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  • ID: I574391199
  • Name: Morgan McClellan BARTON
  • Given Name: Morgan McClellan
  • Surname: Barton
  • Sex: M
  • Birth: 9 FEB 1843 in Bedford County, Pennsylvania
  • Death: 12 MAY 1929 in Pennsylvania
  • Burial: Akersville Cemetery, Brush Creek Twp. Fulton Co. Pennsylvania
  • Note:
    Morgan McClelland Barton served in the Civil War, in Company M, 22nd Pennsylvania Volunteers Cavalry. Morgan is buried in Akersville Cemetery. Akersville Cemetery is located at the intersection of South Valley Road, Piper Road and Pleasant Valley Road in the Brush Creek Township of Fulton County, PA.

    Fulton County was created on April 19, 1851 from part of Bedford County and named for inventor Robert Fulton. When Morgan Barton was born Crystal Spring was in Bedford County, when he died Crystal Spring was in Fulton County.

    The Central Pennsylvania dialect is most prevalent in Bedford and Fulton counties.

    --------

    Military Service: Co. M, 22nd Pennsylvania Volunteers Calvary
    Burial: Akersville Cemetery, Brush Creek Twp. Fulton Co. PA

    History of the 22nd Regiment, Philadelphia Light Guard

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    Picture of Morgan's gravestone

    Morgan McClelland Barton memorial

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    From a Barton History:
    Mahlon Barton, Sr., married Anna James in 1826 and they had 12 children. Of their sons, M. Morgan, was a Civil War veteran and a church worker.

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    History of Bedford, Somerset and Fulton Counties, Pennsylvania; Chicago: Waterman, Watkins & Co., 1884, pp. 656
    [Chapter XCI, Brush Creek]:

    Mahlon Barton was born and reared in the house where he now lives. The house was built by Elijah Barton about 1800. Mahlon was married in 1826, to Anna James, of Brush Creek, and has reared eight daughters and four sons, all living except one son, Asa. Three of the sons were in the army -- Asa, Co. H, 208th Penn. regt. (submitters note: this can not be the right regiment as the 208th was formed in 1864; per the soldiers of the Civil War lookup page provided by the National Parks Service, Asa Barton actually served with the 77th Regiment of the Pennsylvania Infantry.), died in hospital at Nashville; James served in Co. H, 158th regt. Penn. Vols., and Morgan in Co. M, 22d Penn. Cav. Mahlon Barton was one of the pioneers of Methodism, and served as class-leader for twenty-five years. His descendants are quite numerous -- eleven children, ninety grandchildren and twenty-eight great-grandchildren, living.

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    22nd PA Regiment Organization, Service & Battles:

    * Organized at Philadelphia and mustered in April 23, 1861.
    * Moved to Baltimore, Md., May 17.
    * Duty near Fort McHenry, Locust Point, Patterson's Park and Mt. Clair till August 1861.
    * Mustered out August 7, 1861.

    --------

    From Days Gone By, the Fulton County News:

    From The Files of May 30, 1929 '29 Deaths: Morgan M. Barton of Bedford County, a Civil War veteran.

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    Fulton County Pennsylvania Heritage:

    Settlement of Fulton County began as early as 1719 and was influenced by the settlement patterns of our first pioneers.

    By 1850, many residents of this region wished to create a new county from the eastern edge of Bedford County. The original draft of the Pennsylvania House of Representative bill provided that the new county be named Liberty; however, the passage of the bill in the Senate depended upon the action of Senator Parker of Lycoming County. He agreed to support the bill provided he be allowed to name the county. This proposition was accepted, and thus on April 19, 1850 the new county became Fulton instead of Liberty. The name was chosen in recognition of Robert Fulton of Lancaster, Pennsylvania, inventor of the steamboat.

    In the 1740's Adam McConnell and his three sons settled in the Great Cove of Fulton County, having followed the pack horse trail from Lancaster. The first public road through Fulton County was established by son William McConnell in 1761, and amounted to a bridle path from Cove Gap to join Forbes Road near Breezewood. Today Routes 16 and 30 (the Lincoln Highway) follow this early road.

    Daniel McConnell deeded land for the town of McConnellsburg in 1786, which later became the seat of government for rural Fulton County. McConnellsburg is nestled in the heart of the picturesque Great Cove, and this delightful small town of about 1200 folks found itself as a stopping place on the main route to the great west from Philadelphia. The town developed around the road, and its growth throughout the 18th and 19th centuries flourished as the road grew in importance. The creation of the Lincoln Highway in 1914 brought further significance to the road, and new prestige to McConnellsburg as the nation's first transcontinental paved highway became the town's "Main Street".

    McConnellsburg's historic district was recognized by the United States Department of the Interior in 1993 when it was listed in the National Register of Historic Places. The district consists of 144 structures that contribute to its historic character. Of notable meaning are the numerous taverns, inns, automotive garages and other travel-related structures still in existence today, which includes Daniel McConnell's original log home.

    The original rural nature of Fulton County's 438 square miles is still preserved today as confirmed by the United States Census Bureau which lists the county population in 1885 as 7,564, while in 2000 our folks numbered 14,261. Fulton County offers an escape from today's faster-paced, more hectic way of life. Our gently rolling mountains and green fertile valleys provide a quiet, peaceful environment for numerous recreational opportunities. We enjoy over 50,000 acres of Pennsylvania State Forest land with lakes and streams that are replete with game and fish. Hunting, fishing, cycling, hiking, boating, camping, swimming, golfing, and hang-gliding are some of the popular outdoor and family activities available.

    Fulton County is also centrally located in southern Pennsylvania with easy accessibility to Interstate Routes 68, 70 and 81 plus the Pennsylvania Turnpike. We are within 2 hours driving of Harrisburg, PA, Baltimore, MD, and Washington, DC, and within 3 hours of Pittsburgh, PA and Philadelphia, PA.

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    Civil War in Song:

    The Battle Hymn of the Republic:

    Mine eyes have seen the glory of the coming of the Lord:
    He is trampling out the vintage where the grapes of wrath are stored;
    He hath loosed the fateful lightning of His terrible swift sword:
    His truth is marching on.
    (Chorus)
    Glory, glory, hallelujah!
    Glory, glory, hallelujah!
    Glory, glory, hallelujah!
    His truth is marching on
    I have seen Him in the watch-fires of a hundred circling camps,
    They have builded Him an altar in the evening dews and damps;
    I can read His righteous sentence by the dim and flaring lamps:
    His day is marching on.
    (Chorus)
    I have read a fiery gospel writ in burnished rows of steel:
    "As ye deal with my condemners, so with you my grace shall
    deal;
    Let the Hero, born of woman, crush the serpent with His heel,
    Since God is marching on."
    (Chorus)
    He has sounded forth the trumpet that shall never call retreat;
    He is sifting out the hearts of men before His judgment-seat:
    Oh, be swift, my soul, to answer Him! be jubilant, my feet!
    Our God is marching on.
    (Chorus)
    In the beauty of the lilies Christ was born across the sea,
    With a glory in His bosom that transfigures you and me:
    As He died to make men holy, let us die to make men free,
    While God is marching on.
    (Chorus)
    He is coming like the glory of the morning on the wave,
    He is wisdom to the mighty, He is succour to the brave,
    So the world shall be His footstool, and the soul of Time His slave,
    Our God is marching on.
    (Chorus)

    When Johnny Comes Marching Home

    When Johnny comes marching home again,
    Hurrah! Hurrah!
    We'll give him a hearty welcome then
    Hurrah! Hurrah!
    The men will cheer and the boys will shout
    The ladies they will all turn out
    And we'll all feel gay when Johnny comes marching home.

    The old church bell will peal with joy
    Hurrah! Hurrah!
    To welcome home our darling boy,
    Hurrah! Hurrah!
    The village lads and lassies say
    With roses they will strew the way,
    And we'll all feel gay when Johnny comes marching home.

    Get ready for the Jubilee,
    Hurrah! Hurrah!
    We'll give the hero three times three,
    Hurrah! Hurrah!
    The laurel wreath is ready now
    To place upon his loyal brow
    And we'll all feel gay when Johnny comes marching home.

    Let love and friendship on that day,
    Hurrah, hurrah!
    Their choicest pleasures then display,
    Hurrah, hurrah!
    And let each one perform some part,
    To fill with joy the warrior's heart,
    And we'll all feel gay when Johnny comes marching home

    Tenting Tonight on the Old Camp-Ground
    (Walter Kittredge)

    We're tenting tonight on the old camp-ground
    Give us a song to cheer
    Our weary hearts, a song of home
    And friends we love so dear.

    cho: Many are the hearts that are weary tonight
    Wishing for the war to cease,
    Many are the hearts looking for the right
    To see the dawn of peace.
    Tenting tonight, tenting tonight
    Tenting on the old camp-ground.

    We've been tenting tonight on the old camp-ground,
    Thinking of days gone by
    Of the loved ones at home that gave us the hand,
    And the tear that said, "Good-by !"
    cho:

    We are tired of war on the old camp-ground;
    Many are the dead and gone
    Of the brave and true who've left their homes;
    Others been wounded long.

    cho:

    We've been fighting today on the old camp-ground, .
    Many are lying near ;
    Some are dead, and some are dying,
    Many are in tears.

    final cho: Many are the hearts that are weary tonight,
    Wishing for the war to cease;
    Many are the hearts looking for the light,
    To see the dawn of peace.
    Dying tonight, dying tonight,
    Dying on the old camp-ground.

    Battle Cry of Freedom:

    Yes, we'll rally round the flag, boys, We'll rally once again, Shouting the battle cry of Freedom, We will rally from the hillside, We'll gather from the plain, Shouting the battle cry of Freedom. The Union forever, Hurrah! boys, hurrah! Down with the traitors, Up with the stars; While we rally round the flag, boys, Rally once again, Shouting the battle cry of Freedom. We are springing to the call Of our brothers gone before, Shouting the battle cry of Freedom; And we'll fill our vacant ranks with A million free men more, Shouting the battle cry of Freedom. We will welcome to our numbers The loyal, true and brave, Shouting the battle cry of Freedom; And although they may be poor, Not a man shall be a slave, Shouting the battle cry of Freedom. So we're springing to the call From the East and from the West, Shouting the battle cry of Freedom; And we'll hurl the rebel crew From the land that we love best, Shouting the battle cry of Freedom.

    Kingdom Coming by Henry Clay Work:

    Say, darkies, hab you seen de massa, wid de muffstash on his face,
    Go long de road some time dis mornin', like he gwine to leab de place?
    He seen a smoke way up de ribber, whar de Linkum gunboats lay;
    He took his hat, and lef' berry sudden, and I spec' he's run away!

    CHORUS: De massa run, ha, ha! De darkey stay, ho, ho!
    It mus' be now de kindom coming, an' de year ob Jubilo!

    He six foot one way, two foot tudder, and he weigh tree hundred pound,
    His coat so big, he couldn't pay the tailor, an' it won't go halfway round.
    He drill so much dey call him Cap'n, an' he got so drefful tanned,
    I spec' he try an' fool dem Yankees for to tink he's contraband.

    CHORUS

    De darkeys feel so lonesome libbing in de loghouse on de lawn,
    Dey move dar tings into massa's parlor for to keep it while he's gone.
    Dar's wine an' cider in de kitchen, an' de darkeys dey'll have some;
    I s'pose dey'll all be cornfiscated when de Linkum sojers come.

    CHORUS

    De obserseer he make us trouble, an' he dribe us round a spell;
    We lock him up in de smokehouse cellar, wid de key trown in de well.
    De whip is lost, de han'cuff broken, but de massa'll hab his pay;
    He's ole enough, big enough, ought to known better dan to went an' run away.

    CHORUS

    Marching Through Georgia

    Bring the good ol' Bugle boys! We'll sing another song, Sing it with a spirit that will start the world along, Sing it like we used to sing it fifty thousand strong, While we were marching through Georgia Hurrah! Hurrah! We bring the Jubilee. Hurrah! Hurrah! The flag that makes you free, So we sang the chorus from Atlanta to the sea, While we were marching through Georgia. How the darkeys shouted when they heard the joyful sound, How the turkeys gobbled which our commissary found, How the sweet potatoes even started from the ground, While we were marching through Georgia. Yes and there were Union men who wept with joyful tears, When they saw the honored flag they had not seen for years; Hardly could they be restrained from breaking forth in cheers, While we were marching through Georgia. "Sherman's dashing Yankee boys will never make the coast!" So the saucy rebels said and 'twas a handsome boast Had they not forgot, alas! to reckon with the Host While we were marching through Georgia. So we made a thoroughfare for freedom and her train, Sixty miles of latitude, three hundred to the main; Treason fled before us, for resistance was in vain While we were marching through Georgia.

    Lincoln and Liberty:

    Lincoln and Liberty
    (Jesse Hutchinson)

    Hurrah for the choice of the nation,
    Our chieftain so brave and so true,
    We'll go for the great reformation,
    For Lincoln and Liberty, too!

    We'll go for the son of Kentucky
    The hero of Hoosierdom through,
    The pride of the "Suckers" so lucky,
    For Lincoln and Liberty, too!

    They'll find what by felling and mauling,
    Our railmaker statesman can do;
    For the people are everywhere calling
    For Lincoln and Liberty too.

    Then up with the banner so glorious,
    The star-spangled red, white, and blue,
    We'll fight till our banner's victorious,
    For Lincoln and Liberty, too.

    Our David's good sling is unerring,
    The Slavocrat's giant he slew,
    Then shout for the freedom preferring,
    For Lincoln and Liberty, too.

    We'll go for the son of Kentucky,
    The hero of Hoosierdom through,
    The pride of the "Suckers" so lucky,
    For Lincoln and Liberty, too.

    Note: To Rosin the Beau

    Richmond is a Hard Road:

    Richmond is a Hard Road to Travel
    (words, anonymous; tune Daniel Decatur Emmett)

    Would you like to hear my song? I'm afraid it's rather long
    Of the famous "On to Richmond" double trouble,
    Of the half-a-dozen trips and half-a-dozen slips
    And the very latest bursting of the bubble.
    'Tis pretty hard to sing and like a round, round ring
    'Tis a dreadful knotty puzzle to unravel;
    Though all the papers swore, when we touched Virginia's shore
    That Richmond was a hard road to travel.
    Then pull off your coat and roll up your sleeve,
    Richmond is a hard road to travel,
    Then pull off your coat and roll up your sleeve,
    Richmond is a hard road to travel, I believe.

    First, McDowell, bold and gay, set forth the shortest way,
    By Manassas in the pleasant summer weather,
    But unfortunately ran on a Stonewall, foolish man,
    And had a "rocky journey" altogether;
    And he found it rather hard to ride o'er Beauregard,
    And Johnston proved a deuce of a bother,
    And'twas clear beyond a doubt that he didn't like the route,
    And a second time would have to try another.
    Then pull off your coat and roll up your sleeve,
    For Manassas is a hard road to travel;
    Manassas gave us fits, and Bull Run made us grieve,
    For Richmond is a hard road to travel, I believe!

    Next came the Wooly-Horse,* with an overwhelming force,
    To march down to Richmond by the Valley,
    But he couldn't find the road, and his "onward movement" showed
    His campaigning was a mere shilly-shally.
    Then Commissary Banks, with his motley foreign ranks,
    Kicking up a great noise, fuss, and flurry,
    Lost the whole of his supplies, and with tears in his eyes,
    From the Stonewall ran away in a hurry.
    Then pull off your coat and roll up your sleeve,
    For the Valley is a hard road to travel;
    The Valley wouldn't do and we all had to leave,
    For Richmond is a hard road to travel, I believe!

    Then the great Galena came, with her portholes all aflame,
    And the Monitor that famous naval wonder,
    But the guns at Drury's Bluff gave them speedily enough,
    The loudest sort of reg'lar Rebel thunder.
    The Galena was astonished and the Monitor admonished,
    Our patent shot and shell were mocked at,
    While the dreadful Naugatuck, by the hardest kind of luck,
    Was knocked into an ugly cocked hat.
    Then pull off your coat and roll up your sleeve,
    For James River is a hard road to travel;
    The gun-boats gave it up in terror and despair,
    For Richmond is a hard road to travel, I declare!

    Then McClellan followed soon, both with spade and balloon
    To try the Peninsular approaches,
    But one and all agreed that his best rate of speed
    Was no faster than the slowest of "slow coaches. "
    Instead of easy ground, at Williamsburg he found
    A Longstreet indeed, and nothing shorter,
    And it put him in the dumps, that spades wasn't trumps,
    And the Hills he couldn't level "as he orter."
    Then pull off your coat and roll up your sleeve
    For Longstreet is a hard road to travel -
    Lay down the shovel, and throw away the spade
    For Richmond is a hard road to travel, I'm afraid!

    Then said Lincoln unto Pope, "You can make the trip, I hope
    I will save the Universal Yankee nation,
    To make sure of no defeat, I'll leave no lines of retreat,
    And issue a famous proclamation."
    But that same dreaded Jackson, this fellow laid his whacks
    And made him, by compulsion, a seceder,**
    And Pope took rapid flight from Manassas' second fight,
    'Twas his very last appearance as a leader.
    Then pull off your coat and roll up your sleeve,
    For Stonewall is a hard road to travel;
    Pope did his very best, but was evidently sold,
    For Richmond is a hard road to travel, I am told!

    Last of all the brave Burnside, with his pontoon bridges, tried
    A road no one had thought of before him,
    With two hundred thousand men for the Rebel slaughter pen
    And the blessed Union flag waving o'er him;
    But he met a fire like hell, of canister and shell,
    That mowed his men down with great slaughter,
    'Twas a shocking sight to view, that second Waterloo,
    And the river ran with more blood than water.
    Then pull off your coat and roll up your sleeve,
    Rappahannock is a hard road to travel;
    Burnside got in a trap, which caused him for to grieve
    For Richmond is a hard road to travel, I believe!

    We are very much perplexed to know who is the next
    To command the new Richmond expedition,
    For the Capital must blaze, and that in ninety days,
    And Jeff and his men be sent to perdition.
    We'll take the cursed town, and then we'll burn it down,
    And plunder and hang up each cursed Rebel;
    Yet the contraband was right when he told us they would fight
    "Oh, yes, massa, they fight like the devil!"
    Then pull off your coat and roll up your sleeve,
    For Richmond is a hard road to travel;
    Then pull off your coat and roll up your sleeve,
    For Richmond is a hard road to travel, I believe!

    *General Fremont
    **The Battle of Cedar Run

    Coming to us Dead:

    One morning when the office was opened
    a man quite old in years
    Entered the express office
    showing signs of grief and tears
    And when the clerk approached him
    the old man then did say
    I'm waiting for my boy, sir
    he's coming home today

    Well. you have made a silly mistake
    and you must surely know
    This is the telegraph office, Sir
    and not a town depot
    If your boy is coming home
    the clerk did smile and say
    You'll find him with the passengers, Sir
    at the station just all the way

    You do not understand me, Sir
    the old man shook his head
    He's not a-coming as a passenger
    but by express instead
    He's coming home to mother
    the old man softly said
    He's coming home in a casket, Sir
    he's coming to us dead

    Then a whistle pierced their ears
    the express train someone cry
    The old man rose in a breathless haste
    and quickly rushed outside
    Then a long white casket
    was lowered to the ground
    The scene was filled with the grief and pain
    of those who gathered around

    Do not treat him harshly, boys
    it contains our darling Jack
    He went away as you boys are
    this way he's coming back
    He broke his poor old mother's heart
    Her fears have all come true
    She said, it’s the way that he'd come back
    If he joined the boys in blue

    We'll Fight for Uncle Sam:

    I am a modern hairo: my name is Paddy Kearney;
    Not long ago, I landed from the bogs of sweet Killarney;
    I used to cry out: SOAP FAT! bekase that was my trade, sir,
    Till I 'listed for a Soger-boy wid Corcoran's brigade, sir.

    Chorus: For to fight for Uncle Sam;
    He'll lade us on to glory, O!
    He'll lade us on to glory, O!
    To save the Stripes and Stars.

    Ora, once in regimentals, my mind it did bewildher.
    I bid good-bye to Biddy dear, and all the darling childher;
    Whoo! says I, the Irish Volunteers the divil a one afraid is,
    Bekase we've got the soger bould, McClellan, for to lade us.

    Chorus: For to fight for Uncle Sam, &c.

    We soon got into battle: we made a charge of bay'nets:
    The Rebel blaggards soon gave way: they fell as thick as paynuts.
    Och hone! the slaughter that we made, bedad, it was delighting!
    For, the Irish lads in action are the divil's boys for fighting.

    Chorus: They'll fight for Uncle Sam, &c.

    Och, sure, we never will give in, in any sort of manner,
    Until the South comes back agin, beneath the Starry-Banner;
    And if John Bull should interfere, he'd suffer for it truly;
    For, soon the Irish Volunteers would give him Ballyhooly.

    Chorus: Oh! they'll fight for Uncle Sam, &c.

    And! now, before I ind my song, this free advice I'll tender:
    We soon will use the Rebels up and make them all surrender,
    And, once again, the Stars and Stripes will to the breeze be swellin',
    If Uncle Abe will give us back our darling boy McClellan.

    Chorus: Oh! we'll follow Little Mac, &c.

    Army of the Free:

    In the army of the Union,
    we are marching in the van,
    And will do the work before us,
    if the bravest soldiers can;
    We will drive the Rebel forces
    from their strongholds to the sea,
    And will live and die together
    in the Army of the Free.

    cho: Army of the Free,
    The Army of the Free,
    We will live and die together
    in the Army of the Free.


    We may rust beneath inaction,
    we may sink beneath disease
    The summer sun may scorch us
    or the winter's blast may freeze,
    But whatever may befall us,
    we will let the Rebels see,
    The unconquered we shall remain
    the Army of the Free,

    The Army of the Free,
    The Army of the Free,
    Unconquered we shall remain
    The Army of the Free.

    We are the best division of
    a half a million souls,
    And only resting on our arms
    till the war cry onward rolls;
    When our gallant General Porter calls,
    why ready we shall be,
    To follow him forever
    with the Army of the Free,

    The Army of the Free,
    The Army of the Free,
    We will follow him forever
    With the Army of the Free.

    We have Butterfield the daring
    and we've Martindale the cool,
    Where could we learn the art of war
    within a better school,
    Add Morel to the list of names,
    and we must all agree,
    We have the finest Generals
    in the Army of the Free,

    The Army of the Free,
    The Army of the Free,
    We have the finest Generals
    In the Army of the Free.

    Though we live in winter quarters now,
    we're waiting but the hour,
    When Porter's brave division
    shall go forth in all its power,
    And when on the field of battle,
    fighting we shall be,
    We'll show that we cannot disgrace
    the Army of the Free,

    The Army of the Free,
    The Army of the Free,
    We'll show that we cannot disgrace
    The Army of the Free,

    Then hurrah for our division,
    may it soon be called to go,
    To add its strength to those who have
    advanced to meet the foe;
    God bless it, for we know right well,
    wherever it may be,
    'Twill never fail to honor our great
    Army of the Free,

    The Army of the Free,
    The Army of the Free,
    'Twill never fail to honor our great
    Army of the Free.

    Glory, Glory, Hallelujuh:

    'Glory Glory Hallelujah
    (African-American Traditional)

    Verse 1:
    Glory, glory, hallelujah,
    since I laid my burden down.

    Glory, glory, hallelujah,
    since I laid my burden down.

    Verse 2:
    Friends don't treat me like they used to
    since I laid my burden down.

    Friends don't treat me like they used to
    since I laid my burden down.

    Verse 3:
    I feel better, so much better
    since I laid my burden down.

    I feel better, so much better
    since I laid my burden down.

    Verse 4:
    Feel like shouting, "hallelujah",
    since I laid my burden down.

    Feel like shouting, "hallelujah",
    since I laid my burden down.

    Verse 5:
    I am climbing Jacob's ladder
    since I laid my burden down.

    I am climbing Jacob's ladder
    since I laid my burden down.

    Verse 6:
    Every round goes higher and higher
    since I laid my burden down.

    Every round goes higher and higher
    since I laid my burden down.

    Tribute to the Union Fallen

    Johnny Cash Sings Civil War Songs

    The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down

    Civil War Songs

    American Civil War History




    Father: Mahlon BARTON b: 13 SEP 1807 in Bedford County, Pennsylvania
    Mother: Anna JAMES b: 26 JAN 1806 in Pennsylvania
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