Caswell County Family Tree

Entries: 68458    Updated: 2014-10-10 03:15:11 UTC (Fri)    Contact: Richmond Frederick    Home Page: Caswell County Historical Association

For more information on the purpose and scope of this Caswell County Family Tree see the Caswell County Family Tree Guidelines.

Index | Descendancy | Register | Pedigree | Ahnentafel | Public Profile | Add Post-em

  • ID: I54870
  • Name: Luke Lea 1
  • Sex: M
  • Birth: 21 JAN 1783 in Surry County, North Carolina
  • Reference Number: 49922
  • Title: Colonel
  • Burial: Westport Cemetery (Kansas City, Missouri)
  • Death: 17 JUN 1851 in Kansas
  • Note:
    Luke Lea (1783-1851)

    Luke Lea Portrait (1783-1851)

    Luke Lea Article

    Luke Lea Article #2

    (for larger image, click on photograph, then click "Actions/View all Sizes")
    _______________

    While it appears reasonable, no primary source has been found confirming that the Luke Lea, Jr. of this entry is the son of Luke Lea and Elizabeth Wilson Lea. He does not appear to be a brother of Pryor Lea as is stated in the following biography.
    _______________

    Luke Lea (January 21, 1783- June 17, 1851) was a two-term United States Representative from Tennessee. Lea was born in Surry County, North Carolina and moved with his parents in 1790 into what would become Hawkins County, Tennessee. As a young man he was a clerk for the Tennessee House of Representatives ( 1804 - 1806). He later commanded a regiment under General Andrew Jackson in the Seminole and Creek War of 1818, and then moved to Campbells Station, Tennessee, in Knox County. Lea was elected to the 23rd Congress and re-elected to the 24th Congress, serving from March 4, 1833 to March 3, 1837. He changed parties for his second term from Democratic to Whig.

    He then served as Tennessee Secretary of State from 1837 to 1839. On September 9, 1850 he was appointed Indian agent by President Millard Fillmore for Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, serving in that capacity until his death the following year. He was buried in Kansas City, Missouri. Lea was the brother of Pryor Lea [not believed correct], a two-term Tennessee Congressman ( 1827- 1831), who was later a Texas state senator and a prominent Confederate supporter in Texas. He was also the great-grandfather of Luke Lea, founder of the Nashville Tennessean newspaper and a U.S. Senator from Tennessee from 1911 to 1917. This article incorporates material obtained from the public domain Biographical Directory of the United States Congress.

    Source: Wikipedia Contributors, "Luke Lea (1783-1851)," Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, Luke Lea (accessed October 31, 2011).
    _______________

    Colonel Luke Lea, Jr., born January 24, 1783, in Surry County, North Carolina, died 17 July 1851 near Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, married 28 February 1816 in Knox County, Tennessee, Susan Wells McCormick, granddaughter of "Trooper" James Armstrong and Ann Taves/Tevis. Colonel Luke Lea, Jr., was Clerk of the Tennessee House of Representatives 1804-1806, U.S. Congressman, Tennessee, 23rd and 24th Congresses, Tennessee Secretary of State under Governor Newton Cannon. Children, among others:

    (a) Margaret Lea, born 23 December 1831 in Knoxville, Tennessee, married Unknown Heneger of Knoxville, Tennessee.

    (b) Judge John MCormick Lea, born 25 December 1818 in Knoxville, Tennessee, died 19 September 1903 in Monteagle, Cumberland Mountain, Tennessee.

    Source: Casey, Albert Eugene. Amite County, Mississippi 1699-1890 (Volume #3): The Environs. Birmingham (Alabama): Southern Historical Press, Inc., 1957, p.566. Print.
    _______________

    Biographical Directory of the United States Congress, 1774-2005

    Name: Luke Lea
    Elected Office(s): Representative, President
    State: Tennessee, Kansas
    Country: USA
    Relationship: Great-grandfather of Luke Lea [1879-1945] and Brother of Pryor Lea

    Biography: (great-grandfather of Luke Lea [1879-1945] and brother of Pryor Lea), a Representative from Tennessee; born in Surry County, N.C., January 21, 1783; moved to Tennessee in 1790 with his parents, who settled in Hawkins County; attended the common schools; clerk in the State house of representatives 1804-1806; commanded a regiment under General Jackson in the Creek and Seminole Wars in 1818; located at Campbells Station, Tenn., and held several minor offices; elected as a Jacksonian to the Twenty-third Congress and reelected as a White supporter to the Twenty-fourth Congress (March 4, 1833-March 3, 1837); secretary of state of Tennessee 1837-1839; appointed by President Fillmore as Indian agent at Fort Leavenworth, Kans., September 23, 1850, and served until his death near Fort Leavenworth, Kans., June 17, 1851; interment in Westport Cemetery (now abandoned), Kansas City, Mo.
    _______________

    From Caswell County to Tennessee: The Lea Family

    In 1810, Bartlett Yancey, Jr., wrote a brief description of Caswell County, North Carolina, for The Star, a newspaper in Raleigh, North Carolina. Here is an excerpt:

    "This county was first settled about the year 1750; from that time until 1754 or 5, there were about 8 or 10 families in that part of the county, now known by the name of Caswell: A family by the name of Reynolds, and two others by the name of Doolittle and Bankston were among the first settlers; not one of the family are now in county, and it is believed not one of their descendants: The Lea's, Graves', Patersons, & Kimbros came to this County about 1753, 54 & 55: they came from Orange and Culpepper in Virginia: Several hundred of their families and their descendants are now living in the County."

    The Lea family that moved to what would become Caswell County included James (Country Line) Lea (1707-1792) and his brother William (South Hico) Lea (c.1715-1804). This article focuses on that branch of the James (Country Line) Lea family that moved to Tennessee.

    James Lea of Country Line Creek was among the first Leas to settle in the area [that became Caswell County], having entered in March 1752 one of the earliest claims for land. From the fact that his son, Major Lea, declared in an affidavit that he (Major) was born in Spotsylvania County, Virginia, in 1742, we deduce that this James Lea was in that county at that time and came to North Carolina from there. He became one of the larger land owners and quite prominent in the affairs of Caswell County, and as a result there are numerous references to him in the records of that county.

    The will of James (Country Line) Lea was proved in March 1792 and the Clerk of Court noted on back of will that he was James Lea of Country Line. In his will, James (Country Line) Lea did not mention his son Luke Lea (born 1739). The year 1771 is about the year Luke Lea removed from Caswell (then Orange) County to Wilkes County or Surry County, North Carolina, later into Tennessee. In 1777 parts of Surry County and Washington District (now Washington County, Tennessee) were combined to form Wilkes County. We know that one son of Luke Lea (and his wife Elizabeth Wilson Lea) was born 1783 in Surry County, North Carolina. The departure of Luke Lea may have caused the father, James (Country Line) Lea, to prepare his will. Luke Lea did not receive his portion of the personal estate of James Lea and he may have returned to Caswell County and forced a division of property.

    Little is known about this Luke Lea who moved west from Caswell County. His first stop westward apparently was Surry/Wilkes County, North Carolina, where he had one or more children. He then proceeded further west into Tennessee, where a child, Pryor Lea, was born in 1794 (Knox County, Tennessee). Some believe Luke Lea moved south from Tennessee to Mississippi, where additional children were born, and where he died in 1813.

    The son born 1783 in Surry County, North Carolina, also is named Luke Lea, and we will refer to him as Luke Lea, Jr. This Luke Lea, Jr., remained in Tennessee, in 1816 married Susan Wells McCormick (1787-1847), and had numerous children.

    The following is based upon the United States Congressional Biography of Luke Lea, Jr.:

    Luke Lea, Jr. (January 21, 1783- June 17, 1851) was a two-term United States Representative from Tennessee. Lea was born in Surry County, North Carolina and moved with his parents in 1790 into what would become Hawkins County, Tennessee. As a young man he was a clerk for the Tennessee House of Representatives (1804-1806). He later commanded a regiment under General Andrew Jackson in the Seminole and Creek War of 1818, and then moved to Campbells Station, Tennessee, in Knox County. Lea was elected to the 23rd Congress and re-elected to the 24th Congress, serving from March 4, 1833 to March 3, 1837. He changed parties for his second term from Democratic to Whig.

    He then served as Tennessee Secretary of State from 1837 to 1839. On September 9, 1850 he was appointed Indian agent by President Millard Fillmore for Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, serving in that capacity until his death the following year. He was buried in Kansas City, Missouri. Lea was the brother of Pryor Lea, a two-term Tennessee Congressman (1827-1831), who was later a Texas state senator and a prominent Confederate supporter in Texas. He was also the great-grandfather of Luke Lea, founder of the Nashville Tennessean newspaper and a U.S. Senator from Tennessee from 1911 to 1917.
    _______________

    Oddly, this official biography does not mention John McCormick Lea (1818-1903), son of Luke Lea, Jr. (1783-1850), father of Overton Lea (1846-1912), grandfather of Colonel Luke Lea (1879-1945), served as U.S. District Attorney, Mayor of Nashville, and Davidson County, Tennessee, Circuit Court Judge.

    Also odd is that many Lea family genealogies do not list Pryor Lea as a son of Luke lea and Elizabeth Wilson Lea. This raises a red flag as to the official claim above that Pryor Lea was a brother of Luke Lea, Jr., and researchers are advised to proceed with caution in this area. Several sources show this Pryor Lea as a son of Major Lea and Lavinia Jarnigan Lea. However, the 1848 will of Lavinia Jarnigan Lea does note mention Pryor Lea.
    _______________

    Records and References

    War of 1812 Service Records
    Name: Luke Lea Jr
    Company: Williams's Mtd. Reg't. E. Tennessee Vols.
    Rank - Induction: Private
    Rank - Discharge: Private
    Roll Box: 123
    Roll Exct: 602

    Bradley County, Tennessee: The survey of the lands in the Ocoee District was begun under the act of the Legislature in the spring of 1837 by John B. Tipton, surveyor-general. His deputies were John Kennedy, J. C. Tipton, Thomas H. Calloway, J. F. Cleveland and John Hannah. The base line for the survey began at a large mass of limestone on the Hiwassee River opposite Charleston, and ran 20 west of south, to the Georgia line, passing through Cleveland. In November, 1838, an entry-taker's office was opened at Cleveland with Luke Lea as entry-taker, and P. J. R. Edwards as land register. The lands were placed upon sale at prices ranging with the time in which it was entered. For the first four months the price was $7.50 per acre: the next four months $5, after which it was reduced to $2 and $1, and finally the last was sold in 1841 at one cent an acre. The settlers from the older counties came in rapidly, and Bradley County soon became quite thickly populated. In 1837, the Hiwassee Railroad was begun, but was not completed to Cleveland until the summer of 1851. In the fall of that year it reached Charleston, and in 1856 was opened to Knoxville, the name meantime having been changed to the East Tennessee & Georgia Railroad. Source: Bradley County History of Tennessee. Chicago and Nashville: The Goodspeed Publishing Co., 1887. Print.
    _______________

    War of 1812 Service Records
    Name: Luke Lea Jr
    Company: Williams's Mtd. Reg't. E. Tennessee Vols.
    Rank - Induction: Private
    Rank - Discharge: Private
    Roll Box: 123
    Roll Exct: 602

    Bradley County, Tennessee: The survey of the lands in the Ocoee District was begun under the act of the Legislature in the spring of 1837 by John B. Tipton, surveyor-general. His deputies were John Kennedy, J. C. Tipton, Thomas H. Calloway, J. F. Cleveland and John Hannah. The base line for the survey began at a large mass of limestone on the Hiwassee River opposite Charleston, and ran 20 west of south, to the Georgia line, passing through Cleveland. In November, 1838, an entry-taker's office was opened at Cleveland with Luke Lea as entry-taker, and P. J. R. Edwards as land register. The lands were placed upon sale at prices ranging with the time in which it was entered. For the first four months the price was $7.50 per acre: the next four months $5, after which it was reduced to $2 and $1, and finally the last was sold in 1841 at one cent an acre. The settlers from the older counties came in rapidly, and Bradley County soon became quite thickly populated. In 1837, the Hiwassee Railroad was begun, but was not completed to Cleveland until the summer of 1851. In the fall of that year it reached Charleston, and in 1856 was opened to Knoxville, the name meantime having been changed to the East Tennessee & Georgia Railroad. Source: Bradley County History of Tennessee. Chicago and Nashville: The Goodspeed Publishing Co., 1887. Print.
    _______________

    This article of a second branch of the Lea family was prepared by John Morgan Weston, historian of Bradley county.

    Luke Lea, 1783-1851 was the most distinguished of the early pioneers of Bradley county and his name is indelibly written into the county history. He was born in Surry county North Carolina, Jan. 28, 1783, and was the twelfth child of the Rev. Luke and Elizabeth Wilson Lea. His grandfather was James Lea, who came from England to Virginia, and later moved to North Carolina. He moved with his parents to Tennessee in 1790, six years before Tennessee was admitted to the Union as a state.

    He commanded a regiment under Gen. Jackson during the Indian Wars in Florida and Creek country in 1808. Returning from the war, he was elected cashier of the state bank at Knoxville, Hugh L. White was president of the bank at the time. He represented the Third Congressional district at the time in the Twenty-third and Twenty-fourth congressional district from 1833- 1837. He was elected by the legislature of Tennessee commissioner to sell the lands of the Occee district, which was purchased by the Cherokee Indians.

    He opened the land office in Cleveland in the fall of 1838, moved his family to Cleveland about the same time and built a large frame residence on the corner Iman and Lea streets, directly south of the General Hospital. The old building was removed several years ago by J. T. Johnson. The lot is now vacant. The large sugar maples along the sidewalk are said to have been planted by Mr. Lea.

    After closing up the sale of lands in the Occee district, he was appointed by President Taylor in 1849, Indian agent at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. He was killed July 17, 1851, by being thrown from his horse as he was returning home to his residence from the agency. He was buried at Westport cemetery (now abandoned), Kansas City, Mo. He married Miss Susan Wells McCormick, the only child of Ann Armstrong and John McCormick. Mrs. Lea was born in 1797 and died in Cleveland, June 9, 1848, and is buried in Fort Hill cemetery, Cleveland. They had nine children, five boys and four girls, eight of whom lived to maturity. Their children were as follows:

    1. James Armstrong Lea
    2. John McCormick Lea
    3. Francis Wells Lea
    4. William Park Lea
    5. Ann E. Lea
    6. Susan Jane Lea
    7. Lavinia Lea
    8. Margaret Lea
    9. Luke Lea, Jr. (died in youth)
    _______________

    1840 United States Federal Census
    Name: Luke Lea
    County: Bradley
    State: Tennessee
    Free White Persons - Males - 10 thru 14: 1
    Free White Persons - Males - 15 thru 19: 1
    Free White Persons - Males - 20 thru 29: 1
    Free White Persons - Males - 50 thru 59: 1
    Free White Persons - Females - 5 thru 9: 2
    Free White Persons - Females - 10 thru 14: 1
    Free White Persons - Females - 15 thru 19: 1
    Free White Persons - Females - 40 thru 49: 1
    Slaves - Males - Under 10: 4
    Slaves - Males - 10 thru 23: 2
    Slaves - Males - 24 thru 35: 1
    Slaves - Females - Under 10: 1
    Slaves - Females - 10 thru 23: 2
    Slaves - Females - 24 thru 35: 2
    Slaves - Females - 36 thru 54: 1
    Total - All Persons (Free White, Free Colored, Slaves): 22
    Persons Employed in Learned Professional Engineers: 1
    Free White Persons - Under 20: 6
    Free White Persons - 20 thru 49: 2
    Total Free White Persons: 9
    Total Slaves: 13
    Total All Persons - Free White, Free Colored, Slaves: 22
    Source Citation: Year: 1840; Census Place: , Bradley, Tennessee; Roll: 517; Page: 67; Image: 139; Family History Library Film: 0024542.
    _______________

    "The oldest date is that on the headstone of Luke Lea, who was Indian agent of Westport. The inscription of the large flat stone reads: LUKE LEA, SR Formerly of Tennessee Born Jan. 21, 1783 Died June 17, 1851 Requiescant in pace"
    _______________

    "I am an historian researching the Indian agents of California and have been reviewing documents dating from late 1851. I keep encountering letters to and ostensibly from Commissioner of Indian Affairs Luke Lea in late 1851, when, as one of the agents noted, Lea had been killed falling off a horse in June at Fort Leavenworth. The agent even commiserated with Deputy Commissioner Charles Mix about it when he read the news in a New York paper in San Francisco. And yet Luke Lea is officially listed as Commissioner from 1850 to 1853. Fillmore appointed a Luke Lea Commissioner of Indian Affairs for Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, and this is the Luke Lea who was killed in 1851. But I suspect he was not the same man as the Commissioner in Washington. Was the Luke Lea who was killed the son or relative of the Commissioner: in other words, a beneficiary of nepotism? None of my online research provides the answer. Thanks for any help you can provide." Source: Message Posted to Ancestry.com by 46spencer 10 November 2012. [However, unable to contact this person.]
    _______________

    Commissioners of Indian Affairs
    1850-1853 Luke Lea

    Bureau of Indian Affairs: First called the Office of Indian Affairs, the agency was created as a division in 1824 within the War Department. Similar agencies had existed in the U.S. government since 1775, when the Second Continental Congress created a trio of Indian-related agencies. Benjamin Franklin and Patrick Henry were appointed among the early commissioners to negotiate treaties with Native Americans to obtain their neutrality during the American Revolutionary War.

    In 1789, the U.S. Congress placed Native American relations within the newly formed War Department. By 1806 the Congress had created a Superintendent of Indian Trade, within the War Department, who was charged with maintaining the factory trading network of the fur trade. The post was held by Thomas L. McKenney from 1816 until the abolition of the factory system in 1822.

    The government licensed traders to have some control in Indian territories and gain a share of the lucrative trade. In 1832 Congress established the position of Commissioner of Indian Affairs. In 1869, Ely Samuel Parker was the first Native American to be appointed as commissioner of Indian affairs.

    The abolition of the factory system left a vacuum within the U.S. government regarding Native American relations. The current Bureau of Indian Affairs was formed on March 11, 1824, by Secretary of War John C. Calhoun, who created the agency as a division within his department, without authorization from the United States Congress. He appointed McKenney as the first head of the office, which went by several names. McKenney preferred to call it the "Indian Office", whereas the current name was preferred by Calhoun.

    In 1849 Indian Affairs was transferred to the U.S. Department of the Interior. The bureau was renamed as Bureau of Indian Affairs in 1947 (from the original Office of Indian Affairs). The Bureau of Indian Affairs has been involved in many controversial policies. One of the most controversial was the late 19th to early 20th century decision to educate native children in separate boarding schools, with an emphasis on assimilation that prohibited them from using their indigenous languages, practices, and cultures. It emphasized being educated to European-American culture. Some were beaten for praying to their own creator god.




    Father: Luke Lea b: DEC 1739 in St. Georges Parish, Spotsylvania County, Virginia
    Mother: Elizabeth Wilson b: 1739

    Marriage 1 Susan Wells McCormick
    • Married: 28 FEB 1816 in Knox County, Tennessee
    • Note:
      Tennessee State Marriages, 1780-2002
      Name: Luke Lea
      Spouse: Susan W Mc Cormick
      Marriage Date: 28 Feb 1816
      Marriage County: Knox
    Children
    1. Has No Children Ann Elizabeth Lea b: ABT 1816
    2. Has Children John McCormick Lea b: 1818
    3. Has No Children William Park Lea
    4. Has No Children Francis Wells Lea
    5. Has No Children James Armstrong Lea
    6. Has No Children Susan Jane Lea
    7. Has No Children Luke Lea Jr.
    8. Has No Children Margaret Lea
    9. Has No Children Lavinia Lea

    Sources:
    1. Details: Amite County, Mississippi 1699-1890 (Volume #3): The Environs, Albert Eugene Casey (1957)

  • Index | Descendancy | Register | Pedigree | Ahnentafel | Public Profile | Add Post-em

    Printer Friendly Version Printer Friendly Version Search Ancestry Search Ancestry Search WorldConnect Search WorldConnect Join Ancestry.com Today! Join Ancestry.com Today!

    WorldConnect Home | WorldConnect Global Search | WorldConnect Help

    RootsWeb.com, Inc. is NOT responsible for the content of the GEDCOMs uploaded through the WorldConnect Program. If you have a problem with a particular entry, please contact the submitter of said entry. You have full control over your GEDCOM. You can change or remove it at any time.