AaronMarshall1740-1826 Aaron Marshall website
Marshall/Marshel/Marshal Cross Creek Wash Co PA, Snowden, Van Swearingen, Col. John (O) Sullivan, Rabbitt,
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Entries: 1541    Updated: 2007-07-27 04:59:22 UTC (Fri)    Contact: Joe    Home Page: http://www.MiscellaneaMarescalliana.org Aaron Marshall born 1740

AaronMarshall1740-1826 Aaron Marshall website
I would like to connect with all my lines from Marshall/Marshel/Marshal, Snowden, Van Swearingen, also looking for someone in Col. James Marshel family

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  • ID: I1122
  • Name: Lt Col James Marshel Esq
  • Prefix: Lt Col
  • Given Name: James
  • Surname: Marshel
  • Suffix: Esq
  • ROMN: Col. James Marshel of Washington County PA unknown if brother of Aaron but put him here
  • Sex: M
  • Birth: 20 FEB 1753 in Lancaster Co. Pennsylvania Colony America
  • Note:
    Link to James Marshel essay
    http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~mabgenealogy/jmarshall.html



    http://books.google.com/books?id=78MbAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA252&dq=marshel



    Most items state James came from Ireland however this
    history book image says Lancaster County and another actually has
    his birthday
    notated by Joe Marshall
  • Death: 17 MAR 1829 in Wellsburg, Brooke County, Virginia
  • MAP:
  • LATI: N40.3097918
  • LONG: W80.5995179
  • Note:
    vicinity of Wellsburg

    Below you will find images of James' will


    this was not West Virginia at the time, but is now.
  • Change Date: 23 JUL 2007 at 22:28:48
  • Note:
    William Casselman of Westmoreland Co., Pa. to John Marshel ???(Marshall?)??? of Lancaster Co.,

    Pa., 400 acres on the headwaters of Cross Creek in Youghogania Co. and Ohio Co., Va., Dec.

    21, 1778.
    ???(Source: Deed Records in Washington Co., Pa. 1782-85.)???

    Pennsylvania oath of allegiance
    Cross Creek, 11 Sep. 1794 - presence of William Rea, Aaron Lyle, Thomas Patterson,

    Commissioners.

    William Rannalls, Henry Graham, Samuel McKibben, Thomas Patterson, Thomas Marshall, Gideon

    Gibson, John Morrison, Benjamin Bay, John Marshall, William McCaskey, Samuel Johnston,

    Robert Walker, Elijah Henwood, John Marshall, Robert Forsythe, Joseph Scott, William

    Campbell, Richard Wells, of James ???[sic]???, William Rea, Elijah Robertson, Peter Coe, James

    Davison, James Marshall, James How, John Leeper, Robert Marshall, Thomas Wiley, Alexander

    Wells, John Stevenson, George Wells, Wm. McKibben, Elisha Robertson, Robert Moore, James

    Jackson, Hugh Rogers, William Wells, Thomas Beaty, Isaac Cowan, John McClurg, James Linn,

    Joseph Riley, Thomas McKibben, William Caldwell, Nathaniel Pettit, Samuel Robertson, John

    Graham



    Mary Park, born in 1761, the only daughter of Samuel, became the wife of Col. John

    Marshall, of Cross Creek, in 1782.
    ROBERT LAW PARK is descended from Irish ancestry. His great-grandfather, Samuel Park, came

    from the North of Ireland and settled in Lancaster county, Penn. He afterward married

    Margaret Marshall, who had crossed the ocean in the same ship, and they had five children.
    John Park, son of Samuel and Margaret, was born December 18, 1758, and in 1777 came to

    Cecil township, Washington Co., Penn. In June, 1787, he married Sarah, daughter of Judge

    John McDowell, who resided in North Strabane township, this county. Their children were

    ten in number. John Park died May 31, 1832, and Sarah, his wife, passed away April 6,

    1857; their remains lie in the Chartiers graveyard.



    John McNary, son of the honored old Scotch pioneer, James, and grandfather of James S.,

    died as already stated in York county, after a visit to and a purchase of land in

    Washington county. his family consisted of wife ???(Esther Bogle, a native of Ireland)???,

    daughters: Elizabeth ???(wife of William Douglas)???, Jane ???(wife of Robert McKibben)???, Mary ???(wife

    of John McCoy)???, Margaret ???(wife of James Martin)???, Esther ???(wife of Thomas Ewing, and

    grandmother of Judge Ewing, of Pittsburgh)???, Agnes ???(wife of William Pollock)???, and Jennet

    ???(wife of James Marshall)???; and sons: James, Malcolm, John ???(father of James S.)???, Thomas and

    Alexander.
    contradicting--->>>>
    JOHN McNARY, son of James, the founder of the family, resided upon part of the homestead

    in Chanceford township, York Co., Penn. In 1801 he bought a farm in North Strabane

    township, Washington Co., Penn.; and upon going back for his family was taken sick and

    died there the same year, and was buried at Guinston, Penn. After his death the family

    removed to the new farm in 1802 ???(the eldest son, James, had preceded the family in 1798.

    He married Margaret Reed, daughter of Col. Joseph Reed, of the Colonial army, and located

    in Cross Creek township, Washington Co., Penn)???. In 1769 he was elected an elder in the

    Seceder Congregation of Guinston. He married Esther Boyle, and had thirteen children,

    viz.: Betsy, married to William Douglass, York county; Mary, married to James McCoy;

    James, married to Margaret Reed, and located in Cross Creek township, in 1798; Margaret,

    married to James Martin; Malcolm, married to Miss Beatty; Esther, married to Thomas Ewing;

    Agnes, married to William Pollock; John, married to Jane Hill, and lived upon the farm in

    Strabane township; Thomas, who died in infancy; Alexander, married to Margaret Pollock,

    and removed to Ohio; Thomas, who died in early life; Jane, married to James Marshall;

    Jennet, married to James McKibben. Numerous descendants of this son reside in the vicinity

    of Burgettstown and Canonsburg at the present time.

    same source chartiers.com
    Text taken from page 770 of:
    Beers, J. H. and Co., Commemorative Biographical Record of Washington County, Pennsylvania

    ???(Chicago: J. H. Beers & Co., 1893)???.

    Samuel Donahey was born in Buffalo township, Washington Co., Penn., about 1786, where he

    was reared to farm life, receiving his education at the schools of the neighborhood. In

    his early manhood he was married to Anna, daughter of William Reed, and to this union were

    born the following children: Joseph, William, Margaret ???(wife of Rev. J. M. Smith)???, Mary D.

    ???(Mrs. Vincent M. Blayney)???, Jane ???(wife of Rev. J. Marshall)??? and Anna ???(wife of Rev. J. M.

    shields)???. Samuel Donahey was a consistent member of the Presbyterian Church at Upper

    Buffalo, and at the time of his death, December 25, 1840, was an elder in the same.

    Politically we was originally a Whig, and afterward, on the formation of the party, a

    stanch Republican.

    ALEXANDER WILSON WICKERHAM was born December 20, 1852, and was reared on the home farm in

    Carroll township until thirteen years of age, when he moved to Monongahela. On April 17,

    1871, he married Rebecca, daughter of John Marshall, of a very old and highly respected

    family of Washington county, and after marriage he conducted his father's farm for several

    years. He then removed to his present home in East Bethlehem township, the farm containing

    some seventy acres of prime land. He is a Republican, but not active in politics. The

    children born to Mr. and Mrs. Wickerham are Sarah, Eudora Della, Archibald, May, Florence,

    Myrtle and Lizzie, all at home with their parents.


    Text taken from page 1444 of:
    Beers, J. H. and Co., Commemorative Biographical Record of Washington County, Pennsylvania

    ???(Chicago: J. H. Beers & Co., 1893)???.

    624. Nov. 28, 1823
    William Marshall to Rebecca Shaw. By Rev. John Graham.



    John Gourley, the subject proper of this biographical sketch, was born January 17, 1834,

    in Donegal township, Washington Co., Penn., and there received his education as well as

    early lessons in farm work. At the age of eighteen years he went to Warren county, Ill.,

    where he followed farming until 1862, and then removed to Donegal township, this county,

    and has here since resided. He lived on his farm until 1865, when he removed with his

    family to Claysville, where he has since resided, and where he owns one of the most

    handsome residences of the village. On March 13, 1860, he was married to Mary J., daughter

    of John Marshall, a member of one of the oldest families in Buffalo township, and the

    children by this union were Adele ???(wife of George M. Gray)??? and Mary ???(now deceased)???.




    Jacob Heidrick of Youghogania Co., Va., to James Marshel ???(Marshall?)??? of Westmoreland Co.,

    Pa., 400 acres in Youghogania Co., Va., Oct. 22, 1778.
    ???(Source: Deed Records in Washington Co., Pa. 1782-85.)???


    Washington County:
    Beeler's Fort ???(1778 - ?)???, Robinson Township, between Murdocksville and Bavington.
    Burgett's Blockhouse ???(1780 - ?)???, Burgettstown
    Catfish Camp Station ???(1778 - ?)???, Washington, the town was named Catfish Camp from 1770 -

    1781.
    Dillow's Fort ???(1780 - 1785?)???, Hanover Township, on Dilloe Run? It was still in use in

    1785.
    Dinsmore's Blockhouse ???(1794 - ?)???, Canton Township
    Enlow's Blockhouse ???(1775 - ?)???, East Finley Township
    Hoagland's Blockhouse ???(1780 - ?)???, Smith Township
    James Marshel's Blockhouse ???(1770's)???, Cross Creek Township, also spelled Marshall's.

    The first property to which title by deed was given was the public square sold for a site

    for the courthouse and prison of Washington County. This deed describes the property as

    ?lying in the town of Bassett Town,? and is the only one ever made containing such

    description. The next deed that appears of record was made by David Hoge to James

    Marshel, and conveyed lot No. 90 ???(now occupied by Morgan and Hargraves? store)???. This lot

    was sold by Marshel to Hugh Wilson on the 4th of January, 1786.


    STRABANE was an original township. For its erection reference is made to the history of

    South Strabane. The division of the township into North and South Strabane was made by

    order of court at the May term in the year 1831.

    The township was an independent district for the election of justices from its erection

    till 1803, when it was embraced with Washington as District No. 1, and so remained until

    1838, at which time it again became independent. The list of justices of old Strabane and

    of District No. 1 are here given from the first until 1838, from which time the justices

    only of North Strabane are mentioned:


    Alexander Eddie, July 15, 1781. James Blaine, Jan. 1,1817.
    Daniel Leet, July 15, 1781. Joshua Monroe, March 12, 1819.
    Nicholas Little, July 15, 1781. Richard Johnston, March 22, 1810.
    David Clark, July 15, 1751. Daniel Palmer, May 7, 1819.
    Henry Taylor, July 15, 1781. Matthew McNary, Dec. 4, 1820.
    John White, July 15, 1781. David Quail, Jan. 31, 1822.
    Matthew Ritchie, Oct. 6, 1784. John Marshall, May 20, 1822


    The town of Washington was originally in the township of Strabane, and the first election

    of the township was held at ?the house of David Hoge, at Catfish Camp.? The town remained

    under the jurisdiction of Strabane until 1785. On the 25th of September, in that year, a

    petition signed by several of the citizens of the town was presented to the Court of

    Quarter Sessions, requesting to be formed into a separate election district. The petition

    was granted; a certificate was sent to the Supreme Executive Council, and was confirmed by

    that body on the 6th of February, 1786. A petition for the erection of the town of

    Washington into a separate township is on file in the records of the court, and is

    indorsed on the back as follows: ?Petition of Inhabitants of the Town of Washington to be

    made a township. September Session. Granted by the Court.? The petition was signed by

    Alexander Addison, D. Bradford, James Ross, John Redick, John Hoge, and Reasin Beall.

    This petition is without date, but the action of the court was evidently in September,

    1788, as the first assessment-roll of Washington borough township that has been found was

    made April 20, 1789, and is probably the first one after its erection. The following

    names appear on the roll:



    John Atchison, Robert Atchison, John Adams, Samuel Acklin, David Bradford, Reazon Bell,

    Samuel Beard, Absalom Beard, Esq., James Chambers, Edward Coulter, Samuel Clark, Alexander

    Cunningham, John Culbertson, Thomas Clark, Peyton Cooke, John Dodd, John Douglas, Samuel

    David, John Flaek, William Faulkner, Hardman Horn, John Hoge, Esq., John Hughes, Thomas

    Jeffries, William Johnston, Daniel Kerr, William Kerr, Alexander Little, James, Linn,

    William Meetkirk, John McQuiston, Robert McKinley, William Marshall, Hugh Means, Kennedy

    Morton, Daniel Moody, Alexander McCoy, William Marts, William McCalmont, George McCormick,

    John McMichael, Daniel McGlaughlin, Patrick McNight, James McCoy, Sr., Anthony McConoughy,

    David Parkinson, John Purviance, David Redick, Esq., John Redick, Widow Roberts, Thomas

    Stokely, Esq., Samuel Shannon, Thomas Scott, Esq., Adam Sneider, ??? Sneider, Andrew

    Swearingen, William Sherrod, Widow Thompson, Charles Valentine, James Wilson, Sr., Hugh

    Wilson, Matthew Winton, James Workman, Widow Walker, Daniel Welch, Joseph Wherry, Hugh

    Workman, James Wilson, Jr., Thomas Woodward. Single men: Gabriel Bleakney, John Black,

    Alexander Beer, Edward Browner, Sandars Darby, George Douglas, Thomas Davis, James Ewing,

    Thomas Goudy, Joseph Hunt, Daniel Johnston, John Kerns, James Langley, William Linn, James

    McDermott, Walton Meads, Alexander McCoy, James McCoy, John McCoy, Thomas McQuiston, James

    McCluney, Alexander Miller, William Mitchell, Archibald McDonald, James Read, Benjamin

    Read, James Ross, James Rony, John Stokely, Benjamin Stokely, John Stevenson, Elisha

    Fulkerson, James Woods.

    Col. James Marshel, a settler in Cross Creek township, purchased lot No. 90 of David Hoge

    on a certificate, receiving his deed from Mr. Hoge in February, 1785. This lot was where

    Morgan & Hargreave?s store now stands. He sold it the next year to Hugh Wilson. He lived

    in the town during the terms of the various offices he held of county lieutenant,

    register, recorder, and sheriff. In 1794 the military headquarters were upon the lot he

    then lived on, and the United States forces were encamped on the college grounds.

    Samuel Johnston was a backwoodsman of Virginia, who came here in 1772 and made a tomahawk

    improvement. It is believed by many that he was the first person to invade and settle

    within the limits of Cross Creek township. It was through Col. James Marshel's assistance

    that Samuel Johnston later obtained the patent on his land, which is now owned by Thomas

    Marshall and Robert Jeffries. In 1817, Mr. Johnston sold it to David Martin, and removed

    to Wayne Co., Ohio, dying there soon afterwards. Descendants of Samuel Johnston in the

    families of Cummings, Ewing, and Henwood are still living in this vicinity.

    George Marques was among the early settlers on Cross Creek. On Nov. 1, 1776, he bought

    from Thomas Bay a tract of land on Cross Creek containing two hundred and sixty acres;

    also Sept. 18, 1787, he bought of John Marshall a tract of one hundred and ninety-six

    acres. He was one of the first elders in Cross Creek Presbyterian Church, and was leader

    of the music. He was a cousin of John and Rev. Thomas Marques. He afterwards sold his land

    and removed to Mercer County, Pa., in which section a number of his descendants still

    reside.
    http://www.chartiers.com/crumrine/twp-crosscreek.html


    http://www.chartiers.com/beers-project/articles/mclain-210.html
    JOSEPH RANKIN McLAIN, a citizen of Claysville, was born January 8, 1828, in Cross Creek

    township, Washington Co., Penn., a son of William and Margaret ???(McClelland)??? McLain.
    The family are of Scotch-Irish descent, the great-grandfather, William, having come to

    this country from the North of Ireland at a very early day, settling in Adams county,

    Penn. Two of his sons, who were civil engineers, assisted in locating the dividing line

    between Maryland and Pennsylvania, and his son, John, grandfather of Joseph R., was born

    about the year 1740, in Adams county, Penn., where he was reared to manhood and educated.

    When he had reached maturity he set out for the then "Far West," arriving finally about

    the year 1770, in Washington county. Here he married Hannah Marshall, of that county,

    after which they at once made their home on a farm near Canonsburg, where they remained

    some few years. The children born to this pioneer couple were: Joseph ???(who was in the

    service of the Government for the suppression of the Whiskey Insurrection, and died in the

    service)???, Mary ???(Mrs. John Rankin)???, William, Hannah ???(Mrs. John Hayes)???, and John. The father

    of this family died when He was yet a comparatively young man. He and his wife were

    members of the Presbyterian Church.





    At a meeting of the inhabitants of the town of Washington, assembled at the court-house at

    ring of bell on Wednesday, the 25th January, 1798, to consult whether it will be proper to

    introduce the smallpox into their families at this time, the following persons being

    present answered as follows, to wit:



    Mr. Redick in the chair; Isaac Kerr, secretary.



    Matthew Ritchie, no. John Mitchell, no.

    Samuel Arbuccle, no. John Johnston, no.

    Samuel Day, no. Isaiah Steen, no.

    David Morton, no. Samuel Clarke, no.

    Bruce Deckar, no. Robert Hamilton, no.

    Alex. Cunningham, no. John Simonson, no.

    Thomas Thomas, no. Alexander Addison, no.

    William Kerr, no. John Ustick, no.

    David Morris, no. William Marshal, no.

    John McCammant, no. William Sharard, yes.

    John Clark, no. Henry Tarr, no.

    Charles Fox, no. John Dehuff, no.

    John Wilson, no. David Redick, no.

    Joseph Huston, no.



    ?Resolved, That it is agreed that no person here present shall introduce the inoculation

    into their family without first having given like public notice as at this time, so that

    the inhabitants may have an opportunity of remonstrating against it, or take such measures

    as may be necessary.

    Fire Department. ? The first fire which occurred in the town of Washington of which any

    account is obtained was the burning of the log court-house in the winter of 1790-91. The

    accounts of the commissioners of 1791 contain the following: "To pay James Marshel for the

    use of his engine, $25." What kind of an engine was owned by Col. Marshel, or for what

    purpose he obtained it, is not known, as no further reference to it is found.

    On the 11th of February, 1837, the "Hope" and "Washington" Fire Companies were

    reorganized, and the following were elected officers of the Hope Fire Company: Director,

    John Marshel; Engineers, Oliver Witherow, Jacob Keisler; Captain of the Water Companies,

    Jacob Slagle; Captains of the Axe and Ladder Company, Peter Wolf and John Wilson; Property

    Guard, Alexander Sweeney, Alexander Reed, Daniel Moore; Secretary, Henry Langley. This

    company maintained an existence for about fifteen or twenty years, then disbanded.

    Blacksmiths: Matthew Collins, Robert Hamilton, John Laird, William Marshall, Joseph

    Seaman, William Wilson, and William Ward.

    http://www.chartiers.com/crumrine/twp-b-washington.html
    Samuel Marshall taught a school in 1822 in the Pine Alley school-house. Alexander Murdoch

    was one of the pupils in that year. Andrew Gwinn advertised to open a school on the first

    Monday of July 1822, in room No. 2 above the market-house. John Kerr advertised May 5,

    1823, that he had commenced an "English School" on Main Street, nearly opposite to the

    office of the Reporter, at the south end of Main Street.

    Obadiah Jennings advertised a school for young ladies to open May 1, 1824. This school

    was taught in a room above the Marshel house. The next year he advertised that he had

    engaged Samuel Marshall as assistant. Term to commence Oct. 3, 1825. Samuel Marshall

    advertised April 8, 1826, that he "opened an English school in the Pine Alley school-house

    in this borough."

    jefferson Township
    John Pogue came from Ireland to this section and lived on a tract of eighty-seven acres

    which he bought of Thomas Marshall, Oct. 5, 1791. It was a part of "Happy Retreat," which

    was patented to

    James Marshall, Sept. 26, 1786.


    On January 8, 1857, he was united in marriage with Susan R. Marshall, who was born in

    1835, in Queen Anne's county, Md., daughter of Stewart and Maria ???(Tittle)??? Marshall.

    Stewart Marshall was born in Cross Creek township, a son of William Marshall, who came

    from Ireland to America when twelve years old, and died in Cross Creek township. Stewart

    Marshall, who was a stone mason, was married in Baltimore to Maria Little, and by her had

    four children: Elizabeth, in Midway; Louisa, widow of John Robertson, of Cross Creek

    village; Susan R., Mrs. Pressly Leech; and Sarah, wife of John Barnes, living in Jefferson

    county, Iowa. Mr. Marshall died in Iowa, his wife in Maryland. Mrs. Leech spent her

    girlhood in Baltimore, and after coming to Pennsylvania taught school for a time in Cross

    Creek township prior to her marriage. The children of Pressly and Susan R. ???(Marshall)???

    Leech are Lizzie Wishart ???(living at home)???, Susan L. ???(wife of William McIlvaine, of Mount

    Pleasant township)???, James P. ???(a farmer of Smith township living on the old grandfather

    Leech farm)???, Robert V. ???(deceased in youth)???, John C. ???(residing with his parents)???, Linda E.

    ???(a graduate of California (Penn.)??? College, now teaching school in Mt. Pleasant township),

    J. Gibson and Ernest A. ???(living at home)???.










    33. Mary ???(Marshal)??? MARSHEL, born Bef. 1769 in Grayson County, Kentucky; died July 07, 1789

    in Mercer County, Kentucky. She was the daughter of 66. James MARSHEL and 67. Elizabeth.

    Child of Christian WEEDMAN and Mary MARSHEL is:
    16 i. Stephen WEEDMAN, born Abt. 1806 in Grayson County, Kentucky; died

    Abt. 1866; married Mary Ann GILBERT 1824.
    http://genforum.genealogy.com/weedman/messages/25.html

    Margaret Wilson, the second daughter of Hugh Wilson, became the wife of
    John Marshel, the son of Col James Marshel. He was sheriff of the county
    in 1835 and before the expiration of the term was appointed cashier of
    the Franklin Bank, now First National. This position he retained until
    1857 when he resigned and returned to a farm near Washington where he
    died. Mrs Dr Matthew H Clark of Washington, and Mrs S A Clark of
    Pittsburgh are his daughters.
    Hugh Wilson, in addition to the property obtained from his father
    purchased from James Marshel in 1786 a lot on which now stands
    Morgan & Hargreaves's store.

    http://www.whiskeyrebellion.org/brad91.html

    http://archiver.rootsweb.com/th/read/PAMONVAL/2003-02/1044809683



    James Marshel of Washington County PA

    participated in the whiskey rebellions

    James Marshel, an old veteran of the Indian wars

    Marshel, James ???(1753-1829)???
    Pennsylvania legislator and public official.

    Settled in western Pennsylvania shortly before the Revolution. Justice of the peace

    ???(1777)???. Washington County register and recorder ???(1781-84)???. Sheriff ???(1784-87)???. Delegate to

    the Pennsylvania convention to ratify the U.S. Constitution ???(1787)???; opposed ratification.

    Member of the Pennsylvania Assembly ???(1789-90)???.

    James Marshel was appointed county lieutenant and he set to work to establish the

    Pennsylvania jurisdiction in a region where most of the inhabitants were Virginians.

    while Marshel and his adherents were just a s active to defeat the Virginia project.


    P. 137 Colonel Marshel wrote to Philadelphia: "Cox and his party have taken and confined a

    considerable number of the inhabitants of this county; in a word, the instances of high

    treason against the state are too many to be enumerated." Thomas Scott, an honored leader

    among the pioneers, wrote that Clark's conduct had been "highly oppressive and abusive,."

    adding, " The particulars are numerous and horrid."11


    James Marshel "moved to the western country some three years prior to the

    Revolution, and settled in what is now Cross Creek Township." Frontiersman and local

    officer.
    http://www.bsos.umd.edu/gvpt/mcintosh/770/beard/beard_ch10.htm

    1813 Petition by "the inhabitants on Chickesawhay River" ???(Washington County)??? MARSHEL,

    James
    http://www.trackingyourroots.com/data/1813wash.htm


    His son, John Marshel, who died in 186-, was for many years

    a well known resident of Washington, Pennsylvania, cashier of

    the old Franklin Bank, a man of much intelligence and integrity

    of character,


    letters from James Marshel to Benjamin Franklin

    http://franklinpapers.org/franklin/framedVolumes.jsp?vol=45&page=250

    From James Marshel ???(unpublished)???
    Philadelphia, 6th Nov., 1787.
    Sir,
    From late and authentic Accounts from the County of Washington, two families, Consisting

    of seven persons in each, six of whom, in each family, have been lately killed and

    scalped, and the remaining two persons taken prisoners by the Indians. This Circumstance,

    together with others of a like nature, in the neighbouring Counties in Virginia, I find

    has much alarmed the Inhabitants of Washington County. We are at present in a very bad

    situation for Defence, and our Circumstances in general, more Especially that of the

    frontier Inhabitants, is such that very few are able to purchase even a Small Quantity of

    Ammunition. Besides, the frontier people of that County have suffered Considerably in the

    late war, and are by no means able to make so noble a stand as they then did. Permit me

    therefore to observe, that if the Indians continue their Depredations as in all

    probability they will, it will be less expensive and much more advantageous to the state

    to support the present line of frontier than to suffer the enemy to penetrate into the

    Country. The Major part of the frontier Inhabitants are anured to the Business, and as to

    Indian Incursions are as much preferable to the people in the Interior parts of the State

    as old Veteran Troops are to young recruits. I would also observe that in Washington

    County we have a very extended frontier, I think not less than one hundred miles all

    equally exposed. That in my opinion it will require at least one hundred men even to watch

    the approach of the Enemy, and that if two hundred active woods men were employed under

    the command of Experienced Officers it would probably be a sufficient inducement to the

    frontiers to make a Stand. I well know the circumstances of the people on the frontiers

    and that however well disposed they may be to support the Government as well as preserve

    their property, yet I am assured that without the special aid of Government, a very

    Considerable part of Washington County will be Evacuated should the Indians make

    incursions on our, or the neighbouring frontiers next spring, the people do not believe

    the Indians will discriminate between Pennsylvanians and the citizens of any other State,

    and the fact is they have not done it in their late depredations, for the last family they

    destroyed lived within thirteen or fourteen miles of the Center of Washington County.

    Since I began to write I have had an account of Another family being killed in Washington

    County, near Pittsburg; this will, no doubt, also alarm the people of Westmoreland County,

    as they are Equally Exposed with us, and I Believe are in no better situation for Defence.

    I hope, therefore, that your Excellency and your Hon?ble Board will provide for the

    preservation and safety of our frontiers, and that the people may have timely notice

    thereof, that Instead of preparing to remove to a place of safety, they may prepare such

    places of safety on the present line of frontiers as they may think most advisable. I have

    the Honor to be, With the highest Respect, Your Excellency?s most obedient And very Humble

    servant,

    James Marshel,
    Lieut. Wt. Co?y.

    Directed, On public service. His Excellency, President Franklin, Philadelphia.




    From James Marshall ???(unpublished)???
    Philadelphia 22nd. August 1788.
    Sir
    From numerous applications by the frontier Inhabitants in the County of Washington,

    Especially in that part of the County where the famlies were killed last fall, I found it

    necessary early in the Spring to Order on duty about twenty men and to Continue from time

    to time nearly that number. As there has been no provision made for Victualing our Militia

    when in Actual service I have been Obliged to make myself liable for the greatest part of

    Victualing Expended in that way and in some Instances have been Under the necessity of

    advancing Cash. I therefore hope your Honble Board will make such provision as may be

    necessary for Supplying the Militia that may be Called into Actual service in future as

    well as for paying the Supplies already made. I have the Honor to be with the Highest

    Respect your Excellencys most Obedient and Verry Humble servant

    Jams. Marshel

    Lieut. W. Coy

    His Excellency President Franklin
    Addressed: His Excellency Benjamin Franklin Esquire / President / Philadelphia / On

    publick service
    Endorsed: 1788 August 22nd: From James Marshall Esquire Lieutenant of the County of

    Washington


    letters from James Marshel to Benjamin Franklin

    http://franklinpapers.org/franklin/framedVolumes.jsp?vol=45&page=250

    From James Marshel ???(unpublished)???
    Philadelphia, 6th Nov., 1787.
    Sir,
    From late and authentic Accounts from the County of Washington, two families, Consisting

    of seven persons in each, six of whom, in each family, have been lately killed and

    scalped, and the remaining two persons taken prisoners by the Indians. This Circumstance,

    together with others of a like nature, in the neighbouring Counties in Virginia, I find

    has much alarmed the Inhabitants of Washington County. We are at present in a very bad

    situation for Defence, and our Circumstances in general, more Especially that of the

    frontier Inhabitants, is such that very few are able to purchase even a Small Quantity of

    Ammunition. Besides, the frontier people of that County have suffered Considerably in the

    late war, and are by no means able to make so noble a stand as they then did. Permit me

    therefore to observe, that if the Indians continue their Depredations as in all

    probability they will, it will be less expensive and much more advantageous to the state

    to support the present line of frontier than to suffer the enemy to penetrate into the

    Country. The Major part of the frontier Inhabitants are anured to the Business, and as to

    Indian Incursions are as much preferable to the people in the Interior parts of the State

    as old Veteran Troops are to young recruits. I would also observe that in Washington

    County we have a very extended frontier, I think not less than one hundred miles all

    equally exposed. That in my opinion it will require at least one hundred men even to watch

    the approach of the Enemy, and that if two hundred active woods men were employed under

    the command of Experienced Officers it would probably be a sufficient inducement to the

    frontiers to make a Stand. I well know the circumstances of the people on the frontiers

    and that however well disposed they may be to support the Government as well as preserve

    their property, yet I am assured that without the special aid of Government, a very

    Considerable part of Washington County will be Evacuated should the Indians make

    incursions on our, or the neighbouring frontiers next spring, the people do not believe

    the Indians will discriminate between Pennsylvanians and the citizens of any other State,

    and the fact is they have not done it in their late depredations, for the last family they

    destroyed lived within thirteen or fourteen miles of the Center of Washington County.

    Since I began to write I have had an account of Another family being killed in Washington

    County, near Pittsburg; this will, no doubt, also alarm the people of Westmoreland County,

    as they are Equally Exposed with us, and I Believe are in no better situation for Defence.

    I hope, therefore, that your Excellency and your Hon?ble Board will provide for the

    preservation and safety of our frontiers, and that the people may have timely notice

    thereof, that Instead of preparing to remove to a place of safety, they may prepare such

    places of safety on the present line of frontiers as they may think most advisable. I have

    the Honor to be, With the highest Respect, Your Excellency?s most obedient And very Humble

    servant,

    James Marshel,
    Lieut. Wt. Co?y.

    Directed, On public service. His Excellency, President Franklin, Philadelphia.




    From James Marshall ???(unpublished)???
    Philadelphia 22nd. August 1788.
    Sir
    From numerous applications by the frontier Inhabitants in the County of Washington,

    Especially in that part of the County where the famlies were killed last fall, I found it

    necessary early in the Spring to Order on duty about twenty men and to Continue from time

    to time nearly that number. As there has been no provision made for Victualing our Militia

    when in Actual service I have been Obliged to make myself liable for the greatest part of

    Victualing Expended in that way and in some Instances have been Under the necessity of

    advancing Cash. I therefore hope your Honble Board will make such provision as may be

    necessary for Supplying the Militia that may be Called into Actual service in future as

    well as for paying the Supplies already made. I have the Honor to be with the Highest

    Respect your Excellencys most Obedient and Verry Humble servant

    Jams. Marshel

    Lieut. W. Coy

    His Excellency President Franklin
    Addressed: His Excellency Benjamin Franklin Esquire / President / Philadelphia / On

    publick service
    Endorsed: 1788 August 22nd: From James Marshall Esquire Lieutenant of the County of

    Washington



    http://www.chartiers.com/crumrine/revolution.htm


    It was not Clarke?s purpose or desire to recognize the Pennsylvania county of Washington

    ???(which had then recently been erected but not organized)??? or its officers, so he applied to

    the officers in command of the militia of the so-called Virginia counties of Yohogania,

    Monongalia, and Ohio to aid him in securing men for the expedition. The result in

    Yohogania was a meeting of the officers1 of that county, June 5th, at the old court-house,

    near Andrew Heath?s, on the west side of the Monongahela, above and in sight of the

    present town of Elizabeth, at which meeting a draft of one-fifth of the militia of said

    county ???(which, according to the Virginia claim, included the north half of Washington

    County, Pa., and all of Westmoreland as far south as the centre of the present county of

    Fayette)??? was made for the expedition. The people, however, believing that the territory

    claimed by Virginia as Yohogania County was really in the jurisdiction of Pennsylvania,

    denied the authority of the Virginia officers, and refused to submit to the draft until

    the question of jurisdiction was definitely settled. But the public notice given by

    Christopher Hays to the people of Westmoreland and Washington that he held in his hands

    money from the Executive Council to be expended for the protection of the frontier had the

    effect to quiet to a great extent, though not entirely to allay, the dissatisfaction, and

    the work of raising men in the two Pennsylvania counties ???(or, as Gen. Clarke expressed it,

    in Yohogania, Monongalia, and Ohio Counties, Va.)??? was allowed to proceed, though not

    without strong and bitter protest.

    1 This meeting and its proceeding were mentioned in a letter from James Marshel ???(county

    lieutenant of Washington)??? to President Reed, as follows:

    ?Washington

    County, June 27, 1781.

    ?Sr ? Since I had the honour of Addressing your Excellency last, the old Enemies of his

    government and their adherents have exerted themselves to the Utmost to prevent this

    County being organized. On the 5th Inst. a Council of the Militia officers of Yohagena

    County was held at their Court-house, and in Consequence of sd Council, the fifth part of

    the Militia of sd County was drafted for General Clark?s Expedition, but the people did

    not Conceive they were Under the Jurisdiction of Virginia, therefore they denied their

    Authority, and almost Universally Refused doing duty under any government whatever until

    the line between the States is actually run.? ? Pa. Arch., 1781-83, p. 233.

    The main part of the force destined for Gen. Clarke?s expedition ???(that is to say, nearly

    all except about one hundred and fifty men furnished by Westmoreland, under Col. Lochry

    and Capt. Benjamin Whaley, as will be mentioned hereafter)??? was raised in Washington

    County, but it appears evident from certain correspondence of that time that this was

    accomplished, not by the action of the Washington County military authorities, but by the

    officers of the so-called Virginia counties which covered the territory of Washington.

    That there was a bitter quarrel at that time between James Marshel, lieutenant of the

    newly-erected ???(but unorganized)??? county of Washington, and Dorsey Pentecost ???(successor of

    Col. Joseph Beeler in the office of county lieutenant of Yohogania, Va.)??? is evident from

    the recriminating letters written by both these gentlemen to the president of the Supreme

    Executive Council. Pentecost declared ???(and no denial of the assertion is found in

    Marshel's correspondence)??? that it was chiefly through his energy and efforts that Gen.

    Clarke?s main force was raised. And that force was raised by some means, and placed in

    camp in a short space of time after the meeting of officers at the Yohogania court-house

    and subsequent refusal of the people to submit to the draft there ordered, is made

    apparent in a letter written by Col. Pentecost to President Reed, dated ?Washington

    County, July 27, 1781.?2 In that letter he says ?

    2 Pa. Archives, 1781-83, pp. 315-19.

    ?While Mr. Marshel was at Philadelphia, Gen?l Clarke came here with an Intent to carry an

    Expedition against the Savages, which was principally intended to have been aided by

    Volunteer from this County. He consulted myself with many others on the most probable

    Plan for Success. Every Effort was tried, but to no effect; the Frontiers were murdered

    every Day & the Militia could not be got out. The Field Officers for Yohogania County

    called on me & requested that I would take the Command of the same, & endeavor to save it

    from utter Destruction. I accordingly swore into a Commission for that Purpose which had

    been in the County upwards of a Year, & which I had neglected to qualify to, on account of

    the apparent Probability there was for a Change of Government. Soon after this, Gen?l

    Clark had a meeting of the Principal People to consult on the most Plausible Plan to raise

    the Militia for his Expedition. They, after long Deliberation, Resolved that nothing

    could effect so desirable a Plan save my Exertions as County Lieut of Yohogania, and in

    the most pointed Terms ???(in an address to me)??? requested that I would put my Command in

    Force, and use every Exertion to facilitate the Expedition. The Day following, I was

    furnished with a Demand from Gen?l Clark for the Quota of the County. I went into the

    Business with Resolution, conducted myself with a steady Firmness, and with a great Deal

    of Fatigue, Trouble, & Perplexity, have accomplished that Business, and the Militia are

    now encampt.? In another part of the same communication he says, ?I am now in General

    Clarke?s Camp, about three miles below Fort Pitt, and am about to leave this Country on

    the Expedition under that Gentleman?s Command.? And he further says, with regard to the

    course which had been pursued by Col. Marshel with reference to the raising of men for

    Clarke?s expedition: ?And he accordingly did all he could to perplex the People, and

    advised them to pay no obedience to Draughts that I had ordered for Gen?l Clark?s

    assistance, & has actually offered Protection to some of ?em, though he before, on a

    Request of Gen?l Clark?s, declared he could do nothing as an officer, wish?d well the

    Expedition, & as a Private Person would give every assistance to promote it.?

    There is no doubt that in the enforcement of the draft ordered from the militia by the

    lieutenants of Yohogania and Monongalia Counties Gen. Clarke pursued the business with

    great vigor, and showed very little leniency toward those ???(and they were many)??? who were

    inclined to deny the jurisdiction of Virginia.1 Many bitter complaints were made against

    him for his stern methods of enforcing the draft, among which complaints in that

    particular are the charges made against him ???(as also against Dorsey Pentecost)??? in the

    following letter, addressed by Col. James Marshel to the president of the Council,2 viz.:

    1 Many of those people who had been willing and anxious for the establishment of

    Virginia?s claim, so that they might purchase their lands from her at one-tenth part of

    the price demanded by Pennsylvania Land-Office, were now quite as ready to deny her right

    to demand military service from them.

    2 Pa. Arch., 1781-83, pp. 343-45.


    shown on wills

    Washington County, S.S.
    On the 23rd day of November, 1793. before me, James Marshel, Esq, Register for
    Probate of Wills and Granting Letters of Administration in aforesaid County,
    personally came Lot Leonard, Bernard Eagon, and James Eagon, subscribing
    witnesses within named, and on their solomn oaths did dispose and say that they
    were personally present and saw and heard Thomas Reinhart, the testator within
    named, sign, seal, and publish, pronounce, and declare the within instrument in
    writing as and for his last will and testament and at the time of doing thereof,
    he was of sound and well disposing mind, memory, and understanding to the best
    of their knowledge, observation, and belief. Sworn before James Marshel, Esq.
    Executoes sworn at same time. Signed James Marshel



    1860 McDowell Twp., Barry Co., MO

    http://www.rootsweb.com/~mobarry/data/1860census/1860mcdowell.htm

    846. 832. Alen Marshel, 32, Farmer, Virginia, Male ???[Allen Marshall]???
    Charlotte Marshel, 19, Virginia, Female
    Juley Ann Marshel, 10, Virginia, Female
    James Marshel, 9, Virginia, Male
    Samuel Marshel, 7, Virginia, Male
    William H. Marshel, 4, Virginia, Male
    Matilda F. Marshel, 3, Virginia, Female
    Martha J. Marshel, 1, Virginia, Female






    From the The Reporter, Washington Co., Pa., Tuesday September 3, 1833 Vol 1 No 9

    The Democratic Antimasonic Convention of Washington met Monday Sept 2,
    1833 in Washington, PA. Participants felt convention was very
    successful; details of the proceedings will be in next newspaper
    ???[Tuesday Sept 10]???. "Democratic Antimasonic Ticket Assembly. JOHN H.
    EWING, JOSEPH HENDERSON, JESSE COOPER; Commissioner, JAMES M'QUOWN;
    Auditor, JOHN MARSHAL???(sic)???; Director of the Poor, JOHN URIE."

    Within the article, several names are mentioned. Such as: "If however
    the peaceful and moral community of PITTSBURGH can tolerate such
    proceedings and such language as the following ???[letter]???, we can assure
    MR. ALLEN that the strong arm of the Law and public opinion in
    Washington, will protect him from outrage." The letter that follows that
    paragraph, and titled "From the Pittsburgh Mercury" is directed to a MR.
    SNOWDEN. ???[Both are debates about Masons, in flowery language of?

    Mens 1783

    John Farral
    15. John Farral was killed by Indians in 1789. Reynolds, 124
    James Marshel

    William Dove

    Thomas Winn

    John Suleven
    16. Possibly Captain John Sullivan, one of Clark's officers.

    http://genealogytrails.com/ill/1787listofamericans.html

    Capt Sullivan is in the tree of Aaron Marshall/Marshel?
  • Residence: 19 FEB 1791 Washington County PA
  • Note:


    1791---Fire Department. ? The first fire which occurred in the town of Washington of which any account is obtained was the burning of the log court-house in the winter of 1790-91. The accounts of the commissioners of 1791 contain the following: "To pay James Marshel for the use of his engine, $25." What kind of an engine was owned by Col. Marshel, or for what purpose he obtained it, is not known, as no further reference to it is found.
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  • Residence: 1772-1778 Washington Township PA
  • Note:
    links
    http://books.google.com/books?id=400OAAAAIAAJ&q=marshel&dq=marshel&pgis=1

    These people of Western PA/VA wanted to have another state of their
    own but it did not work out.

    the county of Washington, then embraced, according to the Virginia claim, in the county of Augusta of that colony, and partly, according to Pennsylvania?s claim, in her county of Westmoreland


    James Marshel was a follower of Benjamin Franklin as clearly shown by the letters he wrote to him. Franklin did not agree with Washington and the other Federalists ?????(ie:John Justice Marshall)?????
    note:For four years there was an American state called Franklin, which was declared in 1784 by settlers living in what's now the northeastern region of Tennessee, and although it was never formally recognized by the rest of the country, it had a governor, a legislature, a constitution and a court.
    The State of Franklin existed from 1784 to 1789
    http://www.google.com/search?q=%22state+of+franklin%22&hl=en&start=20&sa=N
    parts of Washington Co. VA/PA may have been considered with this state. I am looking at/for maps

    James' letters were 1787 to "His Excellency President Franklin"

    Opponents Of Ratification included
    James Marshel "moved to the western country some three years prior to the Revolution, and settled in what is now Cross Creek Township." Frontiersman and local officer.

    Marshel, James ???????(1753-1829)???????
    Pennsylvania legislator and public official.

    James was involved heavily in the "Whiskey Insurrection" as one of the rebels-----Crumrine

    James was considered a "RADICAL" "insurgent" and a real democrat, not in the definition as todays. He was AGAINST, the Republicans and Federalists. -----Crumrine emphasis added

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Settled in western Pennsylvania shortly before the Revolution. Justice of the peace ???????(1777)???????. Washington County register and recorder ???????(1781-84)???????. Sheriff ???????(1784-87)???????. Delegate to the Pennsylvania convention to ratify the U.S. Constitution ???????(1787)???????; opposed ratification. Member of the Pennsylvania Assembly ???????(1789-90)???????.


    James Marshel was appointed county lieutenant and he set to work to establish the Pennsylvania jurisdiction in a region where most of the inhabitants were Virginians. while Marshel and his adherents were just a s active to defeat the Virginia project.
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    James Marshel, a newcomer, went to Philadelphia, had Washington
    County erected and himself commisioned lieutenant, recorder, and register.
    Took petitions of people to have Wash CO formed

    March 1781 Washington Co. first county cut off of Westmoreland CO.
    Fought for Pennsylvania against Virginia for this land
  • Occupation: Sheriff
  • CORP: Washington County PA 26 OCT 1784 Washington County PA
  • Note:
    In 1793 a change was made in the military system, and under this change the office of county lieutenant was abolished and the duties performed by brigade inspectors

    resigned as Lt. of county and was commisioned
    sheriff until 1789

    September 19, 1784 - George Washington, an absentee landlord, begins to takes action to remove Scottish settler from his land on Miller's Run, a branch of Chartiers Creek, in Washington, Cty. PA.

    http://www.whiskeyrebellion.org/timeline.htm
  • Occupation: County Lieutenant April 2, 1781 Washington County PA
  • Note:
    the PA VA disputes were settled in 1780

    James Marshel was appointed Lt. and he set to work to establish
    the Pennsylvania jurisdiction in a region where most of the
    inhabitants were Virginians. Such men as Col. Pentecost, John Canon, Gabriel Cox, and Daniel Leet worked hard to muster men for Gen.
    Clark, while Marshel and his adherents were just as active to defeat the Virginia project.

    Old Westmoreland : a history of western Pennsylvania during the Revolution / by Edgar W. Hassler.

    http://books.google.com/books?id=CxoLAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA38&dq=catfish+camp+pennsylvania#PPA149,M1
    Dec'r 19, 1781
    James requests and recieves gunpowder, lead and flints for defense of the frontier

    http://books.google.com/books?id=CxoLAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA38&dq=catfish+camp+pennsylvania#PPA245,M1
    March 30 1782
    James states that there were "irregularities" in the election!! LOL
  • Occupation: Recorder of Wills and Deeds 1791-1795 Washington County PA
  • Residence: 14 AUG 1794 Washington County PA
  • MAP:
  • LATI: N40.2
  • LONG: W79.9
  • Note:
    I ?(Joe Marshall)? believe this was all about some 21 million dollars the government thought they could make off these people on the other side of the mountains.

    http://www.bucklinsociety.net/Whiskey_Rebellion.htm
    http://cip.cornell.edu/Dienst/UI/1.0/Summarize/psu.ph/1134143651
    http://www.ttb.gov/public_info/whisky_rebellion.shtml

    Parkinson's Ferry meeting and/or Aug 20 1794 or more meetings
    the Whiskey Insurrection
    ??????????(Williamsport and Parkinson's Ferry were the previous names of the town; the name was changed to Monongahela City, April 1, 1837)??????????
    the first bridge, Williamsport Bridge, which replaced Parkinson's Ferry in 1836

    this was a meeting and protest regarding high taxes on
    stills. The people used the whiskey to trade for food
    and goods so they did not want to be taxed on it, or
    at least pay a lower tax than was in effect.
    This was a pretty large rebellion in the new USA
    They were called the "Whisky Boys" and "insurgents"

    President George Washington ended up "sending the
    military forces westward" with over 6000 men

    well when they saw and heard that all this was coming,
    there was another "late night meeting" and then a
    letter was sent to the commander of the troops
    and another back to the other side.
    The troops were ordered to move on Nov 4 to Peterson's
    farm near Parkinson's Ferry. Another contingent moved in
    from another side. Notices were given to
    Justices of the Peace to open books and all the people
    should come and swear an oath of allegiance. Then offices of inspection for the distillers were opened. And with all the
    troops around them, the people quickly acceded. The army
    quickly left but left a detachment there til the following
    spring, until order was full restored.

    condensed from
    Title: Annals of southwestern Pennsylvania, by Lewis Clark Walkinshaw ... Vol. 2.
    Author: Walkinshaw, Lewis Clark.
    online at http://digital.library.pitt.edu

    in the end:
    1794 Pennsylvania oath of allegiance
    Cross Creek, 11 Sep. 1794 - presence of William Rea, Aaron Lyle, Thomas Patterson, Commissioners.
    John Marshall
    John Marshall
    James Marshall
    Robert Marshall
    -------------------------------------------------------------
  • Residence: 1813 Washington County PA
  • Note:
    James Marshel of Washington County PA
    participated in the whiskey rebellions
    an old veteran of the Indian wars

    1813 Petition by "the inhabitants on Chickesawhay River" (Washington County) MARSHEL, James
  • Residence: est 1772 Cross Creek Twp., Washington Township, PA
  • MAP:
  • LATI: N40.31
  • LONG: W80.6
  • Note:
    Also considered Yohogania County West Augusta District Virginia
    Catfish Camp
    http://books.google.com/books?id=qLDVsTGxDQcC&pg=PA73&dq=%22catfish+camp%22&as_brr=1



    James Marshel's Blockhouse ????????(1770's)????????, Cross Creek Township,
    also spelled Marshall's.
    http://www.geocities.com/naforts/pawest.html

    Washington County was very large at this time. It was the frontier.
    somewhere there could be remains of the fort
    to the right a few miles, the creek has been made int a reservoir

    James Marshel's Blockhouse is marked with yellow arrow
  • Residence: 1778 Washington County PA
  • MAP:
  • LATI: N40.31
  • LONG: W80.6
  • Note:
    the google map should go to the spot
    Jacob Heidrick of Youghogania Co., Va., to James Marshel ??(Marshall?)?? of Westmoreland Co., Pa., 400 acres in Youghogania Co., Va., Oct. 22, 1778.
    ??(Source: Deed Records in Washington Co., Pa. 1782-85.)??

    William Casselman of Westmoreland Co., Pa. to John Marshel ??(Marshall?)?? of Lancaster Co., Pa., 400 acres on the headwaters of Cross Creek in Youghogania Co. and Ohio Co., Va., Dec. 21, 1778.
    ??(Source: Deed Records in Washington Co., Pa. 1782-85.)??
  • Residence: 1785 Strabane Twp, Washington County PA
  • Note:
    Col. James Marshel, a settler in Cross Creek township, purchased lot No. 90 of David Hoge on a certificate, receiving his deed from Mr. Hoge in February, 1785. This lot was where Morgan & Hargreave?s store now stands. He sold it the next year to Hugh Wilson. He lived in the town during the terms of the various offices he held of county lieutenant, register, recorder, and sheriff. In 1794 the military headquarters were upon the lot he then lived on, and the United States forces were encamped on the college grounds.

    Samuel Johnston was a backwoodsman of Virginia, who came here in 1772 and made a tomahawk improvement. It is believed by many that he was the first person to invade and settle within the limits of Cross Creek township. It was through Col. James Marshel's assistance that Samuel Johnston later obtained the patent on his land, which is now owned by Thomas Marshall and Robert Jeffries. In 1817, Mr. Johnston sold it to David Martin, and removed to Wayne Co., Ohio, dying there soon afterwards. Descendants of Samuel Johnston in the families of Cummings, Ewing, and Henwood are still living in this vicinity.


    1785 ----The town of Washington was originally in the township of Strabane, and the first election of the township was held at ?the house of David Hoge, at Catfish Camp.? The town remained under the jurisdiction of Strabane until 1785. On the 25th of September, in that year, a petition signed by several of the citizens of the town was presented to the Court of Quarter Sessions, requesting to be formed into a separate election district. The petition was granted; a certificate was sent to the Supreme Executive Council, and was confirmed by that body on the 6th of February, 1786. A petition for the erection of the town of Washington into a separate township is on file in the records of the court, and is indorsed on the back as f
  • _MILI: JAMES MARSHEL TO GOVERNOR MIFFLIN. 1791
  • Note:
    more here
    http://www.rootsweb.com/~usgenweb/pa/1pa/paarchivesseries/series2/vol4/defence/defence1.htm


    JAMES MARSHAL TO GOVERNOR MIFFLIN.

    WASHINGTON, 19th February, 1791.

    SIR:?Inclosed is a Return of the Off




    Marriage 1 Mary wife of James Marshel b: est 1755
    • Change Date: 19 FEB 2007
    Children
    1. Has Children John Marshel b: est 1783
    2. Has Children Jane Marshel
    3. Has No Children Elizabeth Eliza Marshel
    4. Has No Children Margaret Marshel
    5. Has No Children Cynthia Marshel
    6. Has No Children Robert Marshel

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    AaronMarshall1740-1826 Aaron Marshall website
    I would like to connect with all my lines from Marshall/Marshel/Marshal, Snowden, Van Swearingen, also looking for someone in Col. James Marshel family

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