Fulgham-Fulghum Family Database

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  • ID: I961
  • _UID: A34D3E8CF8F3412FB2F73FEF2DD7B9BB6451
  • Name: ANTHONY FULGHAM
  • Suffix: , AKA FOLJAMBE; FULJAMES
  • Prefix: CAPT. 1 2
  • Sex: M
  • Birth: ABT 1615 in PITMINSTER, SOMERSETSHIRE
  • Death: OCT 1669 in ISLE OF WIGHT CO, VA, U.S.A
  • Military: CAPTAIN OF MILITIA
  • Religion: ANGLICAN
  • Note: 3 3 3 4 5 3 3 3 1 1 3 3 1 3

    TIMELINE:
    22 Oct 1643: Silvester Thacker & Anthony Fulliamb, 100 acs. Isle of Wight Co. Page 937. Lying upon Pagan Point Bay, E. upon land of Mr. Thomas Davis & S. upon Mr John Mahoone. Trans of 2 pers: John Cockett (Corbett?) & Sarah (Hanah?) Robinson. (As noted, Anthony Fulgham, the immigrant ancestor of the Fulgham Family in America, first appeared in the official records of Virginia in 1643. This date would have placed him in Virginia as early as 1640 since about 3 years were required to ?seat? land proposed to be patented prior to the issuance of the patent. Fulgham?s partner in the 100 acre patent, Silvester Thacker, appears to have been the ?Silvester Thatcher?, aged 21 years, that came over on the Paule of London, Leonard Betts, Master, on July 6, 1635, placing Thacker?s birth year in 1614. It is speculated that Fulgham and Thacker were contemporaries, with Thacker being slightly older based on his name recorded first on the patent. It is inferred that Fulgham?s birth year was 1615.)

    5 Sept 1650: Anthony Fuljam, 500 acs. lyeing on N. side Rappa. Riv., next above the land of George Taylor, (on the south side of the easternmost branch of the Corotoman River), p. 259. Trans. 10 pers.: Stephen Chilton, Anne Venicomb, Hump. Jones, John Boein, George Minery, Owen Middleton, John Godwin, Wm. Bilby, Eliza. Waters, Charles Barcroft, ?the 3rd tyme due for.? (Again, due to the lead time for seating land, the patent date would have placed Anthony Fulgham in what at that time was called Chicacoan Indian Territory, in 1647. In 1648, Anthony Fulgham?s Corotoman land patent was enclosed into Northumberland County and in 1651 it became enclosed into the newly formed Lancaster County.)

    14 May 1653: JOHN WARE, 700 acs. lying upon N. side of Rappa. Riv., beg. upon Clifts Cr. &c, & running S. by E. unto land of Anthony Fulgham. 14 May 1653, p. 17, trans. of 14 pers: Jon. Ware, Senr. twice, Margaret his wife, Fra. Ware, Joh. Ware, junr., Kath. Ware, Tho. Speckman, Magd. Peasly, Tho. Weinne, Hen. Jordan, Edwd. Atwood, Wm Mackenly, Eliz. Day, Anne Crofts. [NOTE: This patent clearly shows the immigration of Counselor John Were, Esq., of Dunsmore, Silverton, Devon, and most of his family, i.e., wife Margaret, sons John, jr., and Francis and daughter Katherine, as early as ca. 1650 to Lancaster Co. Va. It is believed that Anthony Fulgham facilitated their move.]

    4 Feb 1654: Will of Robert Chambers dated 4 Feb 1654 (N.S.) in Lancaster County mentions ?Mr. Fullgham? as a legatee. This indicates that Anthony Fulgham was residing on his Corotoman patent as late as Feb 1654.

    16 Dec 1654: Sylvester Thacher, Gent. of Lancaster County to Anthony Fulgham; 100 acres (whereon said Thatcher formerly lived but now in the tenure of Richard Way.) on Warrisqueak Bay and bounded by Richard Maddison, Nathaniel Jones, John Tomlin and Thomas Jones (formerly belonged to Captain John Moon) and said Fulgham (formerly granted to Mr. Thomas Davis.) Witnesses: Edward Skynner and Robert Bird.

    20 FEB 1662 - CAPT. JOHN WEIR, 1200 acs. Rappa. Co., 20 Feb 1662, p. 90 (579). Upon N. side of Rappa. Riv., 500 acs. at the run next above land of George Taylour; 700 acs. upon Cliffts Cr. & running unto land of Antho. Fullgam. 500 acs. granted to sd. Fullgam, 5 Sept 1650 & assigned to sd. Weir; 700 acs. granted sd. Weir, 14 May 1653. (NOTE: It is reasonable to infer that Anthony Fulgham filed for his patent on 500 acres in ca. 1647 and received it in 1650 while retaining stewardship over it awaiting arrival of John Weir and family in 1650. About 4 Feb 1654 Fulgham appears to have returned to Isle of Wight County. Prior to 20 Feb 1662 Weir concluded their stewardship agreement and was assigned the 500 acres originally patented by Fulgham.)

    28 Jun, 1664: Capt Anthony Fulgham, 1000 acs. Is. of Wight Co., p. 383. On a br. of the Black Water, beg. at S.W., cor. of Mathew Tomlin?s land, running Wly. & c. by a meadow &c. Trans. of 20 pers; Daniell Wilson, his wife, Edd. Atwood, Robt. Cole, Katharine Diamant, Martha Greene, Wm. Lewis, Robt., Edwards, Jno Browne, Jno Fulgham, Anthony Fulgham, Jno Boron, Eliz Day, Joseph Butler, Hen Gough, Jno Whoman, Eliz Barnett (or Barrett), Susan Smith, Tho. St. Jno., Jno Wilson. [Note: Edward Atwood, John Bowen/Boron/Boein, Elizabeth Day, and Katherine Diamant had been headrights for Anthony Fulgham, and others, prior to 1655. Fulgham was in Bristol Gloucester prior to 1655 to arrange indentures for Hester Meene and Katherine Diamant. It is believed that Anthony Fulgham brought over Martha Greene with the same group as Katherine Diamant in about 1650, married her perhaps in Northumberland County, and together they had John and Anthony, Jr. in a colony other than Virginia before migrating to Isle of Wight County in about 1654. Fulgham added to his Pagan River plantation in 1654 through purchase from Sylvester Thacker and then claimed Martha, John and Anthony, Jr. as head rights in the above patent. A curiosity involved with Martha Greene is that she appears to be either the sister, or step-sister of Robert Smith?s wife, Jane Greene. Robert Smith, mariner, lived on the Pagan?s Shore property immediately adjacent to Anthony Fulgham.]

    9 NOV 1664: Daniel Miles, aged 25, being at John Weston?s house in Dec., 1663, Robert Smyth and one of Mr. Fulgham?s sons ran for a passage over the creek not presently ready. 9 Nov., 1664.

    12 Jul 1665: Capt. Anthony Fulgham, 1600 acs. Isle of Wight Co., p. 253. Beg at W. side of a meadow at the head of the W. Branch, running W by Mr. Bodye?s marked trees &c. Trans. of 30 pers: Wm. Bressie, Susan his wife, Eliz Powell, Jno. Trupsha, Ruben Gladill, Jno. Warborton, Richd. Avery, Thomas Walter 8 times, his father & mother, Wm. & Jane Walter, Jno. Holly, Jno. Collins, Richard Bennett, Richd. Seward, Anthony Fulgham, Jno. Fulgham, Joane a Negro, Ann White, Thomas Cheny, Robt. Edwards, Jane Morgan, Mary Harris, Blanch Harding.

    9 Feb 1666: Capt. Anthony Fulgham present att court. He appears to have been appointed an Isle of Wight County Justice some time before this date.

    9 Jun 1666: Acknowledgment by George Dewey (sic., Durant) that he had full satisfaction of Capt. Anthony Fulgham of all est. (sic., estate) of Ann Harwood, orphan, now wife of said Dewey (sic., Durant) and fuly discharge the said An. Fulgham, 9 June, 1666. Teste, Dianah Barnes. [Note: Jno. Harwood and Ann Harwood first appear in Virginia land records on 20 Oct 1661 as headrights of James Kine for 500 acres in Northampton County. Allowing 3 years seating time prior to patent issuance would have placed them in Virginia ca. 1658. It is unclear what the relationship was between Jonathan and Ann Harwood, however, since she was subsequently characterized as an ?orphan?, the inference is drawn that Jonathan was Ann?s father and he deceased prior to 9 June 1666. The final appearance of Jonathan in Virginia land records was as a headright in Col. John Catlett?s patent for 200 acres on the N. side of Rappa. Riv. dated 2 Jun 1666. Allowing 3 years seating time prior to patent issuance would have placed Jonathan?s death at not sooner than ca. 1663. Boddie states that Durant owned land in Northumberland County, Virginia, where he married Ann Marwood (sic., prob. Harwood.) Ann appears in Anthony Branch?s patent for 500 acres in upper parish of Nancimond dated 20 Oct 1665, appearing as An Durant along with her new husband, George Durant. Allowing 3 years seating time prior to patent issuance places Ann and George Durant in Nansimond County ca. 1662, one year prior to her father?s death, therefore, it is inferred that they were married in Northumberland Co. with Jonathan?s permission.]

    OLD NOTES: BODDIE - 3-18-1668 GRANTED 150 ACRES IOW, VA. PATENT BOOK 6 PAGE 215. (100 ACRES ON PAGAN POINT BAY AND 50 ACRES OF MARSH LAND NEXT TO 1ST GRANT ABOVE). CAPT.ANTHONY DIED INTESTATE OCT 1669. ADM REQUESTED BY HIS RELICT, MARTHA - MAY 2, 1670, RECORDED 6-24-1670. SECURITY JOHN FULGHAM AND MICHAEL FULGHAM.

    THE STORY OF CAPTAIN ANTHONY FULGHAM

    By James Grant Fulgham

    In 1638 an Anthony Fuljames married an Elizabeth Norris in Pitminster, Somersetshire; they had three children christened in Pitminster between then and 1643, and then disappeared from the Somerset records. Although the extant Somersetshire records are silent on the origin of this Anthony Fuljames, it is inferred from his approximate age and the chronology and naming of his sons that a descent from John Fuljames of Woodbrooke, Somerset is likely. It is the opinion of your Historian and Archivist that it is likely that the person who later became known as Captain Anthony Fulgham is this mysterious Anthony Fuljames. It is the purpose of this article to tell his story ? with documents when extant, and with inference when necessary.

    ANTHONY FULJAMES OF SOMERSET

    Anthony Fuljames? GG Grandfather, William Fuljames, b. ca. 1490 at Ing?s Manor, Harpenden, Hertfordshire was the first Fuljames to settle in Somersetshire. He was listed as William Fulgeham in the entourage of King Henry VIII in 1520 while at the king?s ?interview? in Guisnes, France.1 In 1535 William Fuljame was plaintiff in a case against the Abbot of Athelney in which the Abbot?s servants illegally entered the plaintiff?s property in Saltmore, Somersetshire.2 These two 16th century examples show the interchangeability of phonetic spelling between Fulgham and Fuljames in official records. With a small amount of inference applied to this, we can see how a Fuljames from Somersetshire can become a Fulgham from Virginia, and vice versa.
    Moving forward to the 17th century, Anthony Fuljames is believed to have been born ca. 1615 in Pitminster, Somersetshire, the middle child out of five that lived, to John and Sarah (Hole) Fuljames. (NOTE: No christening record for Anthony Fuljames has been found; however, we have the Pitminster Church record of Anthony Fuljames? marriage in 1638.3 Sir Edward Anthony Wrigley, a noted Cambridge University historical demographer, provides empirical data for 1560-1646 Colyton, Devon, near Pitminster, Somerset, that suggests the modal age for Colyton male first marriages was 23 years.12 Therefore, it is reasonable to infer that Anthony Fuljames was born in 1615.) John Fuljames was born in Angersleigh Parish, Somerset in ca. 1575 and about the date of his marriage to Sarah Hole in 1603, he acquired Woodbrook Farm in Pitminster, an adjacent parish to Angersleigh, and became known as John Fuljames of Woodbrooke, Gent.4 A Woodbrook Farm remains in operation in Pitminster Parish into the present time although it is unclear if it is the same Woodbrooke that was owned by the Fuljames family. The Hole family from which John Fuljames? wife Sarah came from, originated from Peter Ataller Hole, b. Barnstaple, Devon ca. 1447.5 He flourished there at a time when Barnstaple was the home of many wool merchants and mariners. The Hole family made their home consecutively in Barnstaple, Sandford, and Clannaborough in Devon, and Pitminster in Somerset between pre-1447 and post-1603.
    Following are brief biographies of the five surviving children of John and Sarah Fuljames. The eldest surviving child was Grace, b. Apr. 16093 at Pitminster and married 1635 at Pitminster to Robert Masters of Thornford, Dorset.3 They made their home in Puriton, Somerset and had one son, William b. 1636.3 Both Robert and William Masters were deceased in 1656, perhaps of the plague.3 [Note: The following individuals that were closely associated with the Fuljames family died in 1656 ? Rev. William Cotton, Rector of Silverton, Devon; Katherine (Rawlinson) Cotton, daughter-in-law of Rev. Cotton; Arthur Wichehalse, brother-in-law of Rev. George Westcott of Shobrooke, Devon; Robert and William Masters, brother-in-law and nephew of Anthony Fuljames. Although no death record for Grace (Fuljames) Masters has been found, due to her absence from English records after 1656, it is speculated that she died in 1656 at about the same date as her husband and son.]
    The second surviving child who was the eldest son and heir was John Fuljames, Jr. b. June 1613 in Pitminster who married Prudence Westcott of Shobrooke in 1635 at Shobrooke, Devon. 3 They chose to make their home at Shobrooke and had four children there, one boy and three girls, between 1636 and 1641. John Fuljames experienced an accident, violence or ill health and died at Shobrooke in 1644 aged 31. It is unclear why John chose not to live at Woodbrooke, soon to be his estate; however, there is no indication of a schism between him and his father. Prudence was not mentioned in her mother?s (Mary [Roberts] Westcott) will dated 1665 and is presumed to have deceased prior to that date.6 John and Prudence?s first-born, Mary, lived to the age of nine years and deceased at Shobrooke in 1645.3 The second-born, the son and heir, Thomas, deceased as an infant in 1637.3 The third and fourth-born children, Katherine and Sarah, were mentioned in their grandmother?s 1665 will as co-executors and lived beyond the year 1666, the year in which the will was proved.
    The third surviving child, the subject of this article, was Anthony Fuljames (SEE LATER), b. ca. 1615 in Pitminster and married, first, in 1638 at Pitminster, Elizabeth Norris, b. 1623 in Bridgwater Parish, Somerset, and had three children by her, all born in Pitminster, i.e., John b. 1639, Thomas b. 1641, and Elizabeth b. 1643. [Note: No christening record for Anthony has been found. However, the naming custom of the time was to name the first-born son after his paternal grandfather. Anthony named his first-born son ?John,? therefore, it is reasonable to infer that Anthony?s father was named John. There were only three possible Somersetshire candidates named John in the appropriate time period, two born in High Ham, Somerset and the third being John of Woodbrooke. For John No.1 of High Ham, b. 22 May 1575, no records of marriage, offspring or death have been found, and he is believed to have died young. For John No. 2 of High Ham, b. also in 1575, m. Grace Hole in 1603, no record of offspring or death has been found. This John is believed to have deceased without progeny. Thus, it is the opinion of this author that the father of Anthony Fuljames of Pitminster was John of Woodbrooke. One final minor fact in support of John of Woodbrooke is worthwhile to consider before moving on. It was customary for Anthony and Elizabeth to have named the second son after the child?s maternal grandfather. For reasons lost in antiquity, they chose not to follow the custom for their son, Thomas. He appears to have been named after his paternal great-uncle Thomas, of Angersleigh, brother of John of Woodbrooke. 3 Great-uncle Thomas was still living when infant Thomas? was born in 1641 and Great-uncle Thomas and his wife, Mary, appear to have been childless.]
    The fourth surviving child was Elizabeth, b. 11 June 1621 at Pitminster, married Hugh Bond of Broadway, Somersetshire 14 July 1642 at Pitminster and had one son, Hugh, Jr. b. 6 July 1643 at Pitminster. Elizabeth died at the young age of 22 years in 1644, the same year as her older brother, John. 1644 was the first year of another round of the bubonic plague in Europe and perhaps it found its way to the Bond home. Hugh Bond was descended from William Bond, originally of Buckland-Newton, Dorsetshire, who was one of the Yeomen of the Guard for Henry VIII. In consideration of William?s faithful service, in 1539 the king awarded William the positions of Reeve and Bailiff of Charlton Camville (now Charlton Horethorne), Somersetshire.7 William?s descendants spread out through Somerset and adjacent counties during the next century, with Hugh being born in Broadway, married in Pitminster and deceased in Mark, Somerset.
    The fifth, and final, surviving child for John and Sarah Fuljames was Sarah, b. 21 December, 1624 at Pitminster, married John Cotton of Silverton, Devonshire in 1642 at Pitminster but had no children.3 This marriage is an important clue to the 17C political leanings of the Fuljames of Woodbrooke family, of the subsequent activities of Anthony Fuljames and of the Fuljames-Foljambe family connection. John Cotton?s grandfather was the Right Reverend William Cotton, Bishop of Exeter, d. 1621 and John?s father was Reverend William Cotton, Rector of Silverton, Devonshire, d. 1656. The Cotton family patriarchs were devoted royalists throughout the English Civil War and the senior line of the family was deprived of all of their possessions, both spiritual and temporal, during that period.8 It can be reasonably inferred that the Fuljames family of Woodbrooke shared their royalist loyalty. The marriage placed Anthony Fuljames, now brother-in-law of John Cotton and his siblings, in social contact with Cotton associates, including the Were family of Dunsmore Manor, Silverton Parish, Devonshire. The estates of Counselor John Were/Weare, the head of the Were family in Silverton, and his eldest son, John, Jr., were sequestered in 1648 by Parliament and John, Sr. was fined 526 pounds (about $500,000 today) for being the royalist commissioner of array and for assisting royalist forces. The Reverend William Cotton, Sarah Fuljames?s father-in-law, was Rector of the Were Family?s church in Silverton.10 As the result of parliamentary intimidation, by 1650 Counselor John Were/Weare, his wife Margaret (Dart) Were, John, Jr., Francis, and Katherine had moved to the south side of the eastern branch of the Corotoman River, next to Anthony Fulgham, in Virginia.9 (SEE LATER) The marriage between John Cotton and Sarah Fuljames has also provided a clue of the connection between the Somerset Fuljames family and the ancient Foljambe family of Derbyshire. Sarah died at the Cotton estate of Botreaux Castle, Cornwall and was buried at Minster Church, Cornwall in 1677. Her widower husband did not remarry. James II knighted him at Whitehall on 9 July 1685. Sir John died at his Botreaux Castle estate on 2 February 1703 and was buried at Minster Church. He left a monument in Minster churchyard that shows Sarah Fuljames? arms as ?Azure, a Bend Between Six Escallops, Or? impaled by Sir John Cotton.11 This is clearly the Foljambe family arms differenced (Fuljames? azure tincture substituted for Foljambe sable tincture) for a younger branch. Since the Fuljames differenced arms are shown in the General Armory of England, it is inferred that these arms are credible and would apply to Anthony Fuljames as son of John Fuljames of Woodbrooke.
    At about the time that Anthony Fuljames disappeared from the records of Somersetshire in 1643, a phonetically similar Anthony Fulgham appeared in Virginia records.

    ANTHONY FULGHAM OF VIRGINIA

    Anthony Fulgham first appeared in the official records of Virginia in a land patent dated 22 October 1643 as Anthony Fulliamb.13 No official birth record for Anthony Fulliamb/Fulgham has been found; however, a clue to his approximate birth date is included in the 1643 land patent. Fulgham?s partner in the 100 acre patent, Sylvester Thacker, appears to have been the ?Silvester Thatcher?, aged 21 years, that came over on the Paule of London, Leonard Betts, Master, on July 6, 1635, placing Thacker?s birth year in 1614.14 It is believed that Fulgham and Thacker were contemporaries, with Thacker being slightly older based on his name recorded first on the patent. It is inferred that Fulgham?s birth year was 1615.
    The sparse remaining document trail of Anthony Fulgham?s activities in Virginia can yet provide a rough sketch of his post-1640 life. The following chronology highlights his major activities and the timing thereof:

    1640: Silvester Thacker & Anthony Fulliamb, filed for 100 ac. Patent in Isle of Wight County, Virginia.

    22 Oct 1643: Silvester Thacker & Anthony Fulliamb, 100 acs. Isle of Wight Co. Page 937. Lying upon Pagan Point Bay, E. upon land of Mr. Thomas Davis & S. upon Mr. John Mahoone. Trans of 2 pers: John Cockett (Corbett?) & Sarah (Hanah?) Robinson.13 ?
    1647: Anthony Fuljam, filed for 500 ac. Patent at the Corotoman River, Northumberland (Lancaster) County.

    5 Sept 1650: Anthony Fuljam, 500 acs. lyeing on N. side Rappa. Riv., next above the land of George Taylor, (on the south side of the easternmost branch of the Corotoman River), p. 259. Trans. 10 pers.: Stephen Chilton, Anne Venicomb, Hump. Jones, John Boein, George Minery, Owen Middleton, John Godwin, Wm. Bilby, Eliza. Waters, Charles Barcroft, ?the 3rd tyme due for.?13
    ?4 Feb 1654: Will of Robert Chambers, dated 4 Feb 1654 (N.S.) in Lancaster County mentions ?Mr. Fullgham? as a legatee.15 This indicates that Anthony Fulgham was residing on his Corotoman patent as late as Feb 1654.

    16 Dec 1654: Sylvester Thacher, Gent. of Lancaster County to Anthony Fulgham; 100 acres (whereon said Thatcher formerly lived but now in the tenure of Richard Way.) on Warrisqueak Bay and bounded by Richard Maddison, Nathaniel Jones, John Tomlin and Thomas Jones (formerly belonged to Captain John Moon) and said Fulgham (formerly granted to Mr. Thomas Davis.) Witnesses: Edward Skynner and Robert Bird.16??14 Aug 1655: Anthony Fulgeham, Planter, indentured Katherine Diamant & Hester Meene, Spinsters, in Bristol, Gloucester for transport to Virginia.17

    1659: Capt. John Weir, filed for 1200 ac. Patent at Corotoman, Lancaster County, Va.??20 FEB 1662 - CAPT. JOHN WEIR, 1200 acs. Rappa. Co., 20 Feb 1662, p. 90 (579). Upon N. side of Rappa. Riv., 500 acs. at the run next above land of George Taylour; 700 acs. upon Cliffts Cr. & running unto land of Antho. Fullgam. 500 acs. granted to sd. Fullgam, 5 Sept 1650 & assigned to sd. Weir; 700 acs. granted sd. Weir, 14 May 1653.13 ??28 Jun, 1664: Capt Anthony Fulgham, 1000 acs. Is. of Wight Co., p. 383. On a br. of the Black Water, beg. at S.W., cor. of Mathew Tomlin?s land, running Wly. & c. by a meadow &c. Trans. of 20 pers; Daniell Wilson, his wife, Edd. Atwood, Robt. Cole, Katharine Diamant, Martha Greene, Wm. Lewis, Robt., Edwards, Jno Browne, Jno Fulgham, Anthony Fulgham, Jno Boron, Eliz Day, Joseph Butler, Hen Gough, Jno Whoman, Eliz Barnett (or Barrett), Susan Smith, Tho. St. Jno., Jno Wilson.13 ?
    9 NOV 1664: Daniel Miles, aged 25, being at John Weston?s house in Dec., 1663, Robert Smyth and one of Mr. Fulgham?s sons ran for a passage over the creek not presently ready. 9 Nov., 1664.18

    12 Jul 1665: Capt. Anthony Fulgham, 1600 acs. Isle of Wight Co., p. 253. Beg at W. side of a meadow at the head of the W. Branch, running W by Mr. Bodye?s marked trees &c. Trans. of 30 pers: Wm. Bressie, Susan his wife, Eliz Powell, Jno. Trupsha, Ruben Gladill, Jno. Warborton, Richd. Avery, Thomas Walter 8 times, his father & mother, Wm. & Jane Walter, Jno. Holly, Jno. Collins, Richard Bennett, Richd. Seward, Anthony Fulgham, Jno. Fulgham, Joane a Negro, Ann White, Thomas Cheny, Robt. Edwards, Jane Morgan, Mary Harris, Blanch Harding.13

    9 Feb 1666: Capt. Anthony Fulgham present att court. He appears to have been appointed an Isle of Wight County Justice some time before this date.18

    9 Jun 1666: Acknowledgment by George Dewey (sic. Durant) that he had full satisfaction of Capt. Anthony Fulgham of all est. (sic., estate) of Ann Harwood, orphan, now wife of said Dewey (sic., Durant) and fully discharge the said An. Fulgham, 9 June, 1666. Teste, Dianah Barnes.18 ??18 March 1668: Capt. Anthony Fulgham, 150 acs. Isle of Wight Co., Pat. Bk. 6 pg. 215.19??Oct 1669: Capt. Anthony Fulgham, died intestate. Administration requested by his relict, Martha 2 May 1670, recorded 24 June 1670, Security ? sons John and Michael Fulgham.18

    As of the date of this writing, no record of Anthony Fulgham?s marriage to his wife, Martha, has been found. However, there are clues to their children?s birth years in the Isle of Wight County records that accommodate inferences of Anthony and Martha?s approximate date and location of marriage. As noted in the deposition by Daniel Miles above18, in Dec 1663, Robert Smith, Jr. and ?one of Mr. Fulgham?s sons? ran for a passage over a local creek. A deposition given in 1677 by Robert Smith, Jr., aged 22, concerning his father?s sloop18 has shown Robert, Jr.?s year of birth to be 1654. It is reasonable to speculate that Robert Smith, Jr. and Mr. Fulgham?s son would have been approximately the same age ? two nine or ten year olds getting into mischief at the creek. Since the eldest Fulgham son and heir, John Fulgham of Blackwater, recorded a Quit Claim Deed to his brother Anthony in 1669, on or before that date he would have reached the required 21year old age of majority. Therefore, it is reasonable to infer that John was born on or before 1648 and probably was not the ?Mr. Fulgham?s son? referred to in Daniel Miles? deposition. Thus, Mr. Fulgham?s son was likely the second oldest, Anthony, making Anthony, Jr.?s birth year ca. 1654-56.
    Based on the previous chronology, it is noted that Capt. Anthony had been in Bristol, Gloucester arranging an indenture for Katherine Diamant in August 1655.17 This dating of Katherine?s indenture is important both for the timing of Anthony Fulgham?s second trip to England and for the emigration of Martha Greene. Other than his original emigration from England ca. 1640, this 1655 trip is the only documented trip that has been proven for Captain Anthony. Anthony?s 1664 land patent for Blackwater included Katherine Diamant and Martha Greene.13 It is speculated that both Katherine Diamant and Martha Greene were transported by Anthony Fulgham to Virginia in 1655 and, since Martha was surnamed Greene and not Fulgham in the land patent, the record suggests that he married Martha in Virginia in ca 1655 after registering her head right as Martha Greene. Since his oldest son John was born prior to 1648, John had to have been from a previous marriage. No record of Anthony Fulgham?s previous marriage has been found in Virginia records and so it is reasonable to infer that the said marriage took place in England and that the first-born of that marriage, John Fulgham, was born in England.
    An exhaustive search of the IGI for England leads to only one suitable candidate for a John Fulgham (or phonetic variant) born on or after 1638 (the year in which Anthony reached 23 years of age) and before 1648 (the year by which John had to have been born in order to reach the age of majority when he quit-claimed the Pagan plantation to Anthony, Jr. in 1669) and whose father?s name was Anthony. Based on the results of this search, it is the opinion of this author that John Fulgham of Blackwater was the son of Anthony Fuljames of Woodbrooke, Pitminster, Somersetshire and he was christened on 15 October 1639 in Pitminster, Somerset.3 Anthony Fulgham?s 1664 patent for Blackwater land and his 1665 patent for West Branch land together list Anthony Fulgham twice and John Fulgham twice as headrights.13 It is clear from this that Anthony, Sr. entered Virginia twice and that John entered Virginia twice. Although no original Virginia immigration record for Anthony, Sr. has been found it is speculated that he did not pay his own transportation cost for the ca 1640 trip. He did return to England during 1640 and stayed at least through 1643 for the births of his second and third children, Thomas and Elizabeth, born in 1641 and 1643 respectively, in Pitminster, Somerset.3 The final status of his wife, Elizabeth and his children, Thomas and Elizabeth, is unclear but he returned to Virginia between 1643 and 1647 with ten headrights and filed for a 500 acre patent (in at that time Chicacoan Indian Territory, later Lancaster County.)13 This author believes that he brought his son John over to Virginia with him on this trip. It was during the three years between 1647 and 1650, while Anthony and John were ?seating? the 500-acre patent, that Counselor John Were of Silverton, Devon?s estates in England were sequestered by Parliament. It was no coincidence that the Were/Weare family filed for a 700-acre patent abutting upon Anthony Fulgham?s land in Lancaster Co., Va. in 1650.13

    COUNSELOR JOHN WERE OF SILVERTON

    The reverend and antiquarian J. Heald Ward of Somersetshire authored the following comprehensive article on the Counselor John Were of Silverton family in 1910:

    ?The Weres of Silverton were a branch of the Weres or Weares of Halberton. This family was connected with that of Bishop Gilbert Bourne,18sometime Queen Mary's favourite chaplain, who died at Silverton in 1569, a grandson of Richard, brother of the Bishop, having married a Weare of Halberton (Eliz., b. 1600 at Halberton, dau of Humphrey Weare m. Gilbert Bourne ca. 1619.)22 Another descendant was Humphrey Were (d. 1625), of Exeter College, Oxford (1585), M.P. for Tiverton (1623-4), and its first Recorder {Diary of Walter Yonge, M,P., p. 26).
    ? Counsellor John Were (d. 1676), the first of the Dunsmore line, was the son of the last named, and, like his father, a bencher of the Inner Temple. He married, in 1623, Margaret Dart (d. 1670). One of the earliest entries in the Silverton Registers is the baptism (1628) of their daughter Margaret (d. 1713), who married John Chichester, from which marriage were derived the Chichesters of Widworthy and Virginia. The Counsellor had also two sons, John and Thomas, who married two sisters, daughters of the Royalist Rector of Silverton, William Cotton, Precentor of Exeter (d. 1656). [NOTE: William Cotton was the father-in-law of Sarah Fuljames, Anthony Fulgham?s sister.]
    ? John the elder (d. 1677) succeeded to Dunsmore, his son and grandson (d. 1734), carrying on the succession. Thomas the younger (d. 1683) was of the Inner Temple. His only son Thomas (d. 1722) lived at Silverton, at Dunnixwell, a house of great antiquity, with interesting stonework and old oak panelling, recently (ca. 1910) demolished. During the many years Counsellor John Were resided at Silverton, he took an active part in parish business. We find him filling the office of churchwarden, and the ancient and responsible office of collector. In 1633 he was elected a feoffee of Blundell's School, his two sons being appointed feoffees thirty years later (1663). Like his friend and neighbour, Mr. Peter Sainthill, John Were strenuously endeavoured to further the Royal Cause. In 1638 the famous Covenant was taken, and in 1639 we find John Were contributing pecuniary aid to the King's expedition against the Scots. When the fighting began in Devon, Silverton was intensely Royalist. It had long had Royal associations. Its Saxon owner was King Edward the Confessor. The Manor continued in the Crown till it was bestowed by a Plantagenet King on one of his favourites ? a Beauchamp. A later owner of the Manor, Sir Matthew Gumey, had fought with the Black Prince at Crecy and Poitiers. Another, Sir Nicholas Wadham, as Captain of the Isle of Wight, had accompanied King Henry VIII upon the " Field of Cloth of Gold " (State Papers). Bishop Cotton, a protege of Queen Elizabeth, long resided at Silverton, and was domiciled at the Rectory in 1621, had done his utmost to foster loyalty to the Church and Throne. His son and successor, Precentor Cotton " a gentle, humble man of sober and grand conversation was a devoted adherent of the King. It was stated by Treasurer Cotton that his father " lost 1000 a year and his ecclesiastical estate, by his loyalty " (Petition to Charles II). The Chcuinons (sic), the Wreyfords, the Beares, the Skibbowes, one of whom attempted (1649) an insurrection against Cromwell, and Ambrose Potter, the Royalist lawyer, were among the resident landowners on the King's side. It was in the house of a Mr. Potter, Charles II told (Oct., 1680) Pepys that he had lain when at Exeter.
    ?In 1643, after an eight months' siege, the city (of Exeter) was captured (Sept. 4th) by Prince Maurice, and Sir John Berkeley (younger brother of Sir William Berkeley, Gov. of Va.), an honourable and capable man, appointed Governor. There at Bedford House the Princess Henrietta was bom (June 16th, 1644), her mother within a month embarking (July 14th) for France, leaving her infant in the charge of Sir John Berkeley and Lady Dalkeith. On July 26th the King arrived, and before setting out on his victorious pursuit of Essex, held a council of war at Bradninch, staying for a day and a night at the house of Mr. Sainthill. The anticipated victory took place at Lostwithiel (Sept. 2nd, 1644), where the ever-popular Essex blundered, then escaped, throwing, as was his wont, all the blame on others. Returning from Cornwall the King appointed as Chaplain to the infant Princess, Dr. Thomas Fuller, who soon became a favourite. Fuller is described as a man of large build, with laughing blue eyes and flaxen hair, of a frank and open countenance, always on the look out for points of agreement, rather than for points of difference, never known to take offence, with whom it was impossible to quarrel. In the days of stress and anxiety which preceded the capitulation Fuller's tact, strong sense and sunniness of disposition must have been of priceless value. Fuller notes the following incident:

    ?When the city of Exeter was besieged by the Parliamentary forces, so that only the South side thereof towards the sea was open unto it, incredible numbers of larks were found in that open quarter, the multitude like quails in the wilderness . . . hereof I was an eye and a mouth witness. . . . They were as fat as plentiful, so that being sold for two pence a dozen and under, the poor, who could have no cheaper, as the rich no better meat, used to make pottage of them boyling them down therein. Several natural causes were assigned hereof. . . . However, the cause of causes was Divine Providence." (Worthies),

    ? Events moved quickly. In February 1645, the New Model (Army) ordinance was passed. Soon followed Naseby (June 14th), and the fall of Bristol (Sept. 11th). The whole aspect of affairs had changed. Full of stern confidence, the army of Fairfax advanced into Devonshire. On the 15th of October he was at Cullompton, where a skirmish took place. On the 19th Tiverton Castle was taken. Thence he marched (Oct. 20th) to Silverton, where a council of war was held. As many of the soldiers were sick, and wearied by continual marching, it was resolved, ?after a long and serious debate," instead of going further, to straiten Excester." On the 24th, Cromwell, ten days after the storming of Basing House, arrived at Crediton, where the army of Fairfax that day was. Fairfax invested the city, occupying positions, first on the east side, then on the west. Exeter was held by the valorous Sir John Berkeley throughout the winter of 1645-6. On the 31st March almost the whole of Fairfax's army was quartered at Silverton {Anglia Bediviva). The same day Fairfax summoned the Governor to surrender, who chose Master John Weare as one of his commissioners to treat with Fairfax. One of the articles of capitulation was that the Princess Henrietta should be allowed to go to any place in England or Wales that Lady Dalkeith might select and the King approve of. Now there is a tradition that one of the King's children sought refuge at Dunsmore. John Were was in the confidence of Sir John Berkeley. His connections, the Cottons, were zealous Royalists, all on friendly terms with Fuller. It is quite possible that Lady Dalkeith may have made Dunsmore a temporary resting-place, before setting forth with the Princess to the Palace of Oatlands.
    ?The Silverton Royalists were, as might have been expected, heavily fined for what was called their delinquency, among others, John Were and his elder son.
    ?The following extract is from the State Papers :

    "committee for compounding.
    "John Were, Senior, Counsellor at law, Silverton, Co. Devon, and John his son.
    " 30th April, 1646. Both petition to compoimd on the Exeter articles, being engaged on the King's side, and in Exeter during the siege, the father being a Commissioner for the King.
    " 22nd August. Committee for compounding to the County Committee for Devon. Notwithstandig our suspension of Were's sequestration, he having paid or secured his fine, you on 13th August set his lands at Donesmore, compounded for by him, at 95 a year, to Hen. Turpin, of Therverton, for one year, at 60, though 100 was then proffered, refusing to conform to the letters of suspension; we wonder that you express such refractoriness, and are so ill husbands for the State as to refuse almost double the rent you have accepted. A thing which if represented to the House will meet with no fair interpretation.
    " 3rd Sept., 1646. Order for the Committee for compounding, that as the County Committee still refuse compliance, and as Were is yet in possession of the Estate they authorise him to maintain possession.
    ?5th Jan., 1648. Were's fine passed at 526." 22

    Counselor John Were and his family emigrated from Silverton and patented 700 acres in the northern neck of Virginia in 1650, becoming part of the Cavalier Migration. Rev. J. Heald Ward, in his article on Counselor John Were shown above, states that John Were was in the confidence of Sir John Berkeley,2the younger brother of Sir William Berkeley of Virginia. 22 This suggests that Were had strong Virginia political connections when he immigrated. Because Were and Fulgham abutted on each other?s patents on the Corotoman River and likely previously knew each other due to familial linkages in England, it is speculated that John Were and Anthony Fulgham worked together in exploring, investigating, surveying and seating their respective patents. John Weare/Were, Sr. claimed two headrights for his own transportation in his 1650 patent claim; therefore he personally had made two trips to Virginia by 1650. It is known from the will of Robert Chambers that Anthony Fulgham had built a house on his 500 acre patent.15 It is likely that he helped Counselor Were build a house on his patent before he brought over his family. Anthony Fulgham?s assignment of his 500 acres to Counselor Were (the date of the assignment is unclear in the Weir patent; however, it was likely before Fulgham returned to Isle of Wight County in 1655) and their personal relationship suggests a complex land development project that began perhaps as early as 1642 in England with planning and involved trips to Virginia, investigating promising locations, financing, obtaining and transporting servants, filing for patents, and seating claims by 1647 and 1650 for Fulgham and Were respectively.
    Between 1643 and 1647 Anthony Fulgham, Sr. had picked up ten headrights. The cost of transporting a headright was about 120 pounds of tobacco per person. This price is based on the transportation fee charged Virginia bachelors upon their marrying spinster women recently brought into the colony. At the then-current price of one pence per pound of tobacco, the cost was around $300 per headright in current US currency. Upon receiving a patent for 50 acres of uncleared land, the unit cost would compute to $6/acre for headright land. Land on the open market went for $12/acre for uncleared land and $30/acre for cleared land.23 It is not known what John Were paid Anthony Fulgham for the assignment of his 500 acres; however, we know that Fulgham built a house on his land and probably a dock and other structures and with these improvements it suggests that a higher price was more likely. 15 If Were paid him the $30/acre market price, he would have had $15,000 to roll into another 50 headrights. Ultimately Fulgham invested in 16 headrights for his West Branch patent (William Bressie invested in the remaining 16 headrights) and Fulgham invested in 20 headrights for the Blackwater patent.13 Additionally, he capitalized on the two in-bound trips that he and John Fulgham had made in ca. 1647 and 1655.

    CONCLUSION

    The person that we know as Captain Anthony Fulgham was born in ca. 1615 in Pitminster, Somersetshire, the second son of John Fuljames of Woodbrooke, Gentleman; and Sarah (Hole) Fuljames. Anthony?s ancestors first domiciled in Somersetshire in the early 16th century while serving Henry VIII, accumulated customary lands in Weston Zoyland, High Ham, Angersleigh, and other parishes before settling in Pitminster parish. Anthony Fuljames of Pitminster, Somerset, descended from a younger branch of the ancient Family of Foljambe of Derbyshire. From the earliest history of the Foljambe family it is clear that its patriarchs were involved in estate management for the sovereigns and great men, bearing titles such as Forrester and Bailiff of the High Peak, Seneschal for Queen Philippa and John of Gaunt, King?s Escheator in Lincolnshire, and so forth. The Foljambe family of Derbyshire was an exceedingly knightly family and throughout the centuries from the 12th into modern times the senior line of the family maintained its pedigree and kept its arms ?sable, a bend between six esceallops, or.? In the fourteenth century the Foljambe family inherited lands in Lincolnshire and the Fuljames? ancestor, a younger son, was dispatched to manage certain aspects of the estate. Eventually, a descendant from this younger son inherited an estate for life in Hertfordshire. The Fuljames? ancestor?s possession of the Hertford estate expired ca. 1500 and the progeny then living returned to the traditional Foljambe occupation, i.e., serving as agents for the king. The original Fuljames immigrant that permanently settled in Somersetshire was William Fuljames b. Ing?s Manor, Harpenden, Hertfordshire ca. 1490 and held lands in Somersetshire in 1535. William was Captain Anthony Fulgham?s GG Grandfather.
    Anthony Fuljames married Elizabeth Norris on 10 Nov 1638 in Pitminster, Somerset. They had three children: John b. 1639, Thomas b. 1641 and Elizabeth b. 1643 all born in Pitminster. Elizabeth Norris, Thomas and Elizabeth Fuljames disappeared from the Somersetshire records after 1643 and it is presumed that they deceased.
    Before 1647, Anthony Fuliames sailed with 10 passengers at his expense to Virginia. It is believed that he brought his oldest son, John, with him on this trip. Between 1647 and 1650 Anthony Fuliames (now Fulgham), his son John, and perhaps others, constructed living quarters, boat landings and cleared land. In 1650 they were joined by the John Weare family of Silverton, Devon. In ca. 1654 Fulgham and Weare executed assignment of Fulgham?s 500 acres and improvements to Weare. In 1655 Fulgham purchased indentures for selected servants in Bristol, Gloucester and brought over perhaps 36 headrights, including Martha Greene. Anthony Fulgham and Martha Greene married ca. 1655 and had their first son, Anthony, Jr. probably within that year. In 1661, Anthony, Sr. filed for patent on 1000 acres on the Blackwater River and set up his oldest son, John, to manage it.
    Captain Anthony Fulgham died in Octobert 1669 and left his wife and sons two plantations with necessary stock, implements and furnishings. His eldest son John held the 1,000-acre Blackwater plantation and wife Martha and youngest children held his Pagan River plantation and home place amounting to 300 acres and more. But most of all, Captain Anthony left his legacy of the establishment of the Fulgham Family in America.
    Before reaching a final conclusion of this work, let us address the Fuljames? arms and their connection to the ancient Foljambe arms of Derbyshire. To start, the attention of the reader is directed to the brief biography of Sarah Fuljames d. 1677, and her husband, Sir John Cotton, d. 1703, earlier in this work. It is noted that after Sir John?s death, the executors of Sir John?s will arranged for the erection of a monument to John and Sarah in Minster Church graveyard in Cornwall. The monument includes the Fuljames? arms, ?azure, a bend between six escallops, or? and the arms are impaled by Sir John Cotton. These arms are obviously the arms of Foljambe differenced for a younger, or Cadet, branch of the family by changing the arms tincture from sable to azure.11 These Fuljames? arms are also published in Burke?s General Armory of England, which lends them some credibility.
    The earliest of the Fuljames? line to apparently become isolated from the senior Foljambe line and not be identified as ?gent.? in official records was Anthony Fulgham?s GGG Grandfather William of Harpenden, Hertfordshire in the late 15th century. Two generations later, Anthony Fulgham?s Great Grandfather included the following introductory sentence in his last will and testament ?? I John Fuljames of Linne in the parish of Weston in Zoyland in the countie of Somerset, Yeoman ?? John used the title ?yeoman? because he either would not or could not prove direct descent from an ?Armiger (one authorized to bear arms).? The fact was that John was highly qualified to be called Gentleman, although through his inability to trace his lineage he apparently could not prove his descent from an Armiger. Ironically, based on the bequests in his will, his net worth was above the average gentleman?s.
    Anthony Fulgham?s father, John Fuljames of Woodbrooke, Gent., apparently had performed research on his lineage and identified his descent from an Armiger. Because of his efforts, the Fulghams of America can now trace our lineage back to our Foljambe ancestors.

    CITATIONS

    1. Great Britain, PRO; Letters and Papers, Foreign and Domestic, of the Reign of Henry VIII; Google eBook; Vol. 3, pt 1, pg 312.
    2. Somerset Record Society; Proceedings in the Court of the Star Chamber ?; Harrison & Sons, London; 1911.
    3. Web Page; www.familysearch.org
    4. Weaver, Frederick William; Notes & Queries for Somerset and Dorset; Vol. IV; J. C. and A. T. Sawtell, Sherborne; 1895.
    5. Rice, Charles Elmer; A History of the Hole Family in England and America; The R. M. Scranton Publishing Company, Alliance, OH; 1904.
    6. Westcote, Thomas; A View of Devonshire in 1630, With a Pedigree of Most of its Gentry; Google eBook.
    7. Parker, Kim; Steeple in Hutchins; Web Site: www.opc .org.
    8. MacLean, Sir John; The Parochial and Family History of the Parishes of Ferrabury and Minster, Cornwall; Web Site: www.books.google.com/books.
    9. Nugent, Nell Marion; Cavaliers and Pioneers; Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.; Baltimore; 1983.
    10. Devon Assoc. for the Advancement of Science, Literature and Art; Reports and? Transactions; Google eBook; Vol. 49.
    11. Burke, Sir Bernard; The General Armory of England...; Harrison; Pall Mall; ? London; 1884.?12. Wrigley, E.A.; Family Limitation in Pre-Industrial England; The Economic
    History Review, Vol. 19, No.1 (1966), pg. 86.?13. Nugent, Nell Marion; Cavaliers and Pioneers; Genealogical Publishing Co., ? Baltimore; 1983.
    14. Hotten, John Camden; The Original Lists of Persons of Quality; Empire State Book Co., NY.
    15. Lee, Ida J.; Abstracts of Lancaster County Virginia Wills 1653 ? 1800; Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.; Baltimore; 1973.
    16. Hopkins, William Lindsay; Isle of Wight County Va. Colonial Deeds (1647 ? 1719), Court Orders (1693 ? 1695) & Guardian Bonds (1740 ? 1767); Iberian Publishing Company; Athens, GA; 1993.
    17. Bristol Database; Web Page: www.virtualjamestown.org/indentures.
    18. Boddie, John Bennett; Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight County Virginia; Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.; Baltimore; 1980.
    19. Isle of Wight County, VA; Patent Book 6, Page 215; Smithfield, Va. County Courthouse, Smithfield, Va.
    20. Chapman, Blanche Adam; Wills and Administrations of Isle of Wight County Virginia 1647 ? 1800; Heritage Books; Westminster, MD; 2006.
    21. William & Mary Quarterly Historical Magazine, Vol 7, No. 4, April 1899; pp. 205 ? 315.
    22. Ward, Rev. J. Heald; Report and Transactions of the Devonshire Association for the Advancement of Science, Literature and Art; Vol. 49; Google eBook.
    23. Abernathy, Thomas Perkins; Three Virginia Frontiers; Smith; Gloucester, MA; 1962., , , , , , , , , , , , ,
  • Change Date: 30 DEC 2013



    Father: JOHN FOLJAMBE b: ABT 1575 in ANGERSLEIGH, SOMERSETSHIRE
    Mother: SARAH HOLE b: ABT 1585 in PITMINSTER, SOMERSETSHIRE

    Marriage 1 ELIZABETH2 NORRIS b: 16 FEB 1623 in BRIDGWATER, SOMERSETSHIRE
    • Married: 10 NOV 1638 in PITMINSTER, SOMERSETSHIRE 6 7
    Children
    1. Has Children JOHN FULGHAM b: 15 OCT 1639 in PITMINSTER, SOMERSETSHIRE
    2. Has No Children THOMAS FOLJAMBE b: 21 SEP 1641 in PITMINSTER, SOMERSETSHIRE
    3. Has No Children ELIZABETH FOLJAMBE b: 14 SEP 1643 in PITMINSTER, SOMERSETSHIRE

    Marriage 2 MARTHA GREENE b: 26 MAR 1626 in ST GILES CRIPPLEGATE, LONDON
    • Married: 1655 in PROB ISLE OF WIGHT CO., VA
    Children
    1. Has No Children ANTHONY FULGHAM b: DEC 1655 in ENGLAND, U.S.A
    2. Has Children MICHAEL FULGHAM b: ABT 1656 in ISLE OF WIGHT CO., VA, U.S.A
    3. Has Children NICHOLAS FULGHAM b: ABT 1657 in ISLE OF WIGHT CO, VA, U.S.A
    4. Has Children MARY WATSON b: ABT 1665 in ISLE OF WIGHT CO VA

    Sources:
    1. Type: Book
      Title: Seventeenth Century Isle of Wight County Virginia
      Author: Boddie, John Bennett
      Publication: Genealogical Publishing Company; Baltimore
      Date: 1980
    2. Type: Periodical
      Author: Fulgham, James Grant
      Title: The Story of Captain Anthony Fulgham
      Periodical: Fulgham-Fulghum Family Facts
      Date: Spring 2014
      Date: 30 DEC 2013
    3. Type: Book
      Author: Nugent, Nell Marion
      Periodical: Cavaliers and Pioneers, Abstracts of Virginia Land Patents and Grants
      Publication: Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, 1983
    4. Type: Book
      Author: Lee, Ida J.
      Periodical: Abstracts of Lancaster County, Virginia, Wills 1653-1800
      Publication: Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc.; Baltimore; 1973
    5. Type: Book
      Author: Hopkins, William Lindsay
      Periodical: Isle of Wight County Virginia Deeds 1647-1719, Court Orders 1693-1695 & Guardian Accounts 1740-1767
      Publication: Iberian Publishing Company; Athens GA; 1995
    6. Type: Web Site
      URL: http://www.familysearch.org/eng/Search/frameset_search.asp?PAGE=igi/search_IGI.asp
    7. Type: Book
      Author: Phillimore, William
      Periodical: Somerset Parish Registers: Marriages
      Publication: Google eBook

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