Descendants of Jacob Coy & my many other family connections.This site continues to grow thru many other researchers help..

Entries: 32022    Updated: 2005-02-12 21:19:25 UTC (Sat)    Contact: Connie Coy Rice    Home Page: Jacob Coy Family & all my other connections

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  • ID: I22569
  • Name: Johann Adam COY
  • Sex: M
  • Birth: 30 MAY 1720 in Winterbach,Pfalz,Bayern
  • Birth: ABT 1718 in Germany
  • Birth: ABT 1720
  • Birth: 30 MAY 1720 in Palentine area of the Rhine-Germany
  • Birth: 30 MAY 1720 in Rhine River area (Germany/Switzerland)
  • Death: AFT JUL 1761 in At sea (Atlantic)
  • Note:
    There have been no records for this Main couple arriving in America or not-still working ontis piece


    All of the below childrens birthdates, are actually their Christening dates found on the LDS site

    David Coy's Genealogy Page
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------- ------

    256) Johann Adam Coy Sr. and wife Maria Appollonia Pickley
    b. c1720 Germany
    d.abt. 1761 died at sea, and buried in the Atlantic

    The progenitor of my Coy family in America began in north-western Europe of the early 1700's. The area known today as Germany was, at the time, a collection of independent kingdoms known as the Holy Roman Empire. Sometime around 1710 Jacob Coy I and his wife were born in this part of Europe, and sometime around 1730 they were married and began a family. In an 1881 interview with one of the couples great-grandchildren, the family was described as "High Dutch". In America the term "Dutch" was once deraugatoraly used to describe not only people from Holland, but also Germans. The term was a variation of the word "Deutsch" which is the German word for "German". The term "high" referred to the southern mountainous region of the German speaking peoples.

    In abt.1761 the family, consisting of the parents and 7 children, began a migration from Europe to America. During the voyage both parents died and were buried at sea. There are a great number of unanswered questions about the events before, during, and after the voyage. If this family was typical of the times in which they lived these questions can be answered as follows.

    1) Why did Jacob Coy I and his family come to America? During this time in German history the only reason that an entire family would be allowed to leave the kingdom in which they lived was because of religious or political dissidence. This family was involved in the German Reformed or "Dunkard" Church. This congregation was an outgrowth of the LutheranChurch. "Dunkards" took a more literal interpretation of the Bible. The name "Dunkard" came form their practice of immersion, or "dunking" their members during baptism. In the southern Catholic controlled section of the empire where the family originated, the Dunkards were persecuted, not only because they were Protestant, but because they were considered very radical (just as the Puritan Pilgrims had been in England).

    2) How did the parents die? Conditions on ocean going vessels of the mid 1700's were very unsanitary. The odds of a healthy person making the voyage were 50/50 at best. Due to the close quarters of the ships, when a life threatening disease did begin to spread aboard a ship the person almost always died. They died because diseases spread very rapidly, and medical attention was virtually non-existent.

    3) How was this migration financed? Colonial America of the 1750's was deeply in need of families to work the farms and plantations that produced the raw materials traded for finished goods from Europe. Farmers at the time would offer to pay ocean passage, room, board, and education for an entire family in return for a contract of indentured servitude from the father. The contract would last for a pre-determined period of time, usually 5-10 years. If Jacob Coy agreed to such a contract it is unknown. However when the ship carying what remained of Jacob's family arrived in America, the family's possessions were confiscated and the oldest sons were indentured. Whenever a person already under contract died during the voyage it was customary for the oldest sons to fulfill that contract. This leads to the conclusion that the Jacob Coy Sr. had agreed to such a contract.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------------- ------
    see David Coy website;
    http://www.ddc.com/~decoy/gen256.htm#l256
    see Connie Coy Rice website:
    http://connie_coy.tripod.com/coyfamily
    ************************************************************************** *************************
    Descendants of Johann Jacob Coy

    Generation No. 1


    1. JOHANN Adam COY was born Abt. 1720 in Bavaria, Germany, and died abt.1761 in crossing the Atlantic with burial at sea. He married Maria Appollonia Pickley Abt. 1720. She was born Abt. 1720 in Bavaria, Germany, and died 1761 in crossing the Atlantic with burial at sea.

    Notes for JOHANN JACOB COY:
    The following narrative is presented as documentary information regarding the Coy family, considered to be the ancestry of Johann Heinrich (Henry) Coy.
    The Coy family in America history began in northwestern Europe in the early 1700's. The area known today as Germany was at the time a collection of independent kingdoms known as the Holy Roman Empire. During the time period of 1710, Jacob Coy and his wife were born in that area of Europe, married in the time period of the 1730's and began a family. The Coy family was described as "High Dutch," a term referred to the southern mountainous region of the German speaking people.
    During this time in German history, the only reason an entire family would have been allowed to leave the kingdom where they lived would have been for reasons of religious or political dissidence. This Coy family was involved in the German Reformed Church known as "Dunkards." The church, an outgrowth of the Lutheran Church, had a more literal interpretation of the Bible and acquired the name of "Dunkard" due to their practice of immersion or "dunking" their members during baptism. In the Catholic controlled section of the southern part of the Empire where the family originated, the Dunkards were persecuted, not only because they were Protestant, but because they were considered very radical just as the Puritan Pilgrims had been in England.

    In 1757, the family began a migration from Europe to America traveling up the Rhine River area to Rotterdam and boarded a ship headed for the New World of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Their nearly grown children, perhaps five or seven in total, made the long passage with them. While at sea, Jacob and his wife and some of the children died and received a burial at sea.
    Conditions on ocean going vessels in the mid-1700's were very unsanitary. Due to the close quarters of the ships, life threatening diseases spread rapidly; medical attention was virtually non-existent.
    Colonial America of the 1750's was deeply in need of families to work the farms and plantations that produced the raw materials traded for finished goods from Europe. Farmers in America would offer to pay ocean passage, room and board, and education for an entire family in return for a contract of indentured servitude from the father. The contract would last for a pre-determined period of time, usually five to ten years.
    It is not known if Jacob had agreed to such a contract, but when the remainder of the family arrived in America, their possessions were confiscated and the oldest sons were indentured. It was customary for the oldest sons to fulfill the contract if the person under contract died during the voyage. The indenture of the sons would make it apparent that Jacob had agreed to such a contract. Jacob and possibly Henry served their indenture for six years until 1763.
    This excerpt is quoted from The German Immigration Into Pennsylvania Through the Port of Philadelphia 1700-1775, Chapter III: "When both parents died after the voyage was more than half completed, their children, especially when they are young and have nothing to pawn or pay, must stand for their own and their parents' passage, and serve till they are twenty-one years old. When one has served his or her term, he or she is entitled to a new suit of clothes at parting and if it has been so stipulated, a man gets in addition, a horse and a woman and a cow."

    The known siblings to arrive in abt.1761 were Johann Jacob (Jacob II) born in 1739 and Johann Henrich (Henry) born in about 1741, eighteen and sixteen years of age respectively.
    Their may have been a couple sisters, but no information have ever been found for the female lineof COY, expect for the girls that maried a COY (COW/KAU) before 1757.

    *I have several sources that support this very story for the COY family of Jacob b.1739
    *History of Greene Co. by RS Dills, and History of Greene Co by Robinson, as well as History of Greene Co. by Broadstone all relate the same story of the coming of the COY family to America for sons Jacob and Henry.
    2 of Jacob Coy II b.1739- decendants, his own son Jacob III b.1792, and one more Jacob b.1811 re-tell of this very tale to the Xenia,Greene Co. paper and the Defiance Co. newspaper..


    *One of the Kindred researcher believes the ship to have been named the SNOW CHANCE-still finding data about this theory

    The family name was found in recorded documents to be spelled with several different spellings, such as Cowe, Caw, Cow, Kau, Coy. Most people were illiterate and names were spelled as sounded or as others assumed.
    Documentation for this family:

    *Jacob Cow on July 5, 1785 purchased 150 acres of land in Peters Township, Franklin County, Pennsylvania.
    *Jacob Cow is found in the "list of tax tables" in Montgomery Township, Franklin County, Pennsylvania.
    The 1790 Pennsylvania census index lists Jacob Cow and Henry Cow with property in mixed townships (described as townships which changed names).

    Found in the Revolutionary War 1776 Veterans list: Jacob Cow 1st Class 4th Company of Cumberland County, Pennsylvania Militia, commanded by Col. Samuel Culbertson and Captain John Orbinson. Henry Cow is listed as 4th Class with the same company. Records indicated on on July 21, 1781 both Jacob Cow, 1st Class and Henry Cow 4th Class are with Captain John Scott..

    Sourced data to support Jacob and Henry COW/COY as the brothers who fought in the Rev. War together.

    Information provided by David Coy and Connie Coy Rice, descendants of Jacob Coy, brother to Henry Coy.
    http://connie_coy/tripod.com/coyfamilyhistory/
    ************************************************************************** *************************tto be checked
    I have read a ship list with Johannes and Georg Kau, can't find it at this
    time (but think it was 1749). But I did find a Johannes Kow destination
    Phil., PA 1754 9041 p 605 Passenger and Immigration list index Vol 2 H N ist
    edition. Edited by P. William Filbry with Mary K. Meyer, copyright 1981 by
    Gale Research Co.
    I have not check this out in the library yet. Couldn'tfind the info and didn't have time to ask for help at the time. This is from my notes I took in Jun 2001.
    from Susan LoweEntries: 1176 Updated: Tue Aug 12 07:46:05 2003 Contact: karen richards
    http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=:2204051&id=I107937772

    ***************************************************************************************************
    The family may have traveled on the Snow Chance or the Boston-Susan Lowe is still chasing the ship records for this family




    Father: Johann Ludwig "Kau" COY b: ABT 1680 in Biedershausen, Pfalz, Bayern
    Mother: Maria Barbara SCHOEFFERS b: ABT 1682

    Marriage 1 Maria Appollonia PINCKLY b: ABT 1720 in Germany
    • Married: 1 DEC 1740 in Winterbach,Pfalz,Bayern
    • Married: ABT 1738 in Germany
    Children
    1. Has Children Johann Jacob COY b: 27 JUL 1741 in Winterbach,Pfalz,Bayern
    2. Has Children Johann Nicholas COY b: 9 JAN 1743/44 in Winterbach,Pfalz,Bayern
    3. Has Children Johann Ludwig (Lewis) COY b: 15 JAN 1747/48 in Winterbach,Pfalz,Bayern
    4. Has No Children Johann Henrich COY b: 3 NOV 1750 in Winterbach,Pfalz,Bayern
    5. Has No Children Susanna Margaretha COY b: 15 APR 1753 in Winterbach,Pfalz,Bayern
    6. Has No Children Philippy Adam COY b: 23 MAR 1755 in Winterbach,Pfalz,Bayern
    7. Has No Children Anna Appallonia COY b: 13 MAR 1757 in Winterbach,Pfalz,Bayern
    8. Has Children Johann Wolventine "Valentine" COY b: 18 APR 1759 in Winterbach,Pfalz,Bayern
    9. Has No Children Johann Paul COY b: 12 JUL 1761 in Winterbach,Pfalz,Bayern

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