Gordon Family Tree 2012

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  • ID: I22811
  • Name: Catherine Annenontak
  • Sex: F
  • Reference Number: CG23098
  • Birth: 03 JUN 1649 in Touagnainchain, (Bourg de St-Madeleine), Paroisse de la Conception, Huron Nation, Georgian Bay, Ontario
  • Event: Alt Name Catherine Annenontak dite Créature de Dieu
  • Death: 12 JAN 1710 in Batiscan, Québec, Canada
  • Note:
    Catherine Annenontak was born in 1649. A tiny,
    bronze-tinted baby girl was born in a bark covered long house of the
    Hurons at Georgian Bay, near Lake Huron. The French
    missionary, Chaumonot, baptized her with the name of Caterine
    Annannontok, and affectionately dubbed her Belle Fleur de Bois,
    (beautiful flower of the woods). Her father, Nicolas Arendanke, was one
    of three principal chiefs of the Bear Clan. Both he and his wife, Jeanne
    Otrihoandet, were baptized by the black-robed Jesuits who came among
    their native peoples some years before. "Katerie," strapped
    securely in her colourful, beaded cradle-board on her mother's strong
    back looked like a tine sepia-toned doll with raven-black hair, bright
    obsidian eyes, a pug nose, and a little mouth constantly moving.
    Originally, there were approximately 25,000-30,000
    Hurons living peacefully in an area, roughly 40 by 20 miles, called
    "Huronia". Since the coming of the white man in the early 1600s, many
    of the Hurons perished from starvation and the white man's diseases.
    A far greater disaster struck in March 1649, when
    thousands of ferocious Iroquois from the Hudson River Valley attacked
    and practically annihilated the entire Huron Nation, including the five
    North American Martyrs. Only about 300 Hurons, mostly women, children,
    the infirm and the elderly escaped to nearby St. Joseph's Island. One of
    the survivors, carried to safety by her loving mother was Catherine.
    Sadly, her chieftain father was tortured and/or killed outright by the
    Iroquois on March 17th, 1649, while defending his people.
    After three months of hiding and recuperating from
    wounds and sickness, the surviving band of Hurons made a desperate dash
    for freedom by paddling their birch-bark canoes through hostile
    territory. Their perilous 1,500 mile escape route took them
    from Georgian Bay on Lake Huron, along the French River, across Lake
    Nipissing, down the Ottowa River, along the mighty St. Lawrence, past
    the Lachine Rapids to Montreal Island, finally arriving at the
    Fortress City of Quebec. They arrived on July 28, 1649, six weeks after
    their journey began. Kateri, her mother, and the other
    survivors of the Great Massacre were settled on the nearby Ile d'
    Orléans. On July 21st, 1654, Catherines's heroic mother was suddenly
    cut down by fever, leaving her five year old, an orphan. The little
    Indian Princess was then bought to the Ursuline convent in Quebec City
    where she was raised and educated by the Catholic nuns there. She was so
    beloved by them, that they called her, la petite créature de Dieu,
    (little creature of God) On Sept. 23rd, 1662, the Belle
    Fleur de Boise contracted to marry Jean Durand, dit LaFortune, a soldier
    of the famous Carignan regiment. He was previously engaged to a fickle
    Parisienne who broke her promise to him and to a subsequent suitor
    before finally marrying her third choice. The soldier and princess wed
    at Quebec City on Sept. 26th, 1662 in the presence of many officials
    and friends. Jean signed his name "J.Durand," while 14 yearr-old Kateri,
    signed her name "Catherine Huron." During their nine years of happy
    marriage, they were blessed with three children; Marie, Ignace and
    Louis. Both sons and the husband of Marie (Mathurine Cadot), became
    adventurous voyageurs, (canoe-men), who engaged in the lucrative fur
    trade between Montreal and the Great Lakes and the Pays d'en haut,
    (high country, the west). Early in 1672, Kateri received a
    terrible shock. Her husband Jean died suddenly at the premature age of
    35 years. Whether by accident, disease or tomahawk, Jean Durand left the
    "Creature of God" a young widow with three small children. The oldest
    was five years old, ironically, the same age at which Kateri had become
    orphaned. During those dangerous and hard times, it was necessary to
    forego the usual mourning period, so Catherine chose, from several
    suitors, Jacques Couturier, a 26 year-old Norman French bachelor as her
    second husband. The nuptials were at Quebec City on June 26th, 1672. To
    this union there were six enfants du deuxieme lit (children of the
    second bed), namely: Charles, Jacques, (died in infancy), Genevieve,
    Denis dit Joseph, Jean-Francois, and Catherine (died one month old). Like
    their step-brothers before them, Charles, Joseph, and Jean-Francois
    became voyageurs and coureurs de bois (wood runners/rangers). Again,
    however, Kateri sadly lost her husband, Jacques, prematurely at the age
    of 31 years. He succumbed to an epidemic of measles and scurvy during
    the year 1687-1688, in which over 1,400 people perished, nearly
    one-eighth of the French population. Ten years later Kateri
    married a third time, on August 26th, 1697, to Jean de Lafond,
    (1646-1716), widower of Catherine Senecal. He brought into this union
    three remaining dependent children from the eight begotten from his
    first wife. His mother was a sister to the first Governor of Three
    Rivers and the founder of Boucherville. It should be noted that Kateri
    signed herself, Catherine Durant on the marriage contract and Catherine
    Annannontak on the civil register. Shortly after this time, her heart
    was again broken by the loss of two of her sons in the flower of their
    youth. Ignace Durand died on Nov. 30th, 1697 at the age of 28 years, and
    Charles Couturier died on April 23rd, 1699, at the age of 26 years. There
    were no children born to her third and final marriage. A
    decade passed before the final curtain came down on the life story of
    the Amerindian Princess. Catherin "Kateri", Annannontak - Belle Fleur de
    Bois, The Little Creature of God - was taken from life's scene by an
    epidemic of yellow fever, called the French, Mal de Siam, (lit. Siam
    Sickness- perhaps like the 20th century Asian Flu). She had lived 60
    summers in two cultures. Her sacred memory evokes the motto of Quebec
    Province, exemplified on it's auto licence plates: Je me souviens, (I
    Remember). Let us remember with pride this bronze-tinted
    Native American as she really was, a beautiful, courageous, faithful,
    well-educated, intelligent (she spoke several languages), living,
    resourceful and humble individual.
    We. Remember!

    An early Native American ancestor, called by Jesuit missionaries "Catherine, the beloved child of God (Annennontak) a Huron girl," was a descendant of the Huron Nation. The Christian names of Catherine?s parents were Nicolas Arendanki, meaning "He who comes from beyond Arenda," and Jeanne Otrihondi. In 1649, the Huron Nation was almost anihilated by the Iroquois and Catherine's father was killed. Catherine, a new-born infant, and her mother took refuge with surviving Jesuit missionaries. When her mother died, Catherine, age 5, was taken by the Jesuits to Quebec, where she became a protege of Madame de la Peltrie, the founder of the Ursulines in Quebec, and the ward of Venerable Mere Marie de L?Incarnation at the convent. Catherine was called "Catherine, the little creature of God" when she married first to a French settler, Jean Durand. She signed her marriage contract as "Catherine, Huron." After the death of Durand, Catherine, "the beloved child of God," entered into a contract of marriage on June 28, 1672 to Jacques Couturier, son of deceased Jean Couturier and Marie Aumont, a native of the parish of St. Martin de Queneville in Caen, Normandy, France.

    Jean Durand was born in 1640, the son of Louis and Madeleine Malvand at Doeuil-sur-le- Mignon, St. Onge, France. The contract he signed to come to Canada to serve as a colonist for three years, states he was about 20 years old. He was to receive passage to and from Canada, board and room and 75 livres per year, payable at the end of each year.

    He sailed from LaRochelle on "Les Armes d Amsterdam" at the beginning of April, 1660 and arrived at Quebec the latter part of May. The three years of service was with Charles Gautier. His life, like all colonists during that period, was quite varied-- farming, fishing, lumbering, etc. It also included serving in the Militia, because during that time all colonists lived in constant fear of the Iroqouis indians. In fact, Pierre Pinelle, his close friend and neighbor at Cap-Rouge, was murdered by them. The gun was a necessary adjunct to the plow.

    It was during this period that the King of France decided to send young girls to Canada to become the wives of the colonists. They were called the "King's Daughters". On October 3, 1661, Jean Durand was engaged to one of these, Marie Fayette. They were to be married at a later date so we nearly had a King's daughter for an ancestor, however, before the wedding date arrived, they changed their minds, cancelled their engagement on January 12, 1662, and on her third engagement she married Nicholas Huot on July 24, 1662.

    The next girl to capture Jean's heart was a young indian maiden who had been a refugee from the massacre of the Huron Missions by the Iroquois in 1648. This mission is known as Martyr's Shrine at Midland, Ontario. Her parents, Nicolas Arendanki and Jeanne Otri-ho-Andet lived at the parish mission of La Conception. Nicolas was one of the first Indian Chiefs to embrace the Christian religion and was well known to the missionaries Brebeuf Lalemant and Isaac Jogues and others who were martyred during the massacre. Nicolas was among the missing and no doubt suffered martyrdom like many others on that fateful day.

    Jeanne, who had given birth to Catherine in 1648, was left destitute without any means of support. She, along with many others under the care of Father Chaumonot, fled to the Petun Indian Country, who were friends of the Hurons. This is described in great detail in the Jesuit Relations. The refugees that survived the hardships and starvation lived in exile until June 10, 1650, when some 300 christian hurons, with the help of the surviving missionaries and french soldiers, embarked in canoes for their long voyage to the Isle of Orleans. Those that survived the shipwrecks, hardships and accidents on the way arrived at the Isle of Orleans on July 23, 1650.

    Catherine and her mother, who were among the survivors, were in poor health. During the summer of 1654, she was placed in the Ursuline convent of Quebec. Catherine remained under the tutelage of the nuns where she was taught not only the french language but also the french way of life. It was an objective of the Ursulines, the Jesuits, the Intendant, including the King, to educate the young indian maidens to eventually become suitable wives to the french colonists. Laval, the first bishop of Canada arrived june 16, 1659, and about two months later administered the sacrament of confirmation to a good number of young girls, french as well as indian. Catherine was among this group. The records show "confirmed at the Ursuline convent August 10, 1659 Catherine, Huron, age 10." It was only 3 years later, September 29, 1662, that Catherine and Jean Durand signed a contract to be married. The contract reads as follows:

    "In the presence of Guillaume Andouart, secretary to the Administrative council, established at Quebec, by the King, notary in New France and the undersigned witnesses, here present Jean Durand dit Lafortune, son of Louis Durand and Madeleine Malvande, his father and mother from the burg of Deuil near the village of St Jean d'Angely in the Xaintonges, party of the first part, and Catherine Huronne.... party of the second part, both in the presence of their relatives and friends here named, Charles Gautier, Lord of Bois Verdun, Denis Duquet, a resident of Quebec, Jean Guyon, Pierre Pinel, Jean Drouart on behalf of the first part. Martin Boutet, representing and taking place of the father of the said Catherine Huronne, Dame Magdeleine de Chauvigny, widow of the late Charles de Gruel, while living the Baron of Pelletierie, Miss Thienette Deslprey, widow of the late Guillaume Guilmot, Esq., Lord Duplessis de Querbodo, Laurent Dubocq resident of this country have recognized and !
    witnessed..............

    Three days later, September 26, they exchanged their marraige vows in the parish church of Quebec, known today as the Basilica. The authentic copy of this document reads as follows:

    In the year of our lord, one thousand six hundred and sixty two on the 26th day of September after engagement and publication of one bann (having given dispensation for the other two) read at mass the 24th of September and discovering no legitimate obstacle, I, Henri de Bernieres, priest of this parish, having questioned Jean Durand, son of Louis Durand and Madeleine Malvande, father and mother, from the parish of Doeuil, vicarage of Xaintes in Xaintonge, party of the first part, and Catherine Annenontak, Huron daughter of Nicolas Arendanki and Jeanne Otre-ho-Andet, father and mother, from the town of St. Madeleine in the Conception parish, in the land of the Hurons, party of the second part, and having received their mutual consent, I solemnly joined them in marriage and gave them the marriage blessing, in the presence of witnesses: Rev. Fathers' Lalemant, Superior, and Francois LeMercier of the company of Jesus Martin Boutet known as St Martin, Mr Jean Madry, etc. Signe!
    d H. de Bernieres
  • Note: Catherine Annenontak was born in 1649. A tiny, bronze-tinted baby girl was born in a bark covered long house of the Hurons at Georgian Bay, near Lake Huron. The French missionary, Chaumonot, baptized her with the name of Caterine Annannontok, and affectionately dubbed her Belle Fleur de Bois, (beautiful flower of the woods). Her father, Nicolas Arendanke, was one of three principal chiefs of the Bear Clan. Both he and his wife, Jeanne Otrihoandet, were baptized by the black-robed Jesuits who came among their native peoples some years before. "Katerie," strapped securely in her colourful, beaded cradle-board on her mother's strong back looked like a tine sepia-toned doll with raven-black hair, bright obsidian eyes, a pug nose, and a little mouth constantly moving. Originally, there were approximately 25,000-30,000 Hurons living peacefully in an area, roughly 40 by 20 miles, called "Huronia". Since the coming of the white man in the early 1600s, many of the Hurons perished from starvation and the white man's diseases. A far greater disaster struck in March 1649, when thousands of ferocious Iroquois from the Hudson River Valley attacked and practically annihilated the entire Huron Nation, including the five North American Martyrs. Only about 300 Hurons, mostly women, children, the infirm and the elderly escaped to nearby St. Joseph's Island. One of the survivors, carried to safety by her loving mother was Catherine. Sadly, her chieftain father was tortured and/or killed outright by the Iroquois on March 17th, 1649, while defending his people. After three months of hiding and recuperating from wounds and sickness, the surviving band of Hurons made a desperate dash for freedom by paddling their birch-bark canoes through hostile territory. Their perilous 1,500 mile escape route took them from Georgian Bay on Lake Huron, along the French River, across Lake Nipissing, down the Ottowa River, along the mighty St. Lawrence, past the Lachine Rapids to Montreal Island, finally arriving at the Fortress City of Quebec. They arrived on July 28, 1649, six weeks after their journey began. Kateri, her mother, and the other survivors of the Great Massacre were settled on the nearby Ile d' Orléans. On July 21st, 1654, Catherines's heroic mother was suddenly cut down by fever, leaving her five year old, an orphan. The little Indian Princess was then bought to the Ursuline convent in Quebec City where she was raised and educated by the Catholic nuns there. She was so beloved by them, that they called her, la petite créature de Dieu, (little creature of God) On Sept. 23rd, 1662, the Belle Fleur de Boise contracted to marry Jean Durand, dit LaFortune, a soldier of the famous Carignan regiment. He was previously engaged to a fickle Parisienne who broke her promise to him and to a subsequent suitor before finally marrying her third choice. The soldier and princess wed at Quebec City on Sept. 26th, 1662 in the presence of many officials and friends. Jean signed his name "J.Durand," while 14 yearr-old Kateri, signed her name "Catherine Huron." During their nine years of happy marriage, they were blessed with three children; Marie, Ignace and Louis. Both sons and the husband of Marie (Mathurine Cadot), became adventurous voyageurs, (canoe-men), who engaged in the lucrative fur trade between Montreal and the Great Lakes and the Pays d'en haut, (high country, the west). Early in 1672, Kateri received a terrible shock. Her husband Jean died suddenly at the premature age of 35 years. Whether by accident, disease or tomahawk, Jean Durand left the "Creature of God" a young widow with three small children. The oldest was five years old, ironically, the same age at which Kateri had become orphaned. During those dangerous and hard times, it was necessary to forego the usual mourning period, so Catherine chose, from several suitors, Jacques Couturier, a 26 year-old Norman French bachelor as her second husband. The nuptials were at Quebec City on June 26th, 1672. To this union there were six enfants du deuxieme lit (children of the second bed), namely: Charles, Jacques, (died in infancy), Genevieve, Denis dit Joseph, Jean-Francois, and Catherine (died one month old). Like their step-brothers before them, Charles, Joseph, and Jean-Francois became voyageurs and coureurs de bois (wood runners/rangers). Again, however, Kateri sadly lost her husband, Jacques, prematurely at the age of 31 years. He succumbed to an epidemic of measles and scurvy during the year 1687-1688, in which over 1,400 people perished, nearly one-eighth of the French population. Ten years later Kateri married a third time, on August 26th, 1697, to Jean de Lafond, (1646-1716), widower of Catherine Senecal. He brought into this union three remaining dependent children from the eight begotten from his first wife. His mother was a sister to the first Governor of Three Rivers and the founder of Boucherville. It should be noted that Kateri signed herself, Catherine Durant on the marriage contract and Catherine Annannontak on the civil register. Shortly after this time, her heart was again broken by the loss of two of her sons in the flower of their youth. Ignace Durand died on Nov. 30th, 1697 at the age of 28 years, and Charles Couturier died on April 23rd, 1699, at the age of 26 years. There were no children born to her third and final marriage. A decade passed before the final curtain came down on the life story of the Amerindian Princess. Catherin "Kateri", Annannontak - Belle Fleur de Bois, The Little Creature of God - was taken from life's scene by an epidemic of yellow fever, called the French, Mal de Siam, (lit. Siam Sickness- perhaps like the 20th century Asian Flu). She had lived 60 summers in two cultures. Her sacred memory evokes the motto of Quebec Province, exemplified on it's auto licence plates: Je me souviens, (I Remember). Let us remember with pride this bronze-tinted Native American as she really was, a beautiful, courageous, faithful, well-educated, intelligent (she spoke several languages), living, resourceful and humble individual. We. Remember! An early Native American ancestor, called by Jesuit missionaries "Catherine, the beloved child of God (Annennontak) a Huron girl," was a descendant of the Huron Nation. The Christian names of Catherine s parents were Nicolas Arendanki, meaning "He who comes from beyond Arenda," and Jeanne Otrihondi. In 1649, the Huron Nation was almost anihilated by the Iroquois and Catherine's father was killed. Catherine, a new-born infant, and her mother took refuge with surviving Jesuit missionaries. When her mother died, Catherine, age 5, was taken by the Jesuits to Quebec, where she became a protege of Madame de la Peltrie, the founder of the Ursulines in Quebec, and the ward of Venerable Mere Marie de L Incarnation at the convent. Catherine was called "Catherine, the little creature of God" when she married first to a French settler, Jean Durand. She signed her marriage contract as "Catherine, Huron." After the death of Durand, Catherine, "the beloved child of God," entered into a contract of marriage on June 28, 1672 to Jacques Couturier, son of deceased Jean Couturier and Marie Aumont, a native of the parish of St. Martin de Queneville in Caen, Normandy, France. Jean Durand was born in 1640, the son of Louis and Madeleine Malvand at Doeuil-sur-le- Mignon, St. Onge, France. The contract he signed to come to Canada to serve as a colonist for three years, states he was about 20 years old. He was to receive passage to and from Canada, board and room and 75 livres per year, payable at the end of each year. He sailed from LaRochelle on "Les Armes d Amsterdam" at the beginning of April, 1660 and arrived at Quebec the latter part of May. The three years of service was with Charles Gautier. His life, like all colonists during that period, was quite varied-- farming, fishing, lumbering, etc. It also included serving in the Militia, because during that time all colonists lived in constant fear of the Iroqouis indians. In fact, Pierre Pinelle, his close friend and neighbor at Cap-Rouge, was murdered by them. The gun was a necessary adjunct to the plow. It was during this period that the King of France decided to send young girls to Canada to become the wives of the colonists. They were called the "King's Daughters". On October 3, 1661, Jean Durand was engaged to one of these, Marie Fayette. They were to be married at a later date so we nearly had a King's daughter for an ancestor, however, before the wedding date arrived, they changed their minds, cancelled their engagement on January 12, 1662, and on her third engagement she married Nicholas Huot on July 24, 1662. The next girl to capture Jean's heart was a young indian maiden who had been a refugee from the massacre of the Huron Missions by the Iroquois in 1648. This mission is known as Martyr's Shrine at Midland, Ontario. Her parents, Nicolas Arendanki and Jeanne Otri-ho-Andet lived at the parish mission of La Conception. Nicolas was one of the first Indian Chiefs to embrace the Christian religion and was well known to the missionaries Brebeuf Lalemant and Isaac Jogues and others who were martyred during the massacre. Nicolas was among the missing and no doubt suffered martyrdom like many others on that fateful day. Jeanne, who had given birth to Catherine in 1648, was left destitute without any means of support. She, along with many others under the care of Father Chaumonot, fled to the Petun Indian Country, who were friends of the Hurons. This is described in great detail in the Jesuit Relations. The refugees that survived the hardships and starvation lived in exile until June 10, 1650, when some 300 christian hurons, with the help of the surviving missionaries and french soldiers, embarked in canoes for their long voyage to the Isle of Orleans. Those that survived the shipwrecks, hardships and accidents on the way arrived at the Isle of Orleans on July 23, 1650. Catherine and her mother, who were among the survivors, were in poor health. During the summer of 1654, she was placed in the Ursuline convent of Quebec. Catherine remained under the tutelage of the nuns where she was taught not only the french language but also the french way of life. It was an objective of the Ursulines, the Jesuits, the Intendant, including the King, to educate the young indian maidens to eventually become suitable wives to the french colonists. Laval, the first bishop of Canada arrived june 16, 1659, and about two months later administered the sacrament of confirmation to a good number of young girls, french as well as indian. Catherine was among this group. The records show "confirmed at the Ursuline convent August 10, 1659 Catherine, Huron, age 10." It was only 3 years later, September 29, 1662, that Catherine and Jean Durand signed a contract to be married. The contract reads as follows: "In the presence of Guillaume Andouart, secretary to the Administrative council, established at Quebec, by the King, notary in New France and the undersigned witnesses, here present Jean Durand dit Lafortune, son of Louis Durand and Madeleine Malvande, his father and mother from the burg of Deuil near the village of St Jean d'Angely in the Xaintonges, party of the first part, and Catherine Huronne.... party of the second part, both in the presence of their relatives and friends here named, Charles Gautier, Lord of Bois Verdun, Denis Duquet, a resident of Quebec, Jean Guyon, Pierre Pinel, Jean Drouart on behalf of the first part. Martin Boutet, representing and taking place of the father of the said Catherine Huronne, Dame Magdeleine de Chauvigny, widow of the late Charles de Gruel, while living the Baron of Pelletierie, Miss Thienette Deslprey, widow of the late Guillaume Guilmot, Esq., Lord Duplessis de Querbodo, Laurent Dubocq resident of this country have recognized and ! witnessed.............. Three days later, September 26, they exchanged their marraige vows in the parish church of Quebec, known today as the Basilica. The authentic copy of this document reads as follows: In the year of our lord, one thousand six hundred and sixty two on the 26th day of September after engagement and publication of one bann (having given dispensation for the other two) read at mass the 24th of September and discovering no legitimate obstacle, I, Henri de Bernieres, priest of this parish, having questioned Jean Durand, son of Louis Durand and Madeleine Malvande, father and mother, from the parish of Doeuil, vicarage of Xaintes in Xaintonge, party of the first part, and Catherine Annenontak, Huron daughter of Nicolas Arendanki and Jeanne Otre-ho-Andet, father and mother, from the town of St. Madeleine in the Conception parish, in the land of the Hurons, party of the second part, and having received their mutual consent, I solemnly joined them in marriage and gave them the marriage blessing, in the presence of witnesses: Rev. Fathers' Lalemant, Superior, and Francois LeMercier of the company of Jesus Martin Boutet known as St Martin, Mr Jean Madry, etc. Signe! d H. de Bernieres



    Father: Nicolas Arendanki b: 13 NOV 1620 in Touagnainchain, (Bourg de St-Madeleine), Paroisse de la Conception, Huron Nation, Georgian Bay, Ontario
    Mother: Jeanne Otri-ho-andet Otrihouandit b: ABT 1627 in Touagnainchain, (Bourg de St-Madeleine), Paroisse de la Conception, Huron Nation, Georgian Bay, Ontario

    Marriage 1 Jacques Couturier b: 1646 in St-Martin-de-Queneville, Caen, ev. Bayeux, Normandie, France
    • Married: 26 JUN 1672 in Québec, Québec, Canada
    Children
    1. Has No Children Charles Couturier b: 25 FEB 1673 in Cap-Rouge, Québec, Canada
    2. Has No Children Jacques Couturier b: 09 FEB 1675 in Cap-Rouge, Québec, Canada
    3. Has No Children Geneviève Couturier b: 25 MAR 1679 in Sillery, Québec, Canada
    4. Has Children Denis Joseph Couturier b: 20 MAR 1682 in Ancienne Lorette, Québec, Canada
    5. Has No Children Jean François Couturier b: 29 MAR 1684 in La Perade, Québec, Canada
    6. Has No Children Catherine Couturier b: 16 APR 1687 in Batiscan, Champlain, Québec, Canada

    Marriage 2 Jean Durand dit Lafortune b: ABT 1640 in Doeuil-sur-le-Mignon, St-Onge, Charentes Maritime, France
    • Married: 26 SEP 1662 in Basilica, Ville de Québec, Québec, Canada
    Children
    1. Has No Children Marie Catherine Durand b: 04 JUN 1666 in Sillery, Québec, Canada
    2. Has No Children Ignace Durand b: 1669 in Sillery, Québec, Canada
    3. Has No Children Louis Durand b: 13 NOV 1670 in Sillery, Québec, Canada
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