Carolyne's Family Circle

Entries: 20211    Updated: 2010-08-20 19:39:09 UTC (Fri)    Contact: Tina    Home Page: Carolyne's Native American Genealogy Helper

Unless otherwise noted, please verify with primary sources. Notes field often contains source data. A main surname focus is the SWINFORD families of NC, SC, TN, KY, IL, IN, AL, GA, and OK. Also KEPHART, TEMPLETON, NORTON, ALLEN, REED, JOHNSON, WINDERS and SUTTON.

"Respected and revered the old ones still walk with us." --- Momfeather

Index | Descendancy | Register | Download GEDCOM | Public Profile | Add Post-em

  • ID: I7832
  • Name: Simon KEPHART
  • Sex: M
  • Birth: in Maryland?
  • Death: BEF 12 JAN 1801
  • Note:

    Simon's wife, Susannah, died 12 Jan 1801 following childbirth. Her death notice said she was the "Widow Susannah Gebhardt." Apparently she was pregnant when Simon died. Have no status on the child at this time.

    According to research by Susan, she has two family bibles, the results showing that Simon was married first to "Catherine."

    Simon Gebhard/Kephart and his first wife Cathrine had three children:

    Jacob born 6 Sept 1771, christened 27 Oct 1771
    Cathrina born 25 Nov 1773, christened 28 Nov 1773
    Henry christened 26 Jul 1778


    aka KEPHART, GEBHARDT, GEPHART, KEEPHEART, CAPEHEART, KEPHURT

    The 1790 Frederick County Maryland census lists five people named Kephart. None of them are listed on the same page. David, page 177; Jacob, page 221; John, page 237; Peter, page 234; and Simeon, page 256.

    Simeon shows 2 free white males age 16 and up, including head of household; three males under the age of 15 and 2 females over the age of 16. Since Simon and Susanna were married in 1782, the extra male and female over age 16 could not be children of Susanna. They would either be children of a prior marriage, or relatives of Simon. There is not enough information at this time to determine siblings for George, if any.

    There is a record of a Peter Kephart born in Maryland in 1790. No further data at this time.

    Contact: Douglas K. Benson <hdtp57@cs.com>
    Name: Susanna Lieblich
    Sex: F
    Father: Peter Lieblich
    Mother: Susannah
    Marriage 1 Simon Gebhard
    --------------
    Name: Peter Lieblich
    Sex: M
    Marriage 1 Susannah

    Children
    1. Barbara Lieblich b: in Frederick Co., MD
    2. Susanna Lieblich
    -----------------
    Simon Kephart found in:
    Marriage Index: Maryland, 1655-1850
    Married: Aug. 07, 1782 in: Frederick Co., MD
    Record type: This is a county court record. Gender: M
    More about: This record can be found at the County Courthouse Frederick, MD & Family History Library, Salt Lake City, UT, Film # 0014082.
    Spouse name: Leipley, Susannah
    Spouse gender: F

    Simon Kephart found in:
    Genealogical Records: Maryland Settlers & Soldiers, 1700s-1800s
    Listed in: Maryland Records, Volume I
    Colonial Families of the United States Descended from the Immigrants
    Author: Fiedler M. M. Beall
    Call Number: CS71.b384

    This book contains the genealogy of Bell, Beal, Bale, Beale, Beall colonial families who arrived before 1700. Most of the individuals originated from England and Scotland who are now settled in Maryland.

    Bibliographic Information: Beall, Fiedler M. M. Colonial Families of the United States descended from the Immigrants. Chas. H. Potter & Co., Inc. Washington D.C. 1929.

    Colonial Families of the United States Descended from the Immigrants , Page 182
    Cornelia Beall, b 1833; m Simon C. Gephart. [f] Malvina Thistle Beall
    Colonial Families of the United States Descended from the Immigrants , Page 276
    |Greathouse, Rachel | 182 . | |Gephart, Simon C. | 182 | |Gunnell, James

    Peter Kephart found in:
    Marriage Index: Maryland, 1655-1850
    Married: Apr. 18, 1826 in: Frederick Co., MD
    Record type: This is a county court record. Gender: M
    This record can be found at the County Courthouse Frederick, MD & Family History Library, Salt Lake City, UT, Film # 0014082.
    Spouse name: Berger, Susannah
    Spouse gender: F

    Peter Kephart found in:
    Marriage Index: Maryland, 1655-1850
    Married: Sep. 15, 1816 in: Frederick Co., MD
    Record type: This is a county court record. Gender: M
    This record can be found at the County Courthouse Frederick, MD & Family History Library, Salt Lake City, UT, Film # 0014082.
    Spouse name: Peters, Mary
    Spouse gender: F
    ---------------
    Following are some books on this family line, and info on obtaining microfilm/fisches from the Family History Library in Salt Lake City . Order through nearest LDS Family History Center.

    "House of Kephart von Skioldung-Erlach," Call # 929.273 K441K by Walter Downing Kephart. The order# is FHL US/CAN Fiche 6088010.

    "Addendum--Nicholas Gebhardt (1733-1829)" by Lucille Kephart Pester and Leola Kephart Nelson, Call# 929.273 K441K Supp. The FHL order # is VAULT US/CAN Film # 1750779 item 1.

    "Kephart Bible Records (1788-1891)." The Family History Library microfim # is FHL US/CAN Film #317316 item 3. Traces the Bible records of Catherine (Kitty) Davis Kephart (born 1795) of Allen County, Ohio and her husband George Kephart (1788-1838). FHL notes on this book also list records of the Sutton Family.

    *


    The Kephart Story

    The article below was transcribed from "The National Genealogical Society Quarterly" Volume 31, Page 53-64. Some additions have been made from data gathered online. The original unedited article can be found in the text format at FamilyTree/special/ngsq-00.txt. .

    A Danish Royal-Skiöldung Lineage Gebhardt (Kephart, Capehart) and Zincke (Zingge) Descendants of Lords of Erlach By Lt. Col. CALVIN I. KEPHART, ARLINGTON, VA.

    It is a genealogical rarity to discover among the people of certain European countries and the United States today seemingly numerous descendants of an ancient royal family in the direct male line. The family hereinafter discussed apparently represents the oldest and proudest royal stock of all Europe, namely, the ancient Danish royal Skiöldung dynasty of prior to the year 1000, which traditionally descended from Odin and his wife Frigga. The facts down to a certain time are readily provable by such important works as the poem Beowulf, the various sagas and eddas, early Frankish history, the Annals of Fulda, the Chronicle of Abbot Regino of Pruini, the writings of other early religious personages, Viking and other histories, the history of Saxo Grammaticus, the writings of Sir W W. Howorth in Transactions of the Royal Historical Society (England), and, among others, the recent article (1927) on Rurik, founder of the Russian state, by Colonel N. T. Belaiew in the Saga-Book of the Viking Society of London. Then a gap occurs,followed by a series of significant facts, extending over several centuries, that cannot well be decried.

    Odin is said to have led the Danes westward across Europe to the mouth of the Elbe River about 514 B.C. There he conquered far and wide and then moved northerly into the so-called Cimbric Chersonesus (or peninsula), later known as Denmark. He traditionally divided the conquered territory among his sons, that just east of the Elbe River going to Vegdeg and Balder, that along the Rhine river going to Sigge (from whom the Sigambri apparently took their name), and the Danish peninsula going to Skiöldr, from whom the royal family of the last-named country took its name.

    Upon his death, Odin traditionally was buried at the site of the present city of Odinse (Odense - see D-7 on map), on the island of Fünen (Fyn), Denmark, and his son Skiöldr then succeeded him on the Danish throne. Because of his prowess and wisdom, Odin was deified by his followers, as was common in those times. The line of his son Skiöldr (Scyld),including certain kings named in the epic poem Beowulf, continued on the Danish throne in the direct male line, with occasional exceptions, down to A.D.827. During those exceptional periods, the occupant of the throne usually was a descendant of that dynasty in a female line until the time of Godfred, 808-810, when it was usurped by this member of the renowned rival Yngling family. Strangely, he was one of Denmark's most eminent kings and law-givers and ranks with her earlier great kings, such as Ivar Vidfadme and Harald Hildetand.

    The death of the Yngling king Godfred in 810 was the signal for the outburst of serious dynastical strife between his Sons and the legitimate Skiöldung claimants to the Danish throne. Godfred's eldest daughter had married Halfdan (c.755-810), the rightful Skiöldung claimant, who was underking of Zealand. Halfdan was a son of the Danish King Harald, son of another Halfdan and grandson of Harald Hildetand. He ruled about 750 to 770, when he was succeeded by an illustrious cousin, King Wermund of Jutland, who, like his predecessor, was a descendant of Harald Hildetand. The later Halfdan is conspicuous in history as an envoy of his father-in-law, King Godfred, to a convention called by Charlemagne in 782 and as the first Christian of the North.

    This Halfdan's children were Anilo, Harald (Klak), Reginfred, Roerek (Rorik), Hemming, Eric, and several daughters.Upon the slaying of Godfred's son Hemming (king from 810 to 813), who agreed with the Franks upon the Eider River as the boundary between the two nations, and the slaying of Halfdan's son Anilo later the same year, the latter's brothers Harald (underking of Schleswig - see C-1 on map of Germany) and Reginfred were selected as joint kings and their brother Roerek was appointed as underking of Jutland. Reginfred was slain in another dynastic feud in 814, after which Harald occupied the throne alone. He was one of the most romantic, though rather unfortunate, characters of that early time. He was born about 782 and inherited the best blood of both the Skiöldung and the Yngling lines. He was an ancestor in a female line of the great king of Norway, Harald Haarfager (847-930).

    Harald had an exceedingly difficult task to retain his throne against his maternal uncles and appealed to the Frankish emperors for aid. At Ingelheim, near Mainz, in 826, he, his family, his two brothers Roerek and Hemming, and numerous followers were converted to Christianity in an elaborate ceremony conducted by Emperor Louis I (Louis I, the Pious, was crowned emperor in 813,by Charlemagne himself), at which time the attractiveness of the Rhine Valley was not lost on Harald and his followers,as proved by later invasions of the Vikings. But the Frankish rulers were loath to interfere in the internal affairs of the strong barbarian nation on the north, and in 827 Harald finally was dethroned by his maternal uncle Eric, who succeeded him as King Eric I (sometimes called Horic). The latter was cruel and vindictive and experienced a turbulent reign. He ejected Harald's brothers and their adherents from their offices and confiscated their property. His ascension to the throne marked an important transition in Danish royal history, namely, the termination of the Skiöldung rule in the male line, although Harald had several able Sons as legitimate claimants to the throne, namely, Guthorm, Godfred, Siegfred,Halfdan, and Rudolf. The appellation 'Klak' is said to mean 'complainer' and to have been applied to him because of his dynastic difficulties and endeavors to gain aid to recover his throne.

    However, Harald Klak's appeal to Emperor Louis the Pious was not wholly fruitless, for, as a Christian and the son of a Christian. he was granted a fief consisting of the county of Ruistringen, in East Frisia, between the Ems and the Weser Rivers, fronting on the North Sea and extending southward to Meppen, the Hase River, and Bremen, including most of East Friesland and the present state of Oldenburg. There he was joined by his younger brothers Roerek and Hemming and re-established himself as Count of Ruistringen. But in the possession of this territory he was greatly harassed by his vindictive uncle, King Eric of Denmark, although he succeeded in extending his domain as far south as the present isle of Walcheren, where Hemming was killed in its defence in 837.About 852 Harald was assassinated by the Franks, whereupon his brother Roerek succeeded him as Count of Ruistringen.

    In 854 another Eric, distantly related to Harald in a female line, seized the throne from the Ynglings. He is known as King Eric II (also as Horic). He had married a daughter of Guthorm, Harald's eldest son, who was slain in 854, and upon Eric II's death in 860 he was succeeded by his son Guthorm, and this line has continued on the Danish throne through several female descendants down to the present time.

    In 859 Roerek (otherwise called Rurik) traditionally received a call from the Slavs of the region of Novgorod to come to that country and establish an orderly government among the various contending tribes. He took a large army from Ruistringen and succeeded in that mission, so that by 862 he had become prince of the new Russian state. The rulership of his Frisian domain then passed to Harald's eldest son Godfred, who soon laid plans to enlarge it By 881 he had extended his territory to include practically all of the present Netherlands, where he was known in history alternatively as duke or king of Frisia. In that year he seized the castle or stronghold at Hasloo (now called Elsloo, just north of Maastricht), in the southerly part of Limburg province, where he established a regal villa, protected by a stockade, and made it the seat of his government. In 882, under an agreement with Emperor Charles the Fat, he was again Christianized and married (secondly) Gisela, a daughter of King Lothair II,of the later Lorraine. In 885, in consequence of his demand for wine-growing regions toward Andernach, on the Rhine,apparently promised to him earlier, he was assassinated during a conference with Frankish leaders on Batavia Island and his dukedom of Frisia thereupon vanished.

    Godfred was born about 812 and married about 835 probably a sister of Count Gerolf, of East Frisia, who was his loyal vassal. His children included at least sons named Wermund and Harald (Wurm and Hals, princes of the Danish nation,as stated in the Annals of Fulda). These sons must have continued to reside at the baronial seat of Hasloo while the remnant of their followers settled down as their vassals in the defence of their only remaining domain.Thereupon, they apparently disappeared from written history. These two princes must have been born in Ruistringen about 837 and 840 respectively. Who were their descendants and where did they and their own descendants reside? In the light of their antecedents, we have every reason to believe that they left numerous descendants, who thus represented the royal Skiöldungs in the direct male line. With the exceptions presented below, fortuitously discovered,the names and subsequent habitations of these descendants are unrevealed in history, so far as the writer knows.Because of the paucity of data for the 150 years after the time of Wermund and Harald, this gap in the genealogical chart necessitates our introducing the following family as highly probable descendants of the last-named Wermund, son of Duke Godfred, rather than as actually proved posterity.

    In all probability, for a considerable time, in order for Wermund and Harald to preserve their status in the country against surrounding barons and counts who had been harmed during the raids of the Northmen, they must have sought the aid of powerful religious authorities in the region, such as the bishops of Maastricht or of Liege or the archbishops of Cologne. In fact, some of their sons may promptly have entered church military service in that locality as milites episcopi, i.e., bishop's knights, as northern Lorrraine was the scene of warfare during the whole 10th century. So it is not surprising that we should find that a young nobleman named Hugibert, a scion of Viking leaders, born about 1030 in southern Limburg or nearby territory and bearing the name of the patron saint of hunters (Saint Hugibert or Hubert, a former bishop of Maastricht, 708-727), was engaged through church connections in Limburg and at Würzburg for future service as a bishop's knight in the defence of ecclesiastical real property in Lower Franconia. He seems to have been sent as an esquire to the castle of the eminent Count of Rotenburg-on-the-Tsuber, in Lower Franconia, for training for that vocation. An earlier Count Heinrich of Rotenburg had established several religious foundations at Würzburg and the family was deeply interested in having them protected by knights of unquestionable loyalty, who owed no allegiance to any of the baronial families within the jurisdiction of the Count-Bishop of Würzburg.

    In due time, young Hugibert, well educated and instructed in his future duties, was dubbed a knight by the count. His royal antecedents seemingly made him a desirable husband for one of the count's daughters. Marriages of this type were common in those days. That such a marriage occurred is indicated by the fact that the forename Heinrich, of the Rotenburg family, became an honored name among Hugibert's posterity. About 1055 Count-Bishop Adelbero, a descendant of King Conrad I, granted young Hugibert a fief centering on the village of Schonen-Erlach, now Erlach, about 15 kilometers southeast of Würzburg, in the great bend of the Main River, whereupon his name appears in the records as Hugibert de Erlach. He also was a ministerialis of the count-bishop, probably in a magisterial capacity. He died in 1100. The old moated castle at Erlach, erected about 1105, damaged in the Peasants' Revolt of 1525, and restored in 1545, stands today and is owned and used by the local Roman Catholic Church.

    When we realize that the forename Wermund is found only in the Danish royal Skiöldung family and that, even after 150 years from the time of the above-named sons of Duke Godfred, the names of Wermund, Harald (Herolt), and Godfred (Gottfried) along with that of Heinrich were used generation after generation for two additional centuries by the Erlach family, we may be confident that only male posterity of Wermund, son of Godfred, would have shown such reverence for these forenames of remote ancestors, direct or collateral. The uncommon name of Wermund was less likely to be perpetuated during these 350 years by descendants of Wermund's brother Harald and certainly not by a remotely related or an unrelated family.

    Further evidence of the relation of Hugibert de Erlach to people then living in Lower Lorraine is seen in the fact that his eldest son Heinrich and the latter's son of the same name in 1096 joined the army of Duke Godfrey de Bouillon, mainly from Lower Lorraine, on the First Crusade for the capture of Jerusalem from the Moslems. The last testament of the elder Heinrich, expressing his intention to participate in that adventure, is extant. He was killed at the capture of the Holy City on July 15, 1099, but his son returned, assumed his baronial status, and continued the family. His mother was a daughter of the neighboring Lord de Randersacker, whose lordship was near Würzburg and who also probably was of Danish-Viking ancestry, for the name Randers is that of an extensive region in northeastern Jutland. This fact is additional proof of the selection of descendants of Viking leaders to be bishop's knights at Würzburg and of the line of descent developed here. As surnames became fixed, the Erlach name was carried to other regions,such as southern Germany and Austria, by emigrating younger members of the family.

    The Erlach coat-of-arms, adopted at the siege of Antioch in November, 1097, is as follows: Azure, a fess argent charged with a rose gules. Crest: A fan of peacock plumes natural, haft argent between two horns azure with fess argent. Apparently, the blue field was taken from the banner of Lorraine, the rose was the chief wild-flower of medieval Lower Franconia, the horns were a traditional Viking headpiece, and the fan of peacock plumes is emblematic of adventure in the Near East.

    With this introduction, we shall now set out the genealogical chart of the Erlach family for approximately three centuries,with later branches extending to America. It speaks for itself in further proof of this inference of the family's descent from Duke Godfred. In most instances, the earlier names occur in Latin form in the records.
    CHART OF FAMILY TREE

    Chart 1 begins with Harald Klak (c. 782 - 852) He was King of Schleswig from 803 to 813, King of Denmark from 813 to 827, and Count of Ruistringen from 827 to 852.Chart 2 continues with the descendants of Henricus Cinko A.K.A. Heinrich Zincke (c.1202 - 1265).

    The chart is continued below in the text format and it lists the four brothers (Gebhardt and Gerhardt) that arrived in America.

    (16) JOHANNES GEBHART (c. 1495), innkeeper at The Sonnen, Rheinfelden, as of 1549;

    (17) JACOB GEBHART (c. 1523), vocation not known, Rheinfelden;

    (18) KONRAD GEBHART (c. 1547), ropemaker, went to Basel and became a citizen on September 15, 1569: in 1570 married Anna Nägelin (Nageli);

    (19) JACOB GEBHART (born 1580), ropemaker at Basel; in 1600 married Marie Grenzinger;

    (20) JACOB GEBHART (born 1601), potter at Basel; in 1625 married Magdalena Lienhart;

    (21) HANS KONRAD GEBHART (born 1630, died 1680), furrier at Basel; in 1658 married Katharina Strübin (Strub);

    (22) HANS HEINRICH GEBHART (born 1657, died 1725), furrier at Basel; on January 5, 1696,married Barbara Grünauer, daughter of Abraham and Barbara (Guntzer) Grünauer, of Basel. Was restless,discontented, and slow to settle down, which environment was conducive to the emigration of his children.

    (23) HEINRICH GEBHART (born November 30, 1699), who about 1720 emigrated with at least a second-cousin named Strub down the Rhine Valley to probably the County of Hanau-Munzenberg, in or near the city of Hanau, where they married and reared families. Heinrich's wife was Maria Catharina, daughter of David Andreas and Christina Bernhardt, of a patrician family of Solothurn, Switzerland, and he adopted the Reformed faith, to which her family belonged. The spelling of the name also assumed the form of 'Gebhardt.' If there were other Gebhardt children than the immigrants named below, they are not now known.

    The four brothers who came to America were:

    (I) HEINRICH GEBHARDT (1725-1793), who with his wife (name not known) and two children arrived at Philadelphia on the ship St. Andrew on September 23, 1752, and settled in Bristol twp., Philadelphia County, where he was a miller.Form of name subsequently used was Kephart or Capehart. When the British captured Philadelphia in 1777, he and his son Andrew went to the Cumberland Valley, where they both served in the militia. Children:

    (a) Rachel, born 1749; married John Strub (Stroup), a distant cousin, on April 11, 1768. Resided in Philadelphia. Issue.

    (b) John Kephart, born Feb. 13, 1751; married Elizabeth Fretz, of Bucks County, in 1779; served in German Regiment of Continental Army. Owned a plantation first in Montgomery County and after 1800 another of 140 acres south of New Britain, Bucks County. Builder and first pastor of Mennonite Church, Doylestown. Died Aug. 31, 1822. Issue; the writer's line. See The Compendium of American Genealogy, vol. 7, pages 257 et seq.

    (c) Jacob Kephart, born about 1753; married Susanna Born (Burn) about 1781. May have lived first in Northumberland County, Pa., and possibly later in Belmont County, Ohio. Served in German Regiment of Continental Army. Issue.

    (d) Andrew Kephart (later Capehart), born 1754; married Elizabeth Wright on December 4, 1788. Served in Cumberland County militia. Lived in Frankford, Philadelphia. Contracting carter. Issue.

    (e) Henry Kephart, born 1756.

    (f) Christina Capehart, born about 1756; married Lieut. John Whitehead on May 19, 1776. Resided in Philadelphia.

    (g) George Kephart (also Capehart), born about 1758; may have married a Beckley or Flower; served in Philadelphia militia.

    (h) Katherine (or Catherine) Capehart, born about 1760: married Corporal John Organ on July 17, 1783. May have gone to Westmoreland County.

    (i) Barbara Capehart, born about 1765; married Robert McAll on September 3, 1791. No further data.

    (j) Mary Capehart, born about 1769; married Benjamin Pike on May 29, 1792. No further data.

    (k) Fredrick, born 1774, died 1793.

    (l) Elizabeth Capehart, born about 1772; married John Merkens in 1796 and died in 1829. They lived in Bristol twp.,Bucks County. Eleven children; eldest, Mary Ann, born August 24, 1797, married Thomas Terry, of a family of southern New Jersey (Dividing Creek Baptist Church, Cumberland County), and some of their descendants were in the Mormon colony that migrated to Utah.

    (It is doubtful whether a William Capehart and a Frederick Capehart, shown in the records, both probably unmarried, were of this family.)

    (II) HANS JACOB GEBHARDT (1727 North Baden, Germany-c. 1800 Shenandoah Valle, VA), arrived at Philadelphia on the ship Richard and Mary on September 26, 1752, and settled in Lancaster (now a part of Lebanon) County. Under date of May 10, 1756, he was a member of Vincent and Pikeland Association, a military organization of those two townships against Indians. Wife's name not known. Moved to Shenandoah Valley, Va., but all of their children went about 1784 to Henry and other counties in Kentucky, where they at first lived in forts for protection against the Indians.Children, all of whom used the Kephart form of the name:

    (a) Frances, born about 1753 PA.

    (b) Hans Jacob, Jr., born about 1754 (or 1757) Lancaster, PA, died 27 Jan 1808 Henry Co., Ky; married Mary Hensel of Lancaster County; issue in Kentucky.

    (c) Charles, born about 1756 (or 1759) PA; married Dorothy Hensel, daughter of Philip, in Augusta County, Va. Moved from Shelby County, Ky., to Johnson County, Md., where they left descendants.

    (d) Daughter (Polly), born about 1758 (or 1761); married Myers (or Jacob Mayers); lived near Danville, Boyle County,Ky.

    (e) Henry, born about 1761 PA, died 1841 Henry Co., Ky;

    (f) Daughter (Katherine), born about 1764; married Hoffman (or Huffman) and lived near Danville, Ky.

    (g) Abraham, born 1766, died 1863; married Rebecca Thorn in Shelby County on March 18, 1796; said to have served in Revolution under General Wayne. Some descendants named Head lived in Louisville, Ky.

    (h) John, born about 1768; married ; left a son named Adam, who is said to have died without descendants.

    (i) Barbara, born about 1770; probably the person of this name who married Jacob Telford in Augusta County, Va., on February 2, 1791. No further data.

    (III) DAVID ANDREAS GEBHARDT (born Nov. 17, 1729, died June 5, 1792), arrived as a single man at Philadelphia on the ship John and Elizabeth on Nov. 7, 1754, and about 1756 married Elizabeth Hahn, who was born Feb. 10, 1734, June 22, 1814. On April 21, 1762, he purchased a plantation just north of Chalfont, Bucks County, which he sold on April 9, 1777, after they apparently had gone to Mount Bethel twp., Northampton County. In 1782 he purchased land in Frederick (later Carroll) County, Maryland, and his son subsequently developed a 477-acre plantation known as Brick Mills, on Big Pipe Creek, between Uniontown and Taneytown, on which a mill was operated. Children:

    (a) Andrew Kephart, born about 1757: went to Hunterdon County, New Jersey, where he married Rachel Everitt,daughter of Samuel Everitt, of Everittstown, and died in 1845. Issue.

    (b) Mary Kephart, born about 1759; married Peter Peppel (Pepple) in present Carroll County, Md. Issue.

    (c) Catherine Kephart, born about 1761; married John Hobleman. Issue.

    (d) David Kephart, Jr., born Nov. 12, 1763. died 1836; on Oct. 17, 1802, married Margaret Reister of Reisterstown family. One of organizers of Carroll County and first constable of Taneytown district. Issue.

    (e) Solomon Kephart, born March 3, 1766, died Jan. 30, 1806, on Nov. 12. 1793, married Catherine Warner, born March16, 1769, died July. 1885. Issue.

    (f) Judith, born about 1770; on July 31. 1799, married Henry Grove at Frederick. Issue.

    (g) Abraham, born about 1772; was in Lancaster (now Adams) County, Pa., in 1797; married and may have moved back to Maryland, as one son David was born at or near Baltimore on April 8, 1799. The latter's parents died when he was young and it is not known how many other children were born. David married Mahala Zentz (or Sense) at Baltimore and their children were David, Asa, Emanuel, Margaret Rachel, Mahala, and William. They moved to Pittsburgh, Pa., and the parents and two children later went to Pepin, Wis., where the former died.

    (h) Sarah, born about 1774; on July 25, 1794, married Wendell (Wendle) Trout at Frederick. Issue.

    (IV) NICOLAUS GERHARDT (c. 1733-1829), arrived as a single young man at Philadelphia on the ship Two Brothers on October 13, 1747, and about 1768 married Mary Frey, of later Lehigh County. They settled in Lower Macungie twp.,Lehigh County. He served in the militia in the Revolution. The form Gebhart may have continued in the family of the elder two sons, but that of Kephart was used by the later sons. About 1800, the parents and younger children moved to Center (now Clearfield) County. Children:

    (a) Christina, born about 1769; no further data.

    (b) Daniel, born about 1771; on Nov. 29, 1795, married Elizabeth Rauch. Issue.

    (c) Abraham, born about 1773; both he and his brother Daniel were shown in assessor's records as Gebhard in 1812;no further data.

    (d) Henry Kephart, born about 1777, died Feb., 1858: on Sept. 10, 1797, married Catherine Smith, and with his parents went to Decatur twp. in the present Clearfield County, in the region of Philipsburg and Osceola Mills. Issue. (Mount Kephart, in Great Smoky Mountains Park, was named for Dr. Horace Kephart, the author, a descendant of this couple.He conceived and successfully worked for the establishment of this great national playground. At least three of the colonial pioneers had eminent descendants.)

    (e) Andrew, born about 1780; married Catherine Weiser; Clearfield County.

    (f) George, born about 1783; married ; Clearfleld County.

    (g) Mary, born about 1785; no further data.

    (h) Elizabeth, born about 1789; no further data.

    (i) Catherine, horn 1793; married Panzer (Pentzer) and died in 1883.

    The article above was transcribed from "The National Genealogical Society Quarterly" Volume 31, Page 53-64. Some additions have been made from data gathered online. The original un-edited article can be found in the text format at FamilyTree/special/ngsq-00.txt



    They left their mark, Kephart chronicled Smokies

    A mountain is named for Horace Kephart (b.1862 - d.1931), the writer and naturalist, born in 1862, who worked for years on the North Carolina side of the mountains to make the Park a reality.

    Kephart's life story is the stuff of legends. An Ivy League scholar, historian, world traveler, linguist, and librarian, Kephart was guardian over one of the most extensive bodies of literature in existence concerning the Western frontier, when he headed the prestigious St. Louis Mercantile Library.

    Successful, respected, and the head of a happy household, Kephart appeared to have everything a scholar would want.Something was wrong, however. In 1904 he left his post at the library, his home, and his wife - in short, the whole"blessed rut" as he once referred to his life in Missouri, to take up a life of wandering in the Smoky Mountains.

    Woodcraft was his specialty, and he made a name for himself with the publication of "Camping and Woodcraft" in 1906.

    ISBN 0-87049-551-8 (cloth:alk. paper)
    ISBN 0-87049-556-9 (pbk.:alk. paper)
    Camping and Woodcraft - Forward
    Camping and Woodcraft - Forward End Notes.

    He became friends with the mountaineers and chronicled their days and ways in "Our Southern Highlanders," a sympathetic study of the folkways of people known to most people as "hillbillies".

    In 1913, Kephart made his home in Bryson City where he devoted his energies to the establishment of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Kephart died in the lands he chronicled and worked to preserve in a Bryson City, N.C.automobile accident in 1931, but not before climbing and taking the measure of Mt. Kephart, named in his honor.

    The above article was transcribed from "The Mountain Visitor" June 25, 1984 Sect. A, page 14.

    It is believed that the Kephart family came to Philadelphia, PA, from Switzerland between 1750 and 1765. (William?) Henry Kephart was born in Pennsylvania in 1790 and married Mary Charlton (born circa 1798/9, VA) in 1813. He left Pennsylvania by way of Kentucky on his way to Tennessee. The 1830 census shows him living in Dickson County, TN.

    He apparently owned land early on, around the mouth of Jones' Creek near its entrance to the Harpeth River. Recorded in Deed Book F, page 164, March 28, 1833, Henry Kephart deeded "for the natural love and affection he has and bequeath to the Cumberland Presbyterian Methodist Church as also for the better maintenance support and encouragement of Religion and education, hath given...(to the) Trustees (of said church) a meeting house on the premises of said Henry Kephart including one acre of ground".

    Before arriving in Tennessee, a son, William (Henry?) Kephart, was born in Kentucky, circa 1817. On Oct. 24, 1839, in Dickson County, TN, he apparently married Mary Ann Joslin. It is believed that this marriage had at least five issues:Nancy Diana (born 1841), Caleb Montgomery "Mont" (born 1844), Mary (born 1846), H. Perry (born 1851) and William Richard "Billy" (born July 27, 1862).

    As a growing teenager, Billy Kephart was living with his older brother in 1880. The census shows both "Billy" and his mother, Mary Ann, living with Caleb Montgomery Kephart's family in Dickson County, TN.

    On July 27, 1884, his birthday, William Richard Kephart and Martha Jane Allbert were married by R.V.Bowker, J.P.,Dickson County, District 14, in the area since called "Nosegay" up on the ridge road, south of the old Parker place on Jones Creek. This area of Tennessee was noted for timbering, iron forges and furnaces. Earlier the Kephart family had owned and operated two iron forges on Jones Creek. One site can be seen at the bluff across from the old Parker place.The old iron kettle remains in the creek bed today.

    William Richard and Martha Jane Albert Kephart had a large and close knit family group. Mary A. (Sept 16, 1886 - Aug 7.1953) married William James Goodman. Rena (Jan 19 1889 - Nov 17 1953), married D. Boyd Farmer, Dec 25, 1903.Florence (Dec 1891), married Alice Izora Spann, Jul 23, 1916. Ada (Jul 1896), married Frank Young. Cora Lee (Feb 1900 - Jun 1936), married Gene Story. All of the above marriages were in Dickson County, TN.

    Continuing the family: Henry (Oct 10, 1902 - Dec 16, 1974), married Julia McCorkle, June 21, 1928, in Florence, AL.Dock (Jul 7, 1905 - Dec 11, 1984), married Dicie Metheny, April 22, 1928. Gertha May (May 25, 1912 - Feb 27, 1918),buried in Milan Cemetery, Hickman County, TN.

    William (Billy) Richard Kephart and many on his sons-in-law worked in timbering, sawmills and stave mills in Dickson and Williamson County, in the South Harpeth River area. This area (around Linton, TN) in the southwest corner of Williamson County, was the last place of residence before the entire family (except Mary and Jim Goodman) moved to Wayne County in early 1918. The attraction appeared to be the availability of work around Collinwood, and in particular at Three Churches, on Indian Creek. They all, apparently, worked in this area and most, at one time or another, at the stave mill(a part of the Three Churches complex).

    Young Doc Kephart helped Dr Yeiser take care of the sick and dying in the community during the 1918 flu epidemic. He attended the school at Three Churches and also worked at the stave mill, as did his father.

    The 1920 census shows all children of William Richard and Martha Allbert Kephart in Wayne County, except daughter,Mary Goodman, and son, James (Jim) Kephart. Rena Kephart Farmer and husband, D. Boyd Farmer, were now living in Collinwood. Florence and Lee Cook's second son, Earnest Charlie Cook, was born at Three Churches, Aug 23, 1922.

    In the early 1920's, several family members moved from Indian Creek. The Cook family moved to New Market, AL and later to Huntland, AL. The Story family moved back to Dickson County. The Young family moved to McMinnville, TN and in 1928 to Chapel Hill, TN, where their descendants remain today. William James (Jim) Kephart's family had moved back to Dickson County in 1919, but returned to Collinwood in 1929 where a large family of descendants live today. He is buried in McGlamery Cemetery at Collinwood.

    By 1923, Mr and Mrs Billy Kephart and sons, Henry and Dock, had also moved from Indian Creek to Collinwood at the Greenwood subdivision. Energetic young Henry, soon gravitated to the Tri-cities area of Alabama where gainful and interesting work was obtained on the Wilson Dam.

    In the early 30's, Rena Kephart Farmer moved her family, including her mother and father (the Kepharts), brother Dock with wife Dicie, to the family farm on Little Shawnetee. In 1933, she purchased another farm at McCall's and housed her parents there.

    In the mid-30's, son Henry lived in Cloverdale, AL, with wife, Julia McCorkle. They had one child, a daughter, Allene.They built a small cottage in their yard for "Billy" and Martha to live quietly nearby. Dock and Dicie Kephart Joined Henry and Julia in Cloverdale. Dock and Dicie were childless, but generously provided nourishing love to many children in the extended family.

    Jim and Alice Kephart's family of 10 children have all lived in Wayne County, four having been born there: William Jasper(Apr 28, 1916 Dickson County); Willie Lee (Sept 15, 1918 Wayne County - July 20, 1919); Pauline Elizabeth (Dec 19,1919 Dickson County - Nov 6, 1950), married (?) Brewer; James Richard (born Oct 21, 1921 Dickson County), lives in Collinwood; Johnnie Edward (born Feb 17, 1923 Dickson County), lives in Indiana; Georgia Frances (born May 20, 1925 Dickson County), lives in Collinwood; Nathan Bailey (born Aug 9, 1927 Dickson County), lives in Collinwood; Alex Keith (born Jan 21, 1930 Wayne County), married Betty Joeline O'Guin, May 2, 1948, lives in New Johnsonville, Humphreys County; Montie Irene (May 26, 1932 Wayne County; and William Jim (Apr 19, 1934 Wayne County - May 6, 1941).Three sons, Richard, Johnnie and Alex served in the military during World War II.

    A branch of the Kephart family also settled in North Alabama around 1915. That was "Billy" Kephart's first cousin, Benjamin Franklin "Bink" Kephart, who was also from Dickson County. Many descendants remain in the Alabama Quad-City area.

    The Kephart name apparently harks back to the early days of the Norsemen of early Europe. Over the centuries, they kept pushing southward through Germany and into Switzerland. Then "America, the Land of the Free" beckoned.

    The above article was transcribed from "Wayne County, Tennessee - History and Families" Turner Publishing Company Paducah, Kentucky.
  • Change Date: 28 FEB 2010



    Marriage 1 Catherine (--?--)
      Children
      1. Has No Children Jacob KEPHART b: 6 SEP 1771 in Frederick County, Maryland c: 27 OCT 1771 in Frederick County, Maryland
      2. Has No Children Cathrina KEPHART b: 25 NOV 1773 in Frederick County, Maryland c: 28 NOV 1773 in Frederick County, Maryland
      3. Has No Children Henry KEPHART b: 26 JUL 1778 in Frederick County, Maryland

      Marriage 2 Susanna LIEPLEY b: 19 JUN 1761 in Frederick County, Maryland
      • Married: 7 AUG 1782 in Frederick County, Maryland 1
      • Note:

        The Kephart Story

        The article below was transcribed from "The National Genealogical Society Quarterly" Volume 31, Page 53-64. Some additions have been made from data gathered online. The original unedited article can be found in the text format at FamilyTree/special/ngsq-00.txt. .

        A Danish Royal-Skiöldung Lineage Gebhardt (Kephart, Capehart) and Zincke (Zingge) Descendants of Lords of Erlach By Lt. Col. CALVIN I. KEPHART, ARLINGTON, VA.

        It is a genealogical rarity to discover among the people of certain European countries and the United States today seemingly numerous descendants of an ancient royal family in the direct male line. The family hereinafter discussed apparently represents the oldest and proudest royal stock of all Europe, namely, the ancient Danish royal Skiöldung dynasty of prior to the year 1000, which traditionally descended from Odin and his wife Frigga. The facts down to a certain time are readily provable by such important works as the poem Beowulf, the various sagas and eddas, early Frankish history, the Annals of Fulda, the Chronicle of Abbot Regino of Pruini, the writings of other early religious personages, Viking and other histories, the history of Saxo Grammaticus, the writings of Sir W W. Howorth in Transactions of the Royal Historical Society (England), and, among others, the recent article (1927) on Rurik, founder of the Russian state, by Colonel N. T. Belaiew in the Saga-Book of the Viking Society of London. Then a gap occurs,followed by a series of significant facts, extending over several centuries, that cannot well be decried.

        Odin is said to have led the Danes westward across Europe to the mouth of the Elbe River about 514 B.C. There he conquered far and wide and then moved northerly into the so-called Cimbric Chersonesus (or peninsula), later known as Denmark. He traditionally divided the conquered territory among his sons, that just east of the Elbe River going to Vegdeg and Balder, that along the Rhine river going to Sigge (from whom the Sigambri apparently took their name), and the Danish peninsula going to Skiöldr, from whom the royal family of the last-named country took its name.

        Upon his death, Odin traditionally was buried at the site of the present city of Odinse (Odense - see D-7 on map), on the island of Fünen (Fyn), Denmark, and his son Skiöldr then succeeded him on the Danish throne. Because of his prowess and wisdom, Odin was deified by his followers, as was common in those times. The line of his son Skiöldr (Scyld),including certain kings named in the epic poem Beowulf, continued on the Danish throne in the direct male line, with occasional exceptions, down to A.D.827. During those exceptional periods, the occupant of the throne usually was a descendant of that dynasty in a female line until the time of Godfred, 808-810, when it was usurped by this member of the renowned rival Yngling family. Strangely, he was one of Denmark's most eminent kings and law-givers and ranks with her earlier great kings, such as Ivar Vidfadme and Harald Hildetand.

        The death of the Yngling king Godfred in 810 was the signal for the outburst of serious dynastical strife between his Sons and the legitimate Skiöldung claimants to the Danish throne. Godfred's eldest daughter had married Halfdan (c.755-810), the rightful Skiöldung claimant, who was underking of Zealand. Halfdan was a son of the Danish King Harald, son of another Halfdan and grandson of Harald Hildetand. He ruled about 750 to 770, when he was succeeded by an illustrious cousin, King Wermund of Jutland, who, like his predecessor, was a descendant of Harald Hildetand. The later Halfdan is conspicuous in history as an envoy of his father-in-law, King Godfred, to a convention called by Charlemagne in 782 and as the first Christian of the North.

        This Halfdan's children were Anilo, Harald (Klak), Reginfred, Roerek (Rorik), Hemming, Eric, and several daughters.Upon the slaying of Godfred's son Hemming (king from 810 to 813), who agreed with the Franks upon the Eider River as the boundary between the two nations, and the slaying of Halfdan's son Anilo later the same year, the latter's brothers Harald (underking of Schleswig - see C-1 on map of Germany) and Reginfred were selected as joint kings and their brother Roerek was appointed as underking of Jutland. Reginfred was slain in another dynastic feud in 814, after which Harald occupied the throne alone. He was one of the most romantic, though rather unfortunate, characters of that early time. He was born about 782 and inherited the best blood of both the Skiöldung and the Yngling lines. He was an ancestor in a female line of the great king of Norway, Harald Haarfager (847-930).

        Harald had an exceedingly difficult task to retain his throne against his maternal uncles and appealed to the Frankish emperors for aid. At Ingelheim, near Mainz, in 826, he, his family, his two brothers Roerek and Hemming, and numerous followers were converted to Christianity in an elaborate ceremony conducted by Emperor Louis I (Louis I, the Pious, was crowned emperor in 813,by Charlemagne himself), at which time the attractiveness of the Rhine Valley was not lost on Harald and his followers,as proved by later invasions of the Vikings. But the Frankish rulers were loath to interfere in the internal affairs of the strong barbarian nation on the north, and in 827 Harald finally was dethroned by his maternal uncle Eric, who succeeded him as King Eric I (sometimes called Horic). The latter was cruel and vindictive and experienced a turbulent reign. He ejected Harald's brothers and their adherents from their offices and confiscated their property. His ascension to the throne marked an important transition in Danish royal history, namely, the termination of the Skiöldung rule in the male line, although Harald had several able Sons as legitimate claimants to the throne, namely, Guthorm, Godfred, Siegfred,Halfdan, and Rudolf. The appellation 'Klak' is said to mean 'complainer' and to have been applied to him because of his dynastic difficulties and endeavors to gain aid to recover his throne.

        However, Harald Klak's appeal to Emperor Louis the Pious was not wholly fruitless, for, as a Christian and the son of a Christian. he was granted a fief consisting of the county of Ruistringen, in East Frisia, between the Ems and the Weser Rivers, fronting on the North Sea and extending southward to Meppen, the Hase River, and Bremen, including most of East Friesland and the present state of Oldenburg. There he was joined by his younger brothers Roerek and Hemming and re-established himself as Count of Ruistringen. But in the possession of this territory he was greatly harassed by his vindictive uncle, King Eric of Denmark, although he succeeded in extending his domain as far south as the present isle of Walcheren, where Hemming was killed in its defence in 837.About 852 Harald was assassinated by the Franks, whereupon his brother Roerek succeeded him as Count of Ruistringen.

        In 854 another Eric, distantly related to Harald in a female line, seized the throne from the Ynglings. He is known as King Eric II (also as Horic). He had married a daughter of Guthorm, Harald's eldest son, who was slain in 854, and upon Eric II's death in 860 he was succeeded by his son Guthorm, and this line has continued on the Danish throne through several female descendants down to the present time.

        In 859 Roerek (otherwise called Rurik) traditionally received a call from the Slavs of the region of Novgorod to come to that country and establish an orderly government among the various contending tribes. He took a large army from Ruistringen and succeeded in that mission, so that by 862 he had become prince of the new Russian state. The rulership of his Frisian domain then passed to Harald's eldest son Godfred, who soon laid plans to enlarge it By 881 he had extended his territory to include practically all of the present Netherlands, where he was known in history alternatively as duke or king of Frisia. In that year he seized the castle or stronghold at Hasloo (now called Elsloo, just north of Maastricht), in the southerly part of Limburg province, where he established a regal villa, protected by a stockade, and made it the seat of his government. In 882, under an agreement with Emperor Charles the Fat, he was again Christianized and married (secondly) Gisela, a daughter of King Lothair II,of the later Lorraine. In 885, in consequence of his demand for wine-growing regions toward Andernach, on the Rhine,apparently promised to him earlier, he was assassinated during a conference with Frankish leaders on Batavia Island and his dukedom of Frisia thereupon vanished.

        Godfred was born about 812 and married about 835 probably a sister of Count Gerolf, of East Frisia, who was his loyal vassal. His children included at least sons named Wermund and Harald (Wurm and Hals, princes of the Danish nation,as stated in the Annals of Fulda). These sons must have continued to reside at the baronial seat of Hasloo while the remnant of their followers settled down as their vassals in the defence of their only remaining domain.Thereupon, they apparently disappeared from written history. These two princes must have been born in Ruistringen about 837 and 840 respectively. Who were their descendants and where did they and their own descendants reside? In the light of their antecedents, we have every reason to believe that they left numerous descendants, who thus represented the royal Skiöldungs in the direct male line. With the exceptions presented below, fortuitously discovered,the names and subsequent habitations of these descendants are unrevealed in history, so far as the writer knows.Because of the paucity of data for the 150 years after the time of Wermund and Harald, this gap in the genealogical chart necessitates our introducing the following family as highly probable descendants of the last-named Wermund, son of Duke Godfred, rather than as actually proved posterity.

        In all probability, for a considerable time, in order for Wermund and Harald to preserve their status in the country against surrounding barons and counts who had been harmed during the raids of the Northmen, they must have sought the aid of powerful religious authorities in the region, such as the bishops of Maastricht or of Liege or the archbishops of Cologne. In fact, some of their sons may promptly have entered church military service in that locality as milites episcopi, i.e., bishop's knights, as northern Lorrraine was the scene of warfare during the whole 10th century. So it is not surprising that we should find that a young nobleman named Hugibert, a scion of Viking leaders, born about 1030 in southern Limburg or nearby territory and bearing the name of the patron saint of hunters (Saint Hugibert or Hubert, a former bishop of Maastricht, 708-727), was engaged through church connections in Limburg and at Würzburg for future service as a bishop's knight in the defence of ecclesiastical real property in Lower Franconia. He seems to have been sent as an esquire to the castle of the eminent Count of Rotenburg-on-the-Tsuber, in Lower Franconia, for training for that vocation. An earlier Count Heinrich of Rotenburg had established several religious foundations at Würzburg and the family was deeply interested in having them protected by knights of unquestionable loyalty, who owed no allegiance to any of the baronial families within the jurisdiction of the Count-Bishop of Würzburg.

        In due time, young Hugibert, well educated and instructed in his future duties, was dubbed a knight by the count. His royal antecedents seemingly made him a desirable husband for one of the count's daughters. Marriages of this type were common in those days. That such a marriage occurred is indicated by the fact that the forename Heinrich, of the Rotenburg family, became an honored name among Hugibert's posterity. About 1055 Count-Bishop Adelbero, a descendant of King Conrad I, granted young Hugibert a fief centering on the village of Schonen-Erlach, now Erlach, about 15 kilometers southeast of Würzburg, in the great bend of the Main River, whereupon his name appears in the records as Hugibert de Erlach. He also was a ministerialis of the count-bishop, probably in a magisterial capacity. He died in 1100. The old moated castle at Erlach, erected about 1105, damaged in the Peasants' Revolt of 1525, and restored in 1545, stands today and is owned and used by the local Roman Catholic Church.

        When we realize that the forename Wermund is found only in the Danish royal Skiöldung family and that, even after 150 years from the time of the above-named sons of Duke Godfred, the names of Wermund, Harald (Herolt), and Godfred (Gottfried) along with that of Heinrich were used generation after generation for two additional centuries by the Erlach family, we may be confident that only male posterity of Wermund, son of Godfred, would have shown such reverence for these forenames of remote ancestors, direct or collateral. The uncommon name of Wermund was less likely to be perpetuated during these 350 years by descendants of Wermund's brother Harald and certainly not by a remotely related or an unrelated family.

        Further evidence of the relation of Hugibert de Erlach to people then living in Lower Lorraine is seen in the fact that his eldest son Heinrich and the latter's son of the same name in 1096 joined the army of Duke Godfrey de Bouillon, mainly from Lower Lorraine, on the First Crusade for the capture of Jerusalem from the Moslems. The last testament of the elder Heinrich, expressing his intention to participate in that adventure, is extant. He was killed at the capture of the Holy City on July 15, 1099, but his son returned, assumed his baronial status, and continued the family. His mother was a daughter of the neighboring Lord de Randersacker, whose lordship was near Würzburg and who also probably was of Danish-Viking ancestry, for the name Randers is that of an extensive region in northeastern Jutland. This fact is additional proof of the selection of descendants of Viking leaders to be bishop's knights at Würzburg and of the line of descent developed here. As surnames became fixed, the Erlach name was carried to other regions,such as southern Germany and Austria, by emigrating younger members of the family.

        The Erlach coat-of-arms, adopted at the siege of Antioch in November, 1097, is as follows: Azure, a fess argent charged with a rose gules. Crest: A fan of peacock plumes natural, haft argent between two horns azure with fess argent. Apparently, the blue field was taken from the banner of Lorraine, the rose was the chief wild-flower of medieval Lower Franconia, the horns were a traditional Viking headpiece, and the fan of peacock plumes is emblematic of adventure in the Near East.

        With this introduction, we shall now set out the genealogical chart of the Erlach family for approximately three centuries,with later branches extending to America. It speaks for itself in further proof of this inference of the family's descent from Duke Godfred. In most instances, the earlier names occur in Latin form in the records.
        CHART OF FAMILY TREE

        Chart 1 begins with Harald Klak (c. 782 - 852) He was King of Schleswig from 803 to 813, King of Denmark from 813 to 827, and Count of Ruistringen from 827 to 852.Chart 2 continues with the descendants of Henricus Cinko A.K.A. Heinrich Zincke (c.1202 - 1265).

        The chart is continued below in the text format and it lists the four brothers (Gebhardt and Gerhardt) that arrived in America.

        (16) JOHANNES GEBHART (c. 1495), innkeeper at The Sonnen, Rheinfelden, as of 1549;

        (17) JACOB GEBHART (c. 1523), vocation not known, Rheinfelden;

        (18) KONRAD GEBHART (c. 1547), ropemaker, went to Basel and became a citizen on September 15, 1569: in 1570 married Anna Nägelin (Nageli);

        (19) JACOB GEBHART (born 1580), ropemaker at Basel; in 1600 married Marie Grenzinger;

        (20) JACOB GEBHART (born 1601), potter at Basel; in 1625 married Magdalena Lienhart;

        (21) HANS KONRAD GEBHART (born 1630, died 1680), furrier at Basel; in 1658 married Katharina Strübin (Strub);

        (22) HANS HEINRICH GEBHART (born 1657, died 1725), furrier at Basel; on January 5, 1696,married Barbara Grünauer, daughter of Abraham and Barbara (Guntzer) Grünauer, of Basel. Was restless,discontented, and slow to settle down, which environment was conducive to the emigration of his children.

        (23) HEINRICH GEBHART (born November 30, 1699), who about 1720 emigrated with at least a second-cousin named Strub down the Rhine Valley to probably the County of Hanau-Munzenberg, in or near the city of Hanau, where they married and reared families. Heinrich's wife was Maria Catharina, daughter of David Andreas and Christina Bernhardt, of a patrician family of Solothurn, Switzerland, and he adopted the Reformed faith, to which her family belonged. The spelling of the name also assumed the form of 'Gebhardt.' If there were other Gebhardt children than the immigrants named below, they are not now known.

        The four brothers who came to America were:

        (I) HEINRICH GEBHARDT (1725-1793), who with his wife (name not known) and two children arrived at Philadelphia on the ship St. Andrew on September 23, 1752, and settled in Bristol twp., Philadelphia County, where he was a miller.Form of name subsequently used was Kephart or Capehart. When the British captured Philadelphia in 1777, he and his son Andrew went to the Cumberland Valley, where they both served in the militia. Children:

        (a) Rachel, born 1749; married John Strub (Stroup), a distant cousin, on April 11, 1768. Resided in Philadelphia. Issue.

        (b) John Kephart, born Feb. 13, 1751; married Elizabeth Fretz, of Bucks County, in 1779; served in German Regiment of Continental Army. Owned a plantation first in Montgomery County and after 1800 another of 140 acres south of New Britain, Bucks County. Builder and first pastor of Mennonite Church, Doylestown. Died Aug. 31, 1822. Issue; the writer's line. See The Compendium of American Genealogy, vol. 7, pages 257 et seq.

        (c) Jacob Kephart, born about 1753; married Susanna Born (Burn) about 1781. May have lived first in Northumberland County, Pa., and possibly later in Belmont County, Ohio. Served in German Regiment of Continental Army. Issue.

        (d) Andrew Kephart (later Capehart), born 1754; married Elizabeth Wright on December 4, 1788. Served in Cumberland County militia. Lived in Frankford, Philadelphia. Contracting carter. Issue.

        (e) Henry Kephart, born 1756.

        (f) Christina Capehart, born about 1756; married Lieut. John Whitehead on May 19, 1776. Resided in Philadelphia.

        (g) George Kephart (also Capehart), born about 1758; may have married a Beckley or Flower; served in Philadelphia militia.

        (h) Katherine (or Catherine) Capehart, born about 1760: married Corporal John Organ on July 17, 1783. May have gone to Westmoreland County.

        (i) Barbara Capehart, born about 1765; married Robert McAll on September 3, 1791. No further data.

        (j) Mary Capehart, born about 1769; married Benjamin Pike on May 29, 1792. No further data.

        (k) Fredrick, born 1774, died 1793.

        (l) Elizabeth Capehart, born about 1772; married John Merkens in 1796 and died in 1829. They lived in Bristol twp.,Bucks County. Eleven children; eldest, Mary Ann, born August 24, 1797, married Thomas Terry, of a family of southern New Jersey (Dividing Creek Baptist Church, Cumberland County), and some of their descendants were in the Mormon colony that migrated to Utah.

        (It is doubtful whether a William Capehart and a Frederick Capehart, shown in the records, both probably unmarried, were of this family.)

        (II) HANS JACOB GEBHARDT (1727 North Baden, Germany-c. 1800 Shenandoah Valle, VA), arrived at Philadelphia on the ship Richard and Mary on September 26, 1752, and settled in Lancaster (now a part of Lebanon) County. Under date of May 10, 1756, he was a member of Vincent and Pikeland Association, a military organization of those two townships against Indians. Wife's name not known. Moved to Shenandoah Valley, Va., but all of their children went about 1784 to Henry and other counties in Kentucky, where they at first lived in forts for protection against the Indians.Children, all of whom used the Kephart form of the name:

        (a) Frances, born about 1753 PA.

        (b) Hans Jacob, Jr., born about 1754 (or 1757) Lancaster, PA, died 27 Jan 1808 Henry Co., Ky; married Mary Hensel of Lancaster County; issue in Kentucky.

        (c) Charles, born about 1756 (or 1759) PA; married Dorothy Hensel, daughter of Philip, in Augusta County, Va. Moved from Shelby County, Ky., to Johnson County, Md., where they left descendants.

        (d) Daughter (Polly), born about 1758 (or 1761); married Myers (or Jacob Mayers); lived near Danville, Boyle County,Ky.

        (e) Henry, born about 1761 PA, died 1841 Henry Co., Ky;

        (f) Daughter (Katherine), born about 1764; married Hoffman (or Huffman) and lived near Danville, Ky.

        (g) Abraham, born 1766, died 1863; married Rebecca Thorn in Shelby County on March 18, 1796; said to have served in Revolution under General Wayne. Some descendants named Head lived in Louisville, Ky.

        (h) John, born about 1768; married ; left a son named Adam, who is said to have died without descendants.

        (i) Barbara, born about 1770; probably the person of this name who married Jacob Telford in Augusta County, Va., on February 2, 1791. No further data.

        (III) DAVID ANDREAS GEBHARDT (born Nov. 17, 1729, died June 5, 1792), arrived as a single man at Philadelphia on the ship John and Elizabeth on Nov. 7, 1754, and about 1756 married Elizabeth Hahn, who was born Feb. 10, 1734, June 22, 1814. On April 21, 1762, he purchased a plantation just north of Chalfont, Bucks County, which he sold on April 9, 1777, after they apparently had gone to Mount Bethel twp., Northampton County. In 1782 he purchased land in Frederick (later Carroll) County, Maryland, and his son subsequently developed a 477-acre plantation known as Brick Mills, on Big Pipe Creek, between Uniontown and Taneytown, on which a mill was operated. Children:

        (a) Andrew Kephart, born about 1757: went to Hunterdon County, New Jersey, where he married Rachel Everitt,daughter of Samuel Everitt, of Everittstown, and died in 1845. Issue.

        (b) Mary Kephart, born about 1759; married Peter Peppel (Pepple) in present Carroll County, Md. Issue.

        (c) Catherine Kephart, born about 1761; married John Hobleman. Issue.

        (d) David Kephart, Jr., born Nov. 12, 1763. died 1836; on Oct. 17, 1802, married Margaret Reister of Reisterstown family. One of organizers of Carroll County and first constable of Taneytown district. Issue.

        (e) Solomon Kephart, born March 3, 1766, died Jan. 30, 1806, on Nov. 12. 1793, married Catherine Warner, born March16, 1769, died July. 1885. Issue.

        (f) Judith, born about 1770; on July 31. 1799, married Henry Grove at Frederick. Issue.

        (g) Abraham, born about 1772; was in Lancaster (now Adams) County, Pa., in 1797; married and may have moved back to Maryland, as one son David was born at or near Baltimore on April 8, 1799. The latter's parents died when he was young and it is not known how many other children were born. David married Mahala Zentz (or Sense) at Baltimore and their children were David, Asa, Emanuel, Margaret Rachel, Mahala, and William. They moved to Pittsburgh, Pa., and the parents and two children later went to Pepin, Wis., where the former died.

        (h) Sarah, born about 1774; on July 25, 1794, married Wendell (Wendle) Trout at Frederick. Issue.

        (IV) NICOLAUS GERHARDT (c. 1733-1829), arrived as a single young man at Philadelphia on the ship Two Brothers on October 13, 1747, and about 1768 married Mary Frey, of later Lehigh County. They settled in Lower Macungie twp.,Lehigh County. He served in the militia in the Revolution. The form Gebhart may have continued in the family of the elder two sons, but that of Kephart was used by the later sons. About 1800, the parents and younger children moved to Center (now Clearfield) County. Children:

        (a) Christina, born about 1769; no further data.

        (b) Daniel, born about 1771; on Nov. 29, 1795, married Elizabeth Rauch. Issue.

        (c) Abraham, born about 1773; both he and his brother Daniel were shown in assessor's records as Gebhard in 1812;no further data.

        (d) Henry Kephart, born about 1777, died Feb., 1858: on Sept. 10, 1797, married Catherine Smith, and with his parents went to Decatur twp. in the present Clearfield County, in the region of Philipsburg and Osceola Mills. Issue. (Mount Kephart, in Great Smoky Mountains Park, was named for Dr. Horace Kephart, the author, a descendant of this couple.He conceived and successfully worked for the establishment of this great national playground. At least three of the colonial pioneers had eminent descendants.)

        (e) Andrew, born about 1780; married Catherine Weiser; Clearfield County.

        (f) George, born about 1783; married ; Clearfleld County.

        (g) Mary, born about 1785; no further data.

        (h) Elizabeth, born about 1789; no further data.

        (i) Catherine, horn 1793; married Panzer (Pentzer) and died in 1883.

        The article above was transcribed from "The National Genealogical Society Quarterly" Volume 31, Page 53-64. Some additions have been made from data gathered online. The original un-edited article can be found in the text format at FamilyTree/special/ngsq-00.txt



        They left their mark, Kephart chronicled Smokies

        A mountain is named for Horace Kephart (b.1862 - d.1931), the writer and naturalist, born in 1862, who worked for years on the North Carolina side of the mountains to make the Park a reality.

        Kephart's life story is the stuff of legends. An Ivy League scholar, historian, world traveler, linguist, and librarian, Kephart was guardian over one of the most extensive bodies of literature in existence concerning the Western frontier, when he headed the prestigious St. Louis Mercantile Library.

        Successful, respected, and the head of a happy household, Kephart appeared to have everything a scholar would want.Something was wrong, however. In 1904 he left his post at the library, his home, and his wife - in short, the whole"blessed rut" as he once referred to his life in Missouri, to take up a life of wandering in the Smoky Mountains.

        Woodcraft was his specialty, and he made a name for himself with the publication of "Camping and Woodcraft" in 1906.

        ISBN 0-87049-551-8 (cloth:alk. paper)
        ISBN 0-87049-556-9 (pbk.:alk. paper)
        Camping and Woodcraft - Forward
        Camping and Woodcraft - Forward End Notes.

        He became friends with the mountaineers and chronicled their days and ways in "Our Southern Highlanders," a sympathetic study of the folkways of people known to most people as "hillbillies".

        In 1913, Kephart made his home in Bryson City where he devoted his energies to the establishment of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Kephart died in the lands he chronicled and worked to preserve in a Bryson City, N.C.automobile accident in 1931, but not before climbing and taking the measure of Mt. Kephart, named in his honor.

        The above article was transcribed from "The Mountain Visitor" June 25, 1984 Sect. A, page 14.

        It is believed that the Kephart family came to Philadelphia, PA, from Switzerland between 1750 and 1765. (William?) Henry Kephart was born in Pennsylvania in 1790 and married Mary Charlton (born circa 1798/9, VA) in 1813. He left Pennsylvania by way of Kentucky on his way to Tennessee. The 1830 census shows him living in Dickson County, TN.

        He apparently owned land early on, around the mouth of Jones' Creek near its entrance to the Harpeth River. Recorded in Deed Book F, page 164, March 28, 1833, Henry Kephart deeded "for the natural love and affection he has and bequeath to the Cumberland Presbyterian Methodist Church as also for the better maintenance support and encouragement of Religion and education, hath given...(to the) Trustees (of said church) a meeting house on the premises of said Henry Kephart including one acre of ground".

        Before arriving in Tennessee, a son, William (Henry?) Kephart, was born in Kentucky, circa 1817. On Oct. 24, 1839, in Dickson County, TN, he apparently married Mary Ann Joslin. It is believed that this marriage had at least five issues:Nancy Diana (born 1841), Caleb Montgomery "Mont" (born 1844), Mary (born 1846), H. Perry (born 1851) and William Richard "Billy" (born July 27, 1862).

        As a growing teenager, Billy Kephart was living with his older brother in 1880. The census shows both "Billy" and his mother, Mary Ann, living with Caleb Montgomery Kephart's family in Dickson County, TN.

        On July 27, 1884, his birthday, William Richard Kephart and Martha Jane Allbert were married by R.V.Bowker, J.P.,Dickson County, District 14, in the area since called "Nosegay" up on the ridge road, south of the old Parker place on Jones Creek. This area of Tennessee was noted for timbering, iron forges and furnaces. Earlier the Kephart family had owned and operated two iron forges on Jones Creek. One site can be seen at the bluff across from the old Parker place.The old iron kettle remains in the creek bed today.

        William Richard and Martha Jane Albert Kephart had a large and close knit family group. Mary A. (Sept 16, 1886 - Aug 7.1953) married William James Goodman. Rena (Jan 19 1889 - Nov 17 1953), married D. Boyd Farmer, Dec 25, 1903.Florence (Dec 1891), married Alice Izora Spann, Jul 23, 1916. Ada (Jul 1896), married Frank Young. Cora Lee (Feb 1900 - Jun 1936), married Gene Story. All of the above marriages were in Dickson County, TN.

        Continuing the family: Henry (Oct 10, 1902 - Dec 16, 1974), married Julia McCorkle, June 21, 1928, in Florence, AL.Dock (Jul 7, 1905 - Dec 11, 1984), married Dicie Metheny, April 22, 1928. Gertha May (May 25, 1912 - Feb 27, 1918),buried in Milan Cemetery, Hickman County, TN.

        William (Billy) Richard Kephart and many on his sons-in-law worked in timbering, sawmills and stave mills in Dickson and Williamson County, in the South Harpeth River area. This area (around Linton, TN) in the southwest corner of Williamson County, was the last place of residence before the entire family (except Mary and Jim Goodman) moved to Wayne County in early 1918. The attraction appeared to be the availability of work around Collinwood, and in particular at Three Churches, on Indian Creek. They all, apparently, worked in this area and most, at one time or another, at the stave mill(a part of the Three Churches complex).

        Young Doc Kephart helped Dr Yeiser take care of the sick and dying in the community during the 1918 flu epidemic. He attended the school at Three Churches and also worked at the stave mill, as did his father.

        The 1920 census shows all children of William Richard and Martha Allbert Kephart in Wayne County, except daughter,Mary Goodman, and son, James (Jim) Kephart. Rena Kephart Farmer and husband, D. Boyd Farmer, were now living in Collinwood. Florence and Lee Cook's second son, Earnest Charlie Cook, was born at Three Churches, Aug 23, 1922.

        In the early 1920's, several family members moved from Indian Creek. The Cook family moved to New Market, AL and later to Huntland, AL. The Story family moved back to Dickson County. The Young family moved to McMinnville, TN and in 1928 to Chapel Hill, TN, where their descendants remain today. William James (Jim) Kephart's family had moved back to Dickson County in 1919, but returned to Collinwood in 1929 where a large family of descendants live today. He is buried in McGlamery Cemetery at Collinwood.

        By 1923, Mr and Mrs Billy Kephart and sons, Henry and Dock, had also moved from Indian Creek to Collinwood at the Greenwood subdivision. Energetic young Henry, soon gravitated to the Tri-cities area of Alabama where gainful and interesting work was obtained on the Wilson Dam.

        In the early 30's, Rena Kephart Farmer moved her family, including her mother and father (the Kepharts), brother Dock with wife Dicie, to the family farm on Little Shawnetee. In 1933, she purchased another farm at McCall's and housed her parents there.

        In the mid-30's, son Henry lived in Cloverdale, AL, with wife, Julia McCorkle. They had one child, a daughter, Allene.They built a small cottage in their yard for "Billy" and Martha to live quietly nearby. Dock and Dicie Kephart Joined Henry and Julia in Cloverdale. Dock and Dicie were childless, but generously provided nourishing love to many children in the extended family.

        Jim and Alice Kephart's family of 10 children have all lived in Wayne County, four having been born there: William Jasper(Apr 28, 1916 Dickson County); Willie Lee (Sept 15, 1918 Wayne County - July 20, 1919); Pauline Elizabeth (Dec 19,1919 Dickson County - Nov 6, 1950), married (?) Brewer; James Richard (born Oct 21, 1921 Dickson County), lives in Collinwood; Johnnie Edward (born Feb 17, 1923 Dickson County), lives in Indiana; Georgia Frances (born May 20, 1925 Dickson County), lives in Collinwood; Nathan Bailey (born Aug 9, 1927 Dickson County), lives in Collinwood; Alex Keith (born Jan 21, 1930 Wayne County), married Betty Joeline O'Guin, May 2, 1948, lives in New Johnsonville, Humphreys County; Montie Irene (May 26, 1932 Wayne County; and William Jim (Apr 19, 1934 Wayne County - May 6, 1941).Three sons, Richard, Johnnie and Alex served in the military during World War II.

        A branch of the Kephart family also settled in North Alabama around 1915. That was "Billy" Kephart's first cousin, Benjamin Franklin "Bink" Kephart, who was also from Dickson County. Many descendants remain in the Alabama Quad-City area.

        The Kephart name apparently harks back to the early days of the Norsemen of early Europe. Over the centuries, they kept pushing southward through Germany and into Switzerland. Then "America, the Land of the Free" beckoned.

        The above article was transcribed from "Wayne County, Tennessee - History and Families" Turner Publishing Company Paducah, Kentucky.
      Children
      1. Has Children George KEPHART b: 7 APR 1788
      2. Has Children Peter KEPHART b: 23 NOV 1790 in Frederick County, Maryland
      3. Has No Children John H. KEPHART b: 18 AUG 1793
      4. Has No Children Simon KEPHART b: 3 MAR 1796
      5. Has No Children Infant KEPHART b: JAN 1801 in Frederick County, Maryland

      Sources:
      1. Type: Vital Record
        Title: Maryland Marriages, 1665-1850
        Media: Electronic
        Location: Ancestry.com
        URL: http://www.ancestry.com

    • Index | Descendancy | Register | Download GEDCOM | Public Profile | Add Post-em

      To share information, or report conflicting data, please contact Carolyne KEPHART Gould.
      Use the email address listed with Rootsweb and feel free to use post-em notes to help others.
      Native American Genealogy Helper

      Printer Friendly Version Printer Friendly Version Search Ancestry Search Ancestry Search WorldConnect Search WorldConnect Join Ancestry.com Today! Join Ancestry.com Today!

      WorldConnect Home | WorldConnect Global Search | WorldConnect Help

      RootsWeb.com, Inc. is NOT responsible for the content of the GEDCOMs uploaded through the WorldConnect Program. If you have a problem with a particular entry, please contact the submitter of said entry. You have full control over your GEDCOM. You can change or remove it at any time.