _TYPE: PDF
  • _PRIM: N
  • OBJE:
  • FORM: jpg
  • FILE: ~/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/DanielBooneSilverMedal_HallOfFame.jpg
  • Title: DanielBooneSilverMedal_HallOfFame
  • _TYPE: PHOTO
  • _PRIM: N
  • _SIZE: 496.000000 496.000000
  • OBJE:
  • FORM: jpg
  • FILE: ~/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/DBoone_Judgmenttree.jpg
  • Title: DBoone_Judgmenttree
  • _TYPE: PHOTO
  • _PRIM: N
  • _SIZE: 368.000000 700.000000
  • OBJE:
  • FORM: jpg
  • FILE: ~/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/Boonesborough_Fort_in_Kentucky_Book_Made_1887__3.jpg
  • Title: Boonesborough_Fort_in_Kentucky_Book_Made_1887__3
  • _TYPE: PHOTO
  • _PRIM: N
  • _SIZE: 694.000000 597.000000
  • OBJE:
  • FORM: jpg
  • FILE: ~/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/Ft Boonesborough_MosesBooneDraw.jpg
  • Title: Ft Boonesborough_MosesBooneDraw
  • Note:

    Fort Boonesbourough drawing by Moses Boone
  • _TYPE: PHOTO
  • _PRIM: N
  • _SIZE: 648.000000 544.000000
  • OBJE:
  • FORM: jpg
  • FILE: ~/Snyder Genealogy/Reunion 9 NEW/Pictures/Ft Boonesborough_.jpg
  • Title: Ft Boonesborough_
  • Note: Fort Boonesborough 1775
  • _TYPE: PHOTO
  • _PRIM: N
  • _SIZE: 727.000000 791.000000

    Father: Squire Boone b: 25 NOV 1696 in Bradninch, Exeter, Devonshire, England
    Mother: Sarah Jarman Morgan b: 23 SEP 1700 in Exeter, Berks Co., Pennsylvania

    Marriage 1 Rebecca Bryan b: 9 JAN 1738 in Winchester, Frederick Co., Virginia
    • Married: 14 AUG 1756 in Rowan Co., North Carolina
    • Note: Daniel Boone and Rebeccah Bryan were married August 14, 1756, the ceremony being performed by Squire Boone who was then a Justice of the Peace for Rowan County, North Carolina.
    Children
    1. Has No Children James Boone b: 3 MAY 1757 in Davis Co., North Carolina
    2. Has No Children Israel Boone b: 25 JAN 1759 in Davis Co., North Carolina
    3. Has Children Susannah Boone b: 2 NOV 1760 in Rowan Co., North Carolina
    4. Has Children Jemima Boone b: 4 OCT 1762 in Rowan Co., North Carolina
    5. Has Children Levina Boone b: 23 MAR 1766 in Yadkin River, Rowan Co., North Carolina
    6. Has Children Rebecca Boone b: 26 MAY 1768 in Wilkes Co., North Carolina
    7. Has Children Daniel Morgan Boone b: 23 DEC 1769 in Virginia
    8. Has Children Jesse Bryan Boone b: 23 MAY 1773 in Yadkin Valley, Rowan Co., North Carolina
    9. Has No Children William Boone b: 20 JUN 1775 in Clinch River, Virginia
    10. Has Children Nathan Boone b: 2 MAR 1781 in Boones Station, Fayette Co., Kentucky

    Sources:
    1. Type: Book
      Author: Neal O. Hammon
      Periodical: My Father, Daniel Boone: The Draper interviews with Nathan Boone
      Publication: University Press of Kentucky (the)
      Page: 70, 71
      Page: 115
      Page: 28
      Page: 136, 137
    2. Type: Web Site
      URL: http://booneinfo.com/daniel.htm
    3. Type: Web Site
      Title: Famous Trials - Daniel Boone
      URL: http://www.lawbuzz.com/famous_trials/daniel_boone/why_treason.htm
      Date: 1/21/2002
    4. Type: Web Site
      Author: (copyright) 1998-2002 by Edward L. King
      Title: Famous Masons
      URL: http://www.masonicinfo.com/famous1.htm