Ancestors of Mayflower Descendant, Robert E. Fitzgerald

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  • ID: I54431
  • Name: Richard SEARS
  • Given Name: Richard
  • Surname: SEARS 1
  • Name: Richard Saeres
  • Given Name: Richard
  • Surname: Saeres 2
  • Name: Richard Sares
  • Given Name: Richard
  • Surname: Sares 2 1
  • Name: Richard SEERES
  • Given Name: Richard
  • Surname: SEERES 2
  • Sex: M
  • Birth: Abt 1612 in Colchester, Essex, England 3
  • Death: 26 Aug 1676 in Yarmouth, Barnstable Co., Massachusetts 4 3 5 1
  • Burial: 26 Aug 1676 Yarmouth Ancient Cemetery, Yarmouth, Barnstable Co., MA 6 7
  • Note: a monument exists; east side reads, "SACRED TO THE MEMORY / OF / RICHARD SEARS / SON OF / JOHN BOURCHIER SEARS / AND MARIA L VAN ECMONS / IN LINEAL DESCENT FROM / RICHARD SEARS OF COLCHESTER / AND AN BOURCHIER KNYVET / HE LANDED AT PLYMOUTH / IN 1630 / MARRIED DOROTHY THACHER / AND DIED IN YARMOUTH / IN 1676"; north side reads, "SACRED TO THE MEMORY / OF KNYVET SEARS / ELDEST SON OF RICHARD SEARS / BORN IN 1635 / MARRIED ELIZABETH DYMOKE / AND DIED IN ENGLAND / IN 1696"; west side reads, "SACRED TO THE MEMORY / OF / PAUL SEARS / SECOND SON OF RICHARD SEARS / BORN IN 1637 / MARRIED DEBORAH WILLARD / AND DIED IN YARMOUTH / IN 1707"; south side reads, "SACRED TO THE MEMORY / OF / SYLAS SEARS / THIRD SON OF RICHARD SEARS / BORN IN 1639 / MARRIED / AND DIED IN YARMOUTH / IN 1697"
  • Ancestral File #: 4JDS-SW
  • Occupation: farmer 8
  • Event: Anecdote
  • Note: Though I have given the commonly held parentage of Richard Sears, Source 57 states that his parentage, place, and date of birth are all unknown, but that he may be the Richard Sevier, son of Richard and Eve (Taylort) Serrys) baptised at Crossscombe co SOmet, Eng'd Mar 30 1605. Crosscombe adjoins Finder, the birthplace of Dorothy Jones, wife of Richard Sares. 2
  • Will: 10 Mar 1667
  • Note: 10(3) 1667 Richard Sares made his will, adding a codicil on 3 Feb 1676. Both documents are signed with his "RS" mark, and the inventory is records in Plymouth Rec Book 3, Part 2, pp 53-55. The will refers to "wife Dorothy, elder" (#273), "eldest son paule Sares" (#17759), "youngest son Sylas Sares" (#268), "daughter Deborah" (#17760), "son-in-law Zachery Padduck" (#17761), and "Ichabod Padduck". 2
  • Event: Birth-Var 1590 England 8
  • Event: Anecdote
  • Note: No gravestones mark the burial places of Richard Sares and his wife. Upright stones did not come in use in England till Queen Elizabeth's reign, and early Plymouth Colony graves were usually marked with a boulder. A boulder exists in the Ancient Sears Burial ground in W Brewster, possibly Richard's stone. A granite monument was erected in the old cemetery in Yarmouth by the Hon David Sears of Boston, popularly supposed to mark Richard's grave, but it may actually mark the grave of Paul Sears (#17759), whose gravestone was removed for that purpose. It is also possible that Paul and his parents were buried together. 2
  • Event: Anecdote
  • Note: He came with the last of the congregation of Leyden, landing at Plymouth 8 May 1630. Tax rates indicate he had a lot of property. In 1643 a company led by him passed through Mattacheese to Scargo Hill, settling in what is now Est Dennis. He came from Leyden with the last 60 of John Robinson's congregation, landing at Plymouth 6 May 1630. He was assessed 9 shillings in corn (1 1/2 bushels) at Plymouth 25 Mar 1633. He was in Marblehead MA (then part of Salem) in 1637, and in 1639 is in Yarmouth as one its founders. In 1643 he is shown in the list of Yarmouth citizens "liable to bear arms". He was made freeman in 1652 and on 7 Jun 1652 was chosen Grand Juryman. On 6 Jun 1660 he was chosen constable, and on 2 Jun 1662 was chosen Representative to the General Court in Plymouth. He built his first house on Quivet Neck and his second a short distance NW of the first. On 23 Nov 1634 he paid 20 pounds to Allis Bradford, widow of Governor William Bradford, for a tract of land at Sesuit. He never achieved the status of "Mr.", being referred to as "goodman Seares". Only the governor, deputy governor, magistrates and assistants, ministers of the gospel, elders of the church, school masters, commissioned officers of the militia, and men of wealth or connected with families of nobility or gentry were entitled to use the prefix "Mr." (pronounced Master), and their wives Mrs. or Mistress. Early in the 19th century the name Sears was pronounced by the family as Say-ers, thus leading to confusion about how it was spelled. Richard Seer is first seen in Plymouth Colony records in the tax list of 25 Mar 1633, when he was 44, in a list of 86 persons assessed 9 shillings in corn, at 6 shillings per bushel, upon one poll. He does not appear in the 1634 tax list or the 1633 list of freemen. He crossed to Marblehead, in MA colony, where his wife Dorothy (#273) had a sister married to Antony Tacher. There he was taxed as a resident in the Salem rate-list for 1 Jan 1637-8; and on 14 Oct 1638 was granted 4 acres where he had formerly planted. Early in 1639 Antony Thacher led a group across the Bay to Cape Cod to settle land called by the Indians "Mattakeese", but which they renamed Yarmouth. Richard Sares and his family went with them, taking up residence on Quivet Neck between Quivet and Sesuit creeks (which became the East precinct of Yarmouth, and is now Dennis). Their daughter Deborah was born in Sep of that year and was possibly the second white child, and the first girl, born in yarmouth (Zachary Rider was the first boy). In 1643 Richard Seeres is on the list of those 16 to 60 able to bear arms (male, able bodies with at least 1 upper and 1 lower tooth to pull the cap off the powder horn). 26 Oct 1647 commissioners on Indian Affairs were appointed to meet at the house of Richard Sares of Yarmouth when he entered a complaint against Nepoytam Sachumus, and Felix, Indians. 2 Oct 1650 with 16 others he reported William Nickerson for slander, with damages set at 100 pounds; and with 17 others John Crow, William Nickerson and Lt William Palmer for trespass, with damages set at 60 pounds. 3 Jun 1652 Richard Seeres was propounded to take up Freedom. 7 Jun 1652 Richard Sares was chosen to serve on the Grand Inquest. 7 Jun 1653 Richard Sares took the Oath of Fiddelyte at Plimouth and ws admitted a Freeman. 1 Mar 1658 Richard Seares was chosen on the committee to levy the church tax. 6 Jun 1660 Richard Sares was chosen Constable. 3 Jun 1662 Richard Saeres was chosen Deputy to the General Court at Plymouth. 23 Nov 1664 Richard Sares, husbandman, bought from Allis Bradford (who signed the deed with her mark) a tract of land at Sesauit for 20 pounds (Plymouth Colony Records of Deeds, Vol 3, Part 1, Page 18). HG Somerby records that Sears lost his right arm while holding a commission in the militia, from a gunshot wound in a 1650 fight with Indians, but he is the sole source of that story. Additionally, had he been commissioned he could have used the title Mr., which he did not. 9 3 2
  • Event: Anecdote
  • Note: Source 188 gives wife's name as Dorothy THACHER vice Dorothy JONES. More research is required. 7
  • _UID: 25A75F5FCF8E426E9EA800F2BA75DD300BD1
  • Change Date: 20 Sep 2014 at 14:55
  • Note:
    Note 1:

    Richard Sears born in England, about 1612; died at Yarmouth, MA, buried 26 Aug. 1676; married Dorothy Jones. A strange pedigree, in part at least concocted by that able genealogist but (alas!) occasional fabricator of illustrious pedigrees, the late Horatio G. Somerby, was given circulation in 1857* when Rev. Edmund H. Sears included it in all innocence in Pictures of the Olden Time. This pedigree was gently but effectively castigated by Samuel Pearce May in 1886 in an article,
    "Some Doubts concerning the Sears Pedigree" published in The new England Historical and Genealogical Register (Vol. 40, pp. 261-268) Four years later, Mr. May brought out an authoritative genealogy of the Sears family. He was taxed at Plymouth, 25 Mar 1633, but seems to have moved soon to Marblehead, then part of Salem, MA, where his brother-in-law, Rev Anthony Thacher, settled in 1635. Early in 1639 he was among those who accompanied Thacher in the settlement of Yarmouth.
    Freeman, 1652; Constable, 1660; Deputy to the Plymouth General Court, 1662. His will makes his "brother Thacher" a trustee of his estate, and Thacher's son John calls Richard Sears "uncle." These terms led formerly to an assumption that his wife Dorothy was a Thacher, but that has been disproved, and it is now accepted that she was a sister of Thacher's second wife, Elizabeth Jones. Their brother, Richard Jones of Dorchester, MA, died intestate, and his widow in the inventory referred to her brother Thacher, and also made Anthony Thacher of Yarmouth a trustee of the estate.
    Samuel Jones, son of Richard, in his will in 1661, made bequests to his six cousins in Yarmouth. Thacher had three children by his second (Jones) wife, and Richard Sears had three children, and that accounts for the six.
    (Savage, Genealogical Dictionary (1862), Vol. 4, p. 46, was misled by the pedigree and "family tradition" to the extent of giving Richard a mythical son, Knyvett.). Also New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, Vol. 42, pp 77-79. !CHILDREN-DEATH-BIOGRAPHY: GENEALOGICAL AND FAMILY HISTORY of SOUTHERN NEW YORK and the HUDSON RIVER VALLEY, Vol. II; 1640-1913; Lewis Historical Publishing Co, 1913; pp 507-510; Brewster, NY Public Library; The several attempts of genealogists to trace the pre- American ancestry of the Sears immigrant have met with many discouraging obstacles and few satisfactory results; while it seems to be pretty well established that the family is one of great antiquity there has always existed a doubt regarding its origin, and there are those who are disposed to place it among the old Holland families and bring forth Dutch intermarriages in support of their reasoning. In these annals no attempt is made to investigate the subject of the origin of the family of the Sears immigrant, for it is not known when or where he was born, and nothing of his parentage, although there are various traditions and vague conclusions regarding his forbears. The family in America is fully strong enough in every material respect to stand forever without the warrant of distinguished pre-American lineage. But in regard to the apparent lack of earlier data the Sears family is only one in the long list of our best colonial families whose history back of the immigrant is unknown, and the absence of definite knowledge of his ancestors is not to be taken as evidence of doubtful or obscure origin, for the simple truth is that it has been found impossible to trace his lineage in the mother country. (I)

    Richard Sears appears in our New England colonial history with the mention of his name in the records of the Plymouth colony tax list in 1633, when he was one of fourty-four persons there assessed nine shillings in corn at six shillings per bushel.
    From Plymouth he soon crossed over to Marblehead, MA, and was taxed there, as shown by the Salem list, in 1637-38. He also had a grant of four acres of land "where he had formerly planted," from which it appears that he may have been in that plantation at some previous time. In 1639 he joined the colonists under Anthony Thacher and went to Cape Cod and founded the town of Yarmouth. His first house was built on Quivet Neck, and afterwards he built another house a short distance to the northwest of his first house there.

    In 1643 the name of Richard Sears appears in the list of inhabitants of Yarmouth "liable to bear arms." He was made freeman in 1652, grand juror in 1652, took the oath of allegiance and fidelity in 1653, was constable in 1660, and representative to the court in Plymouth in 1662. In 1664 Richard Sears, husbandman, purchased for twenty pounds from Allis, widow of Governor William Bradford, a tract of land at Sesuit. He died in August, 1676, and was buried March 19, 1678-79; but it is not certain that she was his only wife, or the mother of all or even any of his children. Indeed, there is a presumption that he was previously married and that his children may have been born of his former wife.
    * See Note 3 below
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Note 2:

    From "History of Old Yarmouth:

    [59]Mr. Richard Sears, who came over with the last of the congregation from Leyden, landed at Plymouth, May 8, 1630. The family was originally of Kent, the ancestor of the American line being Adam Sayer, who died in 1346, possessed of the manor of Hougham, near Rochester. The family was distinguished, both by birth and achievements. Richard, sometimes called "The Pilgrim," was the son of Bouchier Sayer, who married Marie Lamoral, of the illustrious Van Egmond family, of Amsterdam, and the grandson of the John Bouchier Sayer, whose father was deprived of his ancestral rights on account of his constancy to htis religious views during the reign of Henry VIII., and fled to Holland. Richard joined the Scrooby company at Leyden, and upon the death of his father, in 1629, came into possession of a large property, and subsequently accompanied the remnant of the congregation to Plymouth. He has a grant of land at Salem, in 1638, but did not stop there long, if at all. In 1643, he settled in Sesuit, now East Dennis. He was a constable in 1660, Deputy of the Court in 1662, but seldom accepted public employment. He died in 1676, aged 86 years, after a life of great purity and devotion to religious duty. His will and codicil were signed with a mark, which has led some writers to state that he was a military officer, and lost his arm by a gun- shot wound in battle with the Indians in 1650. There seems no foundation for such a statement, in any reliable record of the times, thus his writing was doubtless due to the infirmities of age, as frequently occurred at that period. The accounts of the family of Richard Sears state that he was married to Dorothy Thacher, a sister of Anthony, a statement which has been questioned, but which rests not only upon tradition, but also upon expressions in his will, the testimony of John Thacher, and the record in the family Bible left by Hon. Richard Sears of [60]Chatham, which had been kept for several generations. The same authority has records of the names of the children of Richard Sears, viz: Knyvet, born 1635; Paul, 1637; Silas, 1639; and Deborah. Burke's "Vicissitudes of Families," published in London, in 1863, confirms this record, and gives a narrative of the Sears, which has all the attractions of romance. Knyvet, the elder son, made two trips to, and spent much of his time in England, in the endeavor to recover his family estates. He died there in 1686 at the residence of a relative. His sons Daniel and Richard, were adopted by their uncle Paul and subsequently purchased an estate at Monomoy (Chatham), where they removed in 1710. The name in the old books is written Sayer; he himself wrote it Sares; and his posterity commenced writing it Sears. The family has been distinguished in various professional and business walks.

    Massive granite monuments, in the old burying grounds in Yarmouth and Chatham, erected by a descendant, mark the burial place or Richard Sears, and of his wife and sons.
    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Note 3:

    The first name among the descendants of Adam Sayer found standing at the head of an unbroken line is that of John of Colchester, alderman of that city, a man of wealth and dignity, who died in 1509. He was buried in St. Peter's Church, under the saouth aisle, a mural brass memorial recording, in old English letters, his name and honors. By Elizabeth, his wife, who died in 1530, he had three sons, John, Robert, and George. The eldest of these, John died in 1562. He was buried near his father in St. Peter's Church, under the south aisle, with a similar memorial. He left two sons, Richard and George. The elder of these, Richard was born in Colchester, in 1508. He married Anne Bouchier, daughter of Edmund Knyvet of Ashwelthorpe, county of Norfolk, second son of Sir Edward Knyvet. Richard died in Amsterdam in 1540 leaving only one son, John Bouchier, born 1528, who married Elizabeth, daughter of Sir John Hawkins, the distinguished navigator and admiral, and accompanied his father-in-law in many voyages, He died in Holland, leaving four sons, John Bouchier, Henry, William and Richard. John Bouchier, born 1561, married Marie L. daughter of Phillip Lamoral Van Egmond, of Amsterdam, in 1585, and had Marie L., b. 1587, Ridhard b. 1590, John b. 1592 and Jane Knyvet b. 1596. Hhe died 1629. RICHARD, the pilgrim, and first ancestor here of the American branch, born, 1590, married Dorothy Thacher (See note 1 above), sister of Anthony Thacher, at Plymouth, in 1632.

    Richard was a member of the Plymouth colonial court in 1662, and died 1676. His wife died 1680. They had issue, Knyvet, Paul Silas, and Deborah who married Zachariah Paddock. From Knyvet, born 1635, who married Elizabeth Dymoke, and died 1686, was descended David Sears, of Boston, who died 23 Oct 1816, the father of the present Honorable David Sears. From Pul, born 1637, who married Deborah Willard and died 1707, was Issac, the patriot known in revoluntionary times as "King Sears," and also E. [Edmund] H. Sears, of Wayland, and Rev. Barnas Sears, D.D., president of Brown University.From Silas, born 1639, is descended a numerous posterity, widely scattered. (See annals of the towns.)

    For the above data, we are chiefly indebted to the printed work, "The Olden Times," by Reverand Edmund H. Sears -- private edition.
    10 11 12



    Marriage 1 Dorothy JONES b: 1603 in Dinder, Somerset, England
    • Married: 1638 in Plymouth, Plymouth Co., Massachusetts 8 3 13
    • Change Date: 13 Oct 2011
    Children
    1. Has Children Paul SEARS b: 20 Feb 1637 in Marblehead, Essex Co., Massachusetts
    2. Has Children Sylas SEARS b: Sep 1639 in Yarmouth, Barnstable Co., Massachusetts
    3. Has Children Deborah SEARS b: 16 Sep 1639 in Yarmouth, Barnstable Co., Massachusetts

    Sources:
    1. Abbrev: ASP
      Title: Ancestry of Sarah Palin, Location: n/a, Url: http://www.wargs.com/political/heath.html
      Author: n/a, Compiler: William Addams Reitwiesner
      Publication: 2008
    2. Abbrev: Richard Sears
      Title: Descendants of Richard Sears, Version: hard copy in my files
      Author: Compiler: http://www.searsr.com/richard1/pafg01.htm
    3. Abbrev: MF
      Title: My Family, Location: CD on file
      Author: Roger Almond Cunningham, Compiler: PAF 5
      Publication: 17 Jul 06
    4. Media: Book
      Abbrev: History of Old Yarmouth
      Title: History of Old Yarmouth
      comprising the present towns of Yarmouth and Dennis
      From the Settlement to the Division in 1794 with History of Both Towns to these Times.
      Yarmouth and Dennis.
      From the Settlement to the Division in 1794
      with the History of Both Towns to These Times.
      Author: Charles Francis Swift
      Publication: YarmouthPort:
      Published by the Author,
      1884
      Repository:
        Name: Yarmouth Town Library
        312 Old Main Street
        South Yarmouth, Massachusetts 02664 United States

      Page: 59
      Quality: 3
    5. Abbrev: Yarmouth Ancient
      Title: Cape Cod Cemeteries / Gravestones dated up to 1860 / Part 2 of 3 - Mid Cape / Yarmouth, Dennis, Brewster, Harwich, Chatham: Yarmouth Ancient Cemetery up To 1745, Author Address: rpcarlson@comcast.net, Url: http://www.capecodgravestones.com/yarmouth.html
      Author: R.P. Carlson
      Publication: updated May 2006
      Page: gives year only
      Quality: 3
    6. Media: Tombstone
      Abbrev: Grave Record
      Title: Grave Record
      Quality: 4
    7. Abbrev: Yarmouth Ancient
      Title: Cape Cod Cemeteries / Gravestones dated up to 1860 / Part 2 of 3 - Mid Cape / Yarmouth, Dennis, Brewster, Harwich, Chatham: Yarmouth Ancient Cemetery up To 1745, Author Address: rpcarlson@comcast.net, Url: http://www.capecodgravestones.com/yarmouth.html
      Author: R.P. Carlson
      Publication: updated May 2006
    8. Abbrev: RAC
      Title: Backward through Time (with Anx A and B), File Number: B-1
      Author: Roger A Cunningham
      Publication: 27 Feb 1996
    9. Abbrev: Barnstable Co
      Title: History of Barnstable County, Massachusetts, Document: http://capecodhistory.us/Deyo
      Author: Compiler: Simeon L. Deyo (editor)
      Publication: HW Blake & Co, NY (hard copy in my files), 1890
      Page: p. 475, p. 499
      Quality: 3
    10. Media: Book
      Abbrev: History of Old Yarmouth
      Title: History of Old Yarmouth
      comprising the present towns of Yarmouth and Dennis
      From the Settlement to the Division in 1794 with History of Both Towns to these Times.
      Yarmouth and Dennis.
      From the Settlement to the Division in 1794
      with the History of Both Towns to These Times.
      Author: Charles Francis Swift
      Publication: YarmouthPort:
      Published by the Author,
      1884
      Repository:
        Name: Yarmouth Town Library
        312 Old Main Street
        South Yarmouth, Massachusetts 02664 United States

      Page: 59-60
      Quality: 3
      Note: Note 2
    11. Media: Book
      Abbrev: History of Cape Cod
      Title: History of Cape Cod: The Annals of Barnstable County, Including the District of Mashpee
      Author: Frederick Freeman
      Publication: Boston, MA: Printed for the author by Geo. C. Rand & Avery, s Cornhill. 1860
      Repository:
        Name: Brooksville Public Library
        Brooksville, Maine, 04617

      Page: Vol 1: 138
      Quality: 2
      Note: Note 3
    12. Abbrev: The Ancestry of Thomas Brainerd by Dwight Brainerd
      Title: The Ancestry of Thomas Brainerd by Dwight Brainerd
      Quality: 2
      Note: Note 1
    13. Abbrev: Yarmouth Ancient
      Title: Cape Cod Cemeteries / Gravestones dated up to 1860 / Part 2 of 3 - Mid Cape / Yarmouth, Dennis, Brewster, Harwich, Chatham: Yarmouth Ancient Cemetery up To 1745, Author Address: rpcarlson@comcast.net, Url: http://www.capecodgravestones.com/yarmouth.html
      Author: R.P. Carlson
      Publication: updated May 2006
      Page: no year given
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